government

Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. and State Senator Kenneth P. LaValle have sponsored legislation that would set up a seafood marketing task force to promote the marketing and sustainability of seafood landed in New York State waters.
The East Hampton Town Trustees approved three initiatives aimed at restoring eelgrass in waterways at their meeting on Monday.
Tim Sini, the county police commissioner who is running to be Suffolk district attorney, and Bridget Fleming, who is seeking re-election to the County Legislature, will speak on Monday.
Zach Cohen, who is seeking to run for a seat on the East Hampton Town Board on the Democratic Party ticket, filed a petition with the Suffolk County Board of Elections on Tuesday to participate in a primary election that would be held on Sept. 12.
A Suffolk County effort mandated by the state is underway with the goal of reducing property taxes or eliminating tax increases by getting municipalities in the county to coordinate or eliminate duplicated services and to make purchases together for better prices.
Today is the day that Uber, Lyft, and other “transportation network companies” can begin operating legally on the South Fork, as the result of a law approved in Albany earlier this month.
The East Hampton Town Trustees will apply this week for an emergency permit to open Georgica Pond to the Atlantic Ocean, according to Francis Bock, the governing body’s presiding officer.
Southampton has established the East Coast’s first “green zone” in a town-owned East Quogue park, where it is using electric-powered maintenance equipment only, to reduce noise levels and eliminate carbon emissions and toxic pollutants.
A court decision last fall prohibiting barns and other structures on farmland protected by a Suffolk County program may play into a lawsuit challenging a barn on Peconic Land Trust acreage in Amagansett.
The aerial application of mosquito larvicide over marshlands in East Hampton Town could be reduced if a proposed new protocol demonstrates less need for it.
The Town of East Hampton learned on Monday that the United States Supreme Court will not review a lower court decision that struck down three 2015 laws restricting access to the East Hampton Airport in order to reduce aircraft noise.
Two laws adopted last Thursday revise the rules for restaurants and for retail takeout food shops, giving restaurants the ability to seek permission to accommodate more outdoor diners and legalizing seating in food shops.
Under the proposed law, installation of one of the new nitrogen-reducing systems would be required for new construction, when undertaking a substantial expansion, when an existing system fails and needs replacing, and when commercial sites require new site plan review.