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  • Outside of some art-world friends who lived on the East End, Ray Johnson had a tenuous association here until his ultimate performance in Sag Harbor became the stuff of local and international legend and inextricably bound him to the area. Earnest young artists have made pilgrimages here to retrace his steps and delve for meaning in his use of the numeral 13 and its factors in his age, choice of date, and room number at Baron’s Cove Inn.

  • It is the time of year when galleries often scale their offerings down, not to include less, but to show more, albeit smaller, works at friendlier price points for gift giving. As much as the art world plays by different rules, size does matter, at least when determining value.

  • One of the second wave of 20th-century artists who found their way to the South Fork and used the landscape as a chief source of inspiration, Jane Freilicher died on Dec. 9 at home in New York City of complications of pneumonia. She was 90.

  • “The 50 Year Argument” by Martin Scorsese and David Tedeschi, screened at the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival, offers proof not just of the vitality of the documentary medium, but of the growing importance of the festival itself.

  • Although we may have become more jaded and immune to Robert Gober’s jarring dislocations of familiar objects and experiences, there is still something visceral and uncanny in the bringing together of many of them in one confined space.

    For the past few weeks, the Museum of Modern Art has had such an installation on its second floor. “The Heart Is Not a Metaphor” is an exhibition that not only takes over unusual spaces in the building but also disrupts them in service to the art.

  • Museum acquisition shows have an air of bridal and baby showers about them. A rather large group of gifts is assembled in one or several rooms while guests get to gawk at them and comment on their appropriateness or shortcomings. It’s rather fun.

  • If the list of artists at East Hampton’s Drawing Room gallery seems like the usual mishmash of gallery standbys, think again. While many of the artists are familiar to the space, the always-brilliant installation skills of the gallery directors, Emily Goldstein and Victoria Munroe, make the artwork sing in ways that are surprising and delightful.

  • Stephan Keszler, who has had a presence here with galleries in several locations, is featured in a documentary on the anonymous street artist and provocateur who calls himself Banksy.
  • In “Loop Holes,” Louise Eastman’s homespun weavings and cast bricks look perfectly at home in the barn that houses the Silas Marder Gallery exhibition space in Bridgehampton. Yet they would look equally at home in some of the South Fork’s remaining untouched classic midcentury ranches, complete with linoleum floors and Formica countertops.

  • If you’ve ever wondered who sits in the big bay window on the second floor of The Star’s office building, that would be me. It is a great perch to witness the life of the village throughout the seasons. Up in the treetops there are leaves budding, blooming, changing, and falling, sparrows peeping in, and the occasional cardinal.

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  • A battle between titans of the worlds of finance and art has gone to Larry Gagosian, who beat back a lawsuit from Ronald Perelman over a deal gone sour. 

    Mr. Perelman's fraud lawsuit against Mr. Gagosian, filed in 2012, was dismissed by a New York State appeals court panel on Thursday.

  • Five buildings comprised this year’s East Hampton Historical Society house tour, all in East Hampton Village. An ambitious person, or one with a new Fitbit, could have walked it.

    With a house and guest cottage on Buell Lane, two houses on Hither Lane, and one on Further Lane it was a real snapshot of how the style of people lived in earlier days could brought up to contemporary needs and preferences.

    The tour happens every year the Saturday after Thanksgiving and features new houses each year.

  • While the actual Art Basel Miami Beach fair won’t open to the public until Thursday, many of the satellite fairs sprouting up all over Miami this week will open their doors to patrons today and tomorrow.

    Untitled, one of the fairs on the beach and the home of Eric Firestone Gallery and Halsey Mckay Gallery for the week, had its vernissage last night and will hold a VIP preview today before opening to the public tomorrow.

  • Artists associated with the East End helped Christie’s auction house take in a record-breaking $853 million on Wednesday night, with Andy Warhol leading the way with two works, “Triple Elvis” and “Four Marlons,” achieving $81.9 million and $69.6 million, respectively. Out of 80 lots, there were 30 by artists who have lived and worked here over the past century.

  • A colorful and artistic crowd gathered at Guild Hall  on Saturday night to celebrate the opening of two new exhibitions: "Mary Ellen Bartley: Leaning Above the Page" and "New Additions and Works From the Permanent Collection."

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.