Outdoors

Coastal ponds have unique communities consisting of flora and fauna that can adjust to varying salinities and varying temperatures
The American oyster the pond was named after still thrives there in most years. Victoria Bustamante Photo

Hints of global warming
Non-native grasses like broomsedge and purple love grass, which normally thrive in slightly warmer climates, are taking over in open meadows where the native little bluestem once thrived. Larry Penny PhotosNon-native grasses like broomsedge and purple love grass, which normally thrive in slightly warmer climates, are taking over in open meadows where the native little bluestem once thrived. Larry Penny Photo

They are the only truly hibernating mammals we have on Long Island
Woodchucks have been making their way east on Long Island. This one was photographed by remote camera last summer outside its Bridgehampton burrow for Jill Musnicki’s “What Comes Around” art installation, part of the Parrish Art Museum Road Show. Jill Musnicki

Carolina wrens often nest in old sheds, barns, under decks, and the like
The natural world in action at the Nature Trail in East Hampton, as an immature Cooper’s hawk dragged a mallard to the water’s edge. Walter Thomason

It isn’t hard to start an organization, but it is hard to keep one going
On a visit to the LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton this fall, young members of a nature club sponsored by Third House Nature Center posed with sculptures by Yue Min Jun. Vicki Bustamante

When we examine infrahuman cultures, say, those of primates, we do find some progressive cultures

Calcium ions help keep marine waters basic with pHs above 7

The Long Island Christmas Bird Counts

The “Bambi Syndrome”
In that 20-or-so-mile stretch including Montauk Highway, Bluff Road, Further and Dunemere Lanes, Route 114, and Noyac Road, there were no less than 80 deer. John Schoen

The Montauk Christmas Count is the oldest east of the city, dating back to the early 1920s
Brown pelicans are occasional visitors to the South Fork, but are rare outside of the summer months. This one, a juvenile, was photographed near the Montauk inlet early in December. Vicki Bustamante