Recent Stories: Garden

Debra Scott
April 17, 2014

Edwina Von Gal, a celebrated landscape designer who divides her time between Springs and Panama, wants it known that it is possible to have a perfectly manicured lawn without using chemicals.

Her new website — perfectearthproject.org — offers answers on how to arrive at a velvety blanket of grass naturally. Ms. Von Gal said she hadn’t paid much attention to lawns over the years, as she focused on gardens. “I’m an old hippie. I was always organic, yet I never insisted that my clients do the same.”

Evan Harris
April 17, 2014

At our house, the back is a small world with a climbing tree for the boys, a garden, and a yard defined by mismatched fencing in various stages of repair. Beyond lies swampy woods. 

It’s my husband’s garden that occupies the heart of our backyard world — not unobtrusively tucked away or off to the side, not removed like in the way-back, but right there. Right there when you drive up the driveway, right there when you walk down the walk; it definitely scored prime real estate. 

Star staff
April 8, 2014

    The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons will present an illustrated lecture by Vincent Covello, author of “The Japanese Art of Stone Appreciation,” on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Bridgehampton Community House.

Star staff
March 11, 2014

    “Help and Where to Get It for Your Garden’s Health,” a full-day seminar covering six topics, will be hosted by the Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A panel of horticultural experts from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County will conduct the program.

Abby Jane Brody
March 4, 2014
Most people have had their fill of snow this winter, but our gardens would fare much better if they remained covered by a blanket of snow until the jet stream changes and the cycle of freeze-thaw gives way to stable, moderating temperatures.

    Gardeners will understand when I say I was elated last Thursday afternoon when it seemed the snow might actually accumulate. That was not to be. The so-called Sunday-night storm was a bust, too. It has been a week of the worst of all possible worlds for our gardens: temperatures plunged with no renewal of the poor man’s compost, snow.

Star staff
March 4, 2014

    “The Flower of Empire,” an illustrated talk by Tatiana Holway, author of a book by the same name, will take place Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Bridgehampton Community House. Published last April, Ms. Holway’s book describes the 1837 discovery in Guiana of a giant Amazonian water lily that influenced botany, industry, culture, and empire in Victorian England.  Admission is $10, free for members, and refreshments will be provided.
 

Abby Jane Brody
February 19, 2014

    Would you like a tip on how to convince yourself it’s a bright and sunny day when the reality is quite the opposite?      
            
    Use plants with clear yellow, evergreen foliage.

Abby Jane Brody
February 11, 2014

    If it’s possible, I think I love my garden best in winter and find it more exciting than in spring. That’s because something is in flower, and most often it is fragrant, nearly every sunny, warm day from Christmas week on. Spring, when everything explodes into flower at once, can be overwhelming. So much is happening that it all becomes a big blur. But in January and February, the garden slows down, and it is easier to appreciate and luxuriate in each of the garden’s treasures.   

Star staff
February 4, 2014

    The Madoo Conservancy in Saga­ponack will open its winter lecture series on Sunday at noon with “City Parks: Public Places, Private Thoughts,” a talk by Catie Marron, author of the book by the same name.

Star staff
February 4, 2014

    LongHouse Reserve has announced its first study tour, to London and gardens in Sussex, Kent, the Cotswalds, and the capital. The tour will take place June 5 through June 12 and will focus on gardens at the height of the season.

Star staff
January 28, 2014

    The first Robert Dash Discourse on Garden Design, planned to be an annual benefit for the Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack, will take place on Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. at the Carlton Hobbs Gallery in Manhattan. Arne Maynard, a noted garden designer based in London and Wales, will speak on “A Sense of Place,” discussing his projects in Europe and the United States. A cocktail reception will follow.

Star staff
October 22, 2013

    The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons’ library in the Bridgehampton Community House, which was has been closed for renovations, will celebrate its reopening Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. with a reception for the public and members of the alliance. The library has Long Island’s largest collection of horticultural books, magazines, and videos.

Abby Jane Brody
October 22, 2013

    What? How could it be October when jolts of fresh colors and sensuous fragrance have been reverberating in the garden all month?
          
    I don’t mean the last roses of the year or the Coreopsis Full Moon that has been flowering its little yellow heads off since July in the Mimi Meehan Native Plant Garden.

Star staff
September 18, 2013

   LongHouse Reserve will present Fergus Garrett and Warrie Price with honors at its biennial Landscape Awards Ceremony and lunch, beginning at noon on Saturday. The event recognizes the “craft and selfless service of two prominent horticultural leaders,” according to LongHouse.

Abby Jane Brody
July 16, 2013

    The fog, drizzle, and downpour on Saturday morning reflected the mood of the scores who attended a funeral service at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton for Jim Jeffrey. Nature shed tears for the loss of a friend and leader who touched the lives of many in the diverse pockets of our community: music, A.A., the congregation of St. Luke’s, gays and lesbians, and not least, gardening.  I can’t speak for the other groups, but in the East Hampton gardening world, Jim was patriarch.

Star staff
June 18, 2013

   LongHouse Reserve’s annual container invitational, “Planters: ON+OFF the Ground VI,” in which top landscape designers, artists, and other horticultural professionals compete to see who can create the most striking “container” of plant material, will open to the public on Saturday. Visitors may vote for their favorites for the People’s Choice Award starting at 2 p.m. This year’s judges, all of them well known in the field, are Tovah Martin, Paula Dietz, and Jack deLashmet.    

Jennifer Landes
June 11, 2013

    After a sojourn in Southampton last year, the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons’ garden tour, now in its 27th year, returns to East Hampton on June 15. The tour features six private gardens, complimentary admission to the Much Ado About Madoo garden market sale in Sagaponack, and a separate cocktail reception.
    Highlights include the gardens of two landscape designers, Craig James Socia’s Craigmoor property on Accabonac Road and that of Michael Derrig and his wife, Dwyer, on Buell Lane Extension.

Star staff
June 11, 2013

    The Madoo Conservancy is celebrating its 20th birthday with a two-day gardening event that will combine socializing, shopping, and education all in the verdant and captivating environment of Robert Dash’s home and public garden in Sagaponack.

Star staff
June 4, 2013

    The Parrish Art Museum’s Landscape Pleasures garden tour and lecture benefit will take place on Saturday and Sunday. The theme of this year’s program, co-chaired by Lillian Cohen, Jack deLashmet, Martha B. McLanahan, and Linda Hackett Munson, is “Modernism, Minimalism, and Meadows.”
    On Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., a symposium will include three talks with Thomas Woltz, Richard Hartlage, and a joint presentation by Christopher LaGuardia and Viola Rouhani.

Abby Jane Brody
May 21, 2013

   The great rush is on to select colorful annuals for summer beds and containers. But this season may prove traumatic for the many who relied on impatiens for great swaths of nonstop color in shady areas.
    By now word is out that the popular workhorse Impatiens walleriana, including the double rosebud and miniature types, has been affected by a deadly downy mildew disease. Reality probably won’t set in until you actually go out to purchase your plants.

Janis Hewitt
April 26, 2013

The hydrangea just might be the East End’s favorite flower – beloved for producing unending armloads of color, from blue and pink Nikkos to vanilla-cone PeeGees. I love them for the bouquets that grace many places in and out of my house in the warmer months. That I am not alone can be witnessed on a drive through the South Fork in summer, when you will see big, showy blooms waving from the smallest backyards to the expansive grounds of multimillion-dollar mansions. In some neighborhoods hydrangeas are also as ubitquitous as privet.

Jennifer Landes
April 26, 2013
Designed from the start to work in tandem with the museum, the grounds will evoke the rural features of the area and the museum structure, which the Swiss architects describe as an “agrarian vernacular shed.”

Is it possible that some people who regularly visit the South Fork are unaware that the Parrish Art Museum has relocated to Water Mill on the site of an old nursery? Not likely.

Still, in the mostly effusive reception the Herzog and de Meuron building has received in the regional, national, and international press since it opened in November, the 15-acre property on which the building sits, designed by Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architecture in Massachusetts, has been largely overlooked.

Robert Dash
February 19, 2013

   Of course, Evelyn Nilles is not his name and he just might be female so much does he resemble so many. “He” is that transportable Englishman, perhaps titled but in a minor county way, who is at every garden do on both sides of the shared ocean, who knows everyone and nothing at all and has become indispensable to the contemporary garden and its various affairs.

Robert Dash
February 5, 2013

   All agree that no garden is complete without still or moving water, but lack there still will be without a forest no matter how bijou. Call it copse or spinney or bosque, just so long as it is definitely a wood. The reasons are many and obvious. No gazebo or ramada nor certainly an umbrella is ever equal to its shade, which is always moving. None of them can equal the coolness they present nor the odors of a patch of woods, nor the quickness of squirrels, chipmunks, birds in general and mourning doves and woodpeckers in particular.