outdoors

It’s that time of year again when all of the local birds finish raising and weaning their second broods. The migrants among them have already flown south, and the year-round residents are out foraging and mapping the locations of all of the feeding stations in preparation for winter.
Striped bass and bluefish soon will begin their migration south and, we hope, come within surfcasting range. Fishermen hoping to bend a rod and others eager to observe the spectacle of birds diving, fish crashing bait, and rows of anglers launching lures into the surf will slowly roll their cars off the hard pavement into the soft sand.
I’m looking out my window at pines that are more brown than green. “Oh, darn, the dreaded pine beetle,” I say to myself. Driving around the roads today I saw lots of pines already gone and lots of others on the way out.
While most East End fishermen wisely retreat to the comfort of home during a period of fierce northeast wind and rain, others pull on their waders, grab a stout surfcasting rod, and head toward the Point in search of big striped bass.
It’s that time of year again. Greens turn to yellows, reds, and oranges. Colorful birds flit from treetop to treetop, feeder to feeder. Gray squirrels and blue jays gather and sequester bronzy acorns. Azure skies sail overhead and morph into carmine-purple sunsets, then 7-to-7 uninterrupted black. Better to appreciate the harlequin days against a...
While we see if Hurricane Matthew, a humdinger of a storm in the Caribbean Sea as of Monday, comes to us or spins off toward Europe, it’s a good time to go over some of the coastal terms that we have all heard from past experiences, but may have faded into the non-recall department.
False albacore, bluefish, and striped bass aggressively feed on bay anchovies, but it is a challenge for surfcasters to find a castable lure that matches their petite size and profile.
A great number of striped bass over 40 pounds have been caught locally so far this season. Among these cow bass are several that weighed over 50 pounds, which for many serious anglers is the dividing line between a large and true trophy fish.
Paddle Diva has appealed to the East Hampton Town Zoning Board of Appeals to reverse a decision by the town’s head building inspector in March that her operation at the Shagwong Marina on Three Mile Harbor constitutes an illegal expansion of its use.