Editorials

The so-called Panama Papers scandal, which took down Iceland’s prime minister on Tuesday, may seem a long way from eastern Long Island. Because the ownership of many of the most valuable properties here remains secret, however, just who might be hiding next door, so to speak, is a good question.
All but lost amid the discussion of new setbacks and coverage rules for construction in Sag Harbor was a proposal to ban rooftop solar energy systems in nearly the entire village.
East Hampton Town has begun work on a set of so-called hamlet studies. Six in all, they are supposed to result in recommendations for the town’s commercial areas. The objective is to produce a document that will guide future land-use decisions and allow commerce to function while avoiding sprawl and other negative effects of growth.
The osprey were a couple of days late this week — or they were right on time. It depended on whom you asked and where, in turn, they were looking.
The South Fork has a housing crisis. Just ask almost any employer or a prospective employee who has considered moving to the region for a job. Places to live are all but unavailable. So far, attempts by local government to find solutions have failed to meet demand.
In the Northeast, to no small measure this will mean wind power — and when one thinks about wind power on a scale large enough to make a difference, that means offshore turbines.
Doing something about corruption and influence peddling in Albany appears high on the to-do list for lawmakers — except when it comes to their own bank accounts.
Attention to environmental concerns is growing here, with some positive results. We are enthusiastic about a $100,000 study of an electric “microgrid” in East Hampton Town, which could provide clean power and better electrical service during outages.
Two major municipal condemnation initiatives, which are moving slowly ahead in Sag Harbor and on a long strip of beach on Napeague, warrant more public consideration.