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  • This year, LongHouse’s arts committee has made some bold and dramatic selections well suited for the unique environment.
  • We are all accustomed to seeing boldface names associated with the South Fork: Alec, Jimmy, Gwyneth, Sir Paul, et al. Yet, there is something fresh and pulse-quickening about the faces and names of a different century: Pablo, Jean, Cole, Man Ray, Ernest, Scott, and Zelda lighting up the current exhibition “Living Well Is the Best Revenge: A Jazz Age Fable of Sara and Gerald Murphy” at Clinton Academy in East Hampton.
  • Hidden away in Noyac, this year’s Hampton Designer Showhouse is a reflection of current tastes and trends inside and out.
  • It seems silly in retrospect, but there was once a time when painting was so out of favor in the art world that artists who chose it as a medium were considered doomed to irrelevancy.
  • Public life these days is filled with images, some posed and others less scripted or welcome. While celebrities and starlets can refuse to participate in requests for selfies and such, those holding elected office have to consider how the public will view them if they are uncooperative. Fearing reprisals, the world of political photography has moved from very stilted setups to a more casual and natural feeling.
  • It is well known in print circles that Stanley William Hayter was a master of innovation in early Modernist printmaking. What is less known is that his studio, Atelier 17, inspired some 200 other artists, including Jackson Pollock, to push the limits of the various mediums in both engraved and relief techniques.
  • “Betting on Zero” isn’t your typical summer blockbuster, even for a documentary. There are no absolute winners and, arguably, no clear heroes. It’s not about kids or animals, and it is set in the until-recently lackluster world of finance.
  • First there were cat videos, which were shown in Southampton earlier this summer. Now, the canine crowd will have their chance to celebrate their favorite pets at the Dog Film Festival on Tuesday at Guild Hall.
  • Maia Ruth Lee and Peter Sutherland, an artistic couple with varying viewpoints and methods, have individual shows at the Fireplace Project in Springs, both of which seem reflective of the country’s mood on the eve of a divisive presidential election and in the wake of a global wave of violence and uncertainty.
  • East Hampton’s Eric Firestone Gallery is in a reflective mood with its current exhibition, “MirrorMirror,” offering not only show-stopping surfaces of (literal) reflection but also addressing art that mirrors itself in its design, sometimes presenting a complete double of its composition and sometimes a slightly askew version.

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