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Articles by this author:

  • As the skies began to darken last week on the eve of the first heavy rain in months, Susan Wood was concerned.

  • Walking into Guild Hall in East Hampton these days is like walking into a Sistine Chapel composed of text. Barbara Kruger’s installation has so thoroughly transformed the architecture of the Moran Gallery that walls fade away and ceilings are obliterated with colossal sans serif white type against a glossy black background.

  • This past year, some of recent history’s more creative and flamboyant spirits have discovered and interacted with an eccentric and eclectic monument to the artistic pursuits of one of their own. That the artist was Barney Rosset, known primarily for his championing of literature and film, surprised most. But the artifact he created stunned all.

    What they saw was a 12-by-22-foot wall-spanning mural, as ambitious as it is idiosyncratic, and a true emblem of the 20th century, even though it was conceived during the 21st.

  • When Tracey Jackson and Paul Williams first met in the 1980s, the last thing either of them thought was that they might join up to address addictive behavior in a self-help recovery book.

  • It could not have been easy to be an American artist at the turn of the 20th century and the years to follow.

    Playing catch-up with the revolutionary movements of European modern art must have been discouraging at the very least to the young artists who tried. Those who did may have been dismissed by unsympathetic audiences or shunned entirely by fellow artists for not pursuing a more nativist vision.

  • If the precisely formed collage works of Glenn Fischer feel familiar, it is because they have visited the South Fork before, in group shows at the Sara Nightingale Gallery in Water Mill and at the Kathryn Markel Gallery in Bridgehampton. The Bronx-based artist is now flying solo at Nightingale, captivating passers-by looking in from the street and viewers within the gallery.

  • Sabina Streeter’s studio sits on Madison Street in Sag Harbor just across from Il Cappucino. It is a good perch to witness the mid-August street scene that was passing by during a recent interview, as well as the village’s ever-changing landscape over the 15 or so years she has lived and worked there.

  • The gallerist Larry Gagosian has a long-running lawsuit against him brought by Ronald Perelman, a former friend and client.
  • While some of us were basking in the sun or sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic to get to the next much-hyped event, Enoc Perez was hard at work in his East Hampton studio on the pieces presented in “Summer Job” at Harper’s Books in East Hampton.
        The frothy riff touches on social media, appropriation, modern art, and, if you’re feeling academic in these lazy dog days, Lacanian notions and related theories of the subject and object of the gaze in art.

  • Late summer on the South Fork can sometimes seem like a mostly deflated balloon: paunchy, flaccid, and spent. A sense of scraping bottom often takes hold, and any new endeavor, show, or exhibition is met with suspicion or derision, often borne of the same contagious exhaustion.

Blogs by this author:

  • The Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons celebrated the 10th edition of its calendar on Saturday night at the Water Mill home of Sandra Powers, who is this year's pet calendar chairwoman.

    Previous artists such as Paul Davis, Carol Saxe, and Billy Sullivan joined Eric Fischl, who conceived this year's cover. 

    Calendars are on sale now through ARF. Those interested can call Kathy at 537-0400,extension 214.

  • The Water Mill Museum is holding its annual quilt show through Sept. 14. A tradition spanning almost three decades, the show features dozens of quilts hung and draped over every available surface, making a riot of color and patterns throughout the old mill space.

    Each is hand-crafted and reasonably priced for both new and vintage pieces. There are traditional quilts, baby quilts, and crazy quilts.

    A special queen-sized quilt up for raffle features shades of blue and yellow and will be awarded to a winning ticket on Oct. 11 at the museum’s Bowls of Plenty event.

  • There are only three more performances of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” at Mulford Farm, presented by the Hamptons Independent Theater Festival, known more familiarly as HITFest. If you can, see all three.

    The two-hour production is a delight from start to finish, harnessing a bit of Ariel’s magic to make the spare set and staging as engaging as the acting is polished and professional, rivaling Public Theater productions in Central Park I’ve seen over the years.

  • The Watermill Center held its benefit “One Thousand Nights and One Night/Sleepless Nights of Sheherazade” on Saturday night with Jim Jarmusch playing guitar in the Zen room and guests such as Philip Glass and Isabelle Huppert milling about the grounds. The party raised $2.2 million for the center’s International Summer Program and its year-round artists residencies and education programs.

  • Although Southampton Town police officers did their best to keep traffic moving on County Road 39, drivers heading to the fair mixing with the regular summer evening traffic made for a messy commute on Thursday night.

  • “White Hot + Blue” was the theme of this year’s LongHouse Reserve’s benefit in East Hampton on Saturday and the grounds and guests were done up just right.

  • Susan and Stanley Reifer will open their Bridgehampton garden on Saturday from 10 am to 3 pm. through the Garden Conservency.

    The garden was designed by Jian Guo Xu, Chinese artist who has incorporate Taoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism on the garden's five acres. The garden includes pavilions, bridges, and water features accessed by winding paths.

    The garden is at 5 Paumanok Road, Bridgehampton and  admission is $5.

  • The Parrish Art Museum’s sold-out Midsummer Party on Saturday night raised $1.25 million and attracted some 1,000 guests.

    The event honored Inga Maren Otto, a philanthropist, and Katharina Otto-Bernstein, a filmmaker and author.

  • Thursday night was the night to be in Bridgehampton. Long lines of cars snaked through the back roads and front roads around the Bridgehampton Museum and Nova's Ark where two annual art fairs have taken up residence for the next few days.

    It was the opening night for both ArtHamptons and Art Market Hamptons and even those with black cards, VIP passes, or other bells and whistles on their forms of entry had a tough time negotiating parking.

    Inside, however, all was lively and fun, as these photos of the Art Market Hamptons fair by Morgan McGivern demonstrate. 

  • An auction benefiting LongHouse Reserve is open for bidding now at Paddle 8. The sale is being held in conjunction with the East Hampton garden and art center’s annual benefit on July 19.