arts

The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will hold its annual Thanksgiving weekend “Holiday Party + Market” Friday and Saturday. The market, which continues the decades-long tradition formerly known as “Parrish Presents,” will be open Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
In what has become a holiday tradition, the Southampton Cultural Center will present “It’s a Wonderful Life, a Live Radio Play,” Joe Landry’s twist on Frank Capra’s iconic holiday film, tomorrow at 7 p.m. and Sunday afternoon at 2 and 5.
The Southampton Arts Center is throwing a party for a good cause tomorrow night from 8 until 10. Billed as “The Harvest Night Out,” the evening, featuring dancing to D.J. Twilo, will celebrate local nonprofits, farms, and small businesses. “Think barn-raising party, without the tedious barn-raising part,” said Amy Kirwin, the center’s director of...
The East Hampton Historical Society’s 2016 House and Garden tour offers an opportunity to burn a few holiday calories while visiting five houses that run the gamut from an 1840s Greek Revival to a contemporary waterfront at Lazy Point. The annual Thanksgiving weekend event will take place Saturday from 1 to 4:30 p.m.
It was an upbringing in the arts that in 2013 inspired Sandra Tyler to create the Woven Tale Press, a monthly online journal of arts and literature that also stands as a tribute to her mother, the late Elizabeth Sloan Tyler, an acclaimed South Fork artist.
If you can’t get to today’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, a new book from Rizzoli that celebrates the event’s 90th anniversary might be the next best thing. “Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: A New York Holiday Tradition,” includes archival photographs and an essay by Steven M. Silverman on its past and present, but what really brings the parade...
LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton will hold a holiday gathering on Saturday afternoon from 2 to 4, rain or shine.
Bob Dylan, always enigmatic, kept the world guessing for 17 days after he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Considering the issues it examines, the timing of this year’s African American Film Festival could not have been more fortuitous, according to Brenda Simmons, executive director of the Southampton African American Museum and organizer of the festival.
Who would have thought a stage version of a classic 19th-century novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne would also work as a commentary on our recent politics? Certainly not me, who took the opportunity to view “The Scarlet Letter” (running through Nov. 26 at Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theater) as a respite from election exhaustion.
From time to time, it is worth considering the world outside our own little bubble. Fairfield Porter, an artist with whom South Fork visual art enthusiasts are well acquainted, is such an example.
Residents and visitors to the South Fork may know that both John Lennon and Paul McCartney have spent time here, the latter an annual visitor to his house in Amagansett. Another member of the Beatles’ orbit, Peter Brown, who worked for their manager, the late Brian Epstein, has long summered in East Hampton.
The JDTLab at Guild Hall will stage “Door of No Return,” a one-woman show written and performed by Nehassaiu deGannes, on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Kelli Wicke Davis will direct the free program, which has a new score by Janice Lowe.