Recent Stories: Lead C

Mark Segal
April 17, 2018
A break-in at his New York City studio years ago left the then Neo-Expressionist painter with only his small landscape and still-life paintings, and changed the course of his career.

When Ronald G. Pisano’s book “Long Island Landscape Painting, Vol. 2: The Twentieth Century” was published in 1990, Bruce Lieberman, then in his early 30s, was the youngest painter to be included. It was an honor, to be sure, but slightly misleading. 

April 3, 2018
Enter any gallery dedicated to “Ten Americans: After Paul Klee” at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., and the Swiss artist’s effect on a broad range of work by some of the East End's most iconic artists is immediately evident.

What a difference a Klee makes. Enter any gallery dedicated to “Ten Americans: After Paul Klee,” the Phillips Collection exhibition on view through May 6 in Washington, D.C., and the Swiss artist’s effect on a broad range of work is immediately evident.

Mark Segal
March 28, 2018
Mr. Friedberg, who has designed more than 30 films for such notable directors as Todd Haynes, Ang Lee, Julie Taymor, Wes Anderson, Charlie Kaufman, Darren Aronofsky, and Ava DuVernay, did not set out to be a production designer. “I didn’t know there was such a job."

Mark Friedberg was 2 in 1965 when his father bought 10 acres of land at the north end of Springs-Fireplace Road overlooking Accabonac Harbor. Growing up, he spent every summer there. “My friends and I pretty much had a Tom Sawyer existence. Much of my developing life was spent in the woods and fields between our place and the Springs General Store.”

He remembers going to the general store before Dan Miller sold it in 1970, when the legend of Jackson Pollock was still pervasive. No wonder, then, that Mr. Friedberg’s role as production designer of the 2000 film “Pollock” was “a very special experience, a kind of coming home for me.”  

Jon M. Diat
February 6, 2018
For those who demand the freshest, most sustainable seafood, and partake in the increasingly popular and expanding Montauk-headquartered Dock to Dish community-supported fishery program, keeping an eye on your seafood order is a simple mouse click away.

It’s 10 p.m. Do you know where your shipments of iced-down, black sea bass are? Or perhaps you want to check on the status of the longline boat that is catching your carton of golden tilefish from the 500-foot depths of the Hudson Canyon, located about 80 miles south of Montauk? For those who demand the freshest, most sustainable seafood, and partake in the increasingly popular and expanding Montauk-headquartered Dock to Dish community-supported fishery program, keeping an eye on your seafood order is a simple mouse click away. 

Judy D’Mello
January 30, 2018
In anticipation of Donald Trump's first State of the Union address, thousands of people across the United States gathered in libraries, museums, living rooms, and churches to participate in an annual civic ritual called the People’s State of the Union.

Donald Trump delivered his first State of the Union address on Tuesday, marking the end of his first year in office. In anticipation, thousands of people across the United States gathered in libraries, museums, living rooms, and churches to participate in an annual civic ritual called the People’s State of the Union. Initiated in 2015 by the United States Department of Arts and Culture, a non government organization, the weeklong event invites hundreds of communities nationwide to gather and create Story Circles, where individuals share their thoughts and reflections on the state of the nation.

Judy D’Mello
January 2, 2018
Bob Martin, a member of the New York Police Department from 1968 to 2000, has written “Bronx Justice,” an N.Y.P.D. novel set in 1990s, not a decade for the dainty.

A year-end headline in The New York Times last week read “Crime in New York City Plunges to a Level Not Seen Since the 1950s.” The number of killings in 2016 was 236, according to the report.

“That would have been a good month in the ’90s,” said Bob Martin, a member of the New York Police Department from 1968 to 2000, and now the author of “Bronx Justice,” an N.Y.P.D. novel set in 1990s, which was certainly not a decade for the dainty.

Jennifer Landes
December 26, 2017
Isolation and a high school class in photography would become instrumental in developing Aneta Bartos’s artistic voice, one that has gained much attention in the past couple of years.

Having lived her entire childhood in Poland, Aneta Bartos came to the United States at 16, not knowing a word of English. Going to school in the Canarsie section of Brooklyn, “I felt I was mute. I couldn’t interact with my peers.”

It took a long and “not pleasurable” time for her to master English. That isolation and a high school class in photography would become instrumental in developing her artistic voice, one that has gained much attention in the past couple of years.

Jennifer Landes
December 20, 2017
“From Lens to Eye to Hand: Photorealism 1969 to Today” at the Parrish Art Museum has taken a critical hit in some quarters, some of it deserved and some less so.

“From Lens to Eye to Hand: Photorealism 1969 to Today” at the Parrish Art Museum has taken a critical hit in some quarters, some of it deserved and some less so. 

This presentation of the movement, which has had a far longer appeal to artists than many might otherwise assume, demonstrates a five-decade siren call to those who have appreciated the inherent complexities and challenges in the genre.

Christopher Walsh
December 13, 2017
The trio has performed together in one form or another for 25 years. Between them, their credits comprise a seemingly comprehensive directory of the groups that entertain patrons of the East End’s bars, restaurants, and wineries.

A unique sound that has been quietly percolating for a few years on the South Fork music scene is now bubbling to the surface.

On a recent Saturday afternoon, before a 5 o’clock soundcheck curtailed their rehearsal, the Unsung Heroes stretched out on compositions by revered musicians including Jaco Pastorius, Chick Corea, and Pat Metheny, along with several of their own. The music is complex and dynamic, but the players deftly keep up, complementing one another in a demonstration of the kind of telepathy that comes only with time and talent.

The Unsung Heroes — Peter (Bosco) Michne, Michael LeClerc, and James Benard — will take their sound to the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett on Dec. 29 at 8 p.m.

Mark Segal
November 16, 2017
A new opera by Victoria Bond celebrates an early radical feminist whose story has ties to East Hampton through Henry Ward Beecher, the son of Lyman Beecher.

The names most commonly associated with women’s suffrage are Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The History Channel’s website lists three other “Women Who Fought for the Vote”: Alice Paul, Lucy Stone, and Ida B. Wells. While that article doesn’t claim exclusivity for those five, it is curious that it doesn’t include Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for president of the United States — in 1872!

That would not surprise Victoria Bond, the East Hampton composer and conductor whose opera “Mrs. President” will be presented by the Rochester Lyric Opera on Saturday in celebration of the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote in New York State.

David E. Rattray
November 9, 2017
A rare copy of the Declaration of Independence and a group of papers, both related to the Mulford family and the history of East Hampton, will hit the auction block in Potsdam, N.Y. on Saturday.

A copy of the 1776 Declaration of Independence that was passed down through descendants of Col. David Mulford, an East Hampton man who led a regiment at the time of the American Revolution, is about as rare a document related to the birth of the United States as is known. 

Out of an edition of 500 printed by John Holt on July 9, 1776, in White Plains, only 5 copies are thought to have survived. It will be sold at auction, along with a collection of early papers related to the history of East Hampton, on Saturday by Blanchard’s Auction Service in Potsdam, N.Y.

Blanchard’s has set a pre-auction estimate of $500,000 to $1 million for Colonel Mulford’s Declaration and between $25,000 and $50,000 for the family papers.

Mark Segal
November 1, 2017
Hugh Patrick Brown, a retired photojournalist, has been to Northern Ireland, China, and Cambodia, but at his East Hampton residence he recalled his first assignment for People magazine.

An hour with the retired photojournalist Hugh Patrick Brown is an hour entertainingly spent. While his career as a photojournalist for Time Life took him to some far-flung and unusual locations, Northern Ireland, China, and Cambodia among them, during a conversation at his East Hampton residence he recalled his first assignment for People magazine.

“They had shut down Life and started People, and within about six weeks they sent me to Ohio to photograph a chicken flying contest. Every year they mount these mailboxes open at both ends on a grassy hill, put the chickens in, and push them out with plungers. The stuff you remember. . . .”

Mark Segal
October 19, 2017
Michael Disher reflects on a long career in theater and the past 10 years at the Southampton Cultural Center.

Michael Disher is quick to acknowledge his good fortune. “Outside of my first job interview in New York in 1977, I’ve maybe interviewed for jobs twice in my life. Otherwise I’ve been in the right place at the right time, and they’ve just come my way.”

The right places have included Southampton College, where he taught drama for more than 15 years, and the Southampton Cultural Center, where he opened Center Stage Theatre, which tomorrow is launching its 10th season as Southampton Village’s only year-round community theater with the classic farce “Boeing Boeing.”

Mark Segal
October 12, 2017
Although Sue Heatley had been making art for most of her life, the South Fork’s history as an art colony was not the reason she moved from Richmond, Va., to Springs in 2004.

Although Sue Heatley had been making art for most of her life, the South Fork’s history as an art colony was not the reason she moved from Richmond, Va., to Springs in 2004. “I didn’t make much art the first year I was here, and I wasn’t connected to other artists. I was going through a divorce and trying to figure out who I was and what I wanted to spend my time doing.” 

Things changed in 2007, when she began working at the Drawing Room Gallery in East Hampton. Among the artists it represents are John Alexander, Jennifer Bartlett, Bryan Hunt, Dan Rizzie, Toni Ross, Jack Yougerman . . . and, since 2014, Ms. Heatley. A solo show of her recent work will open there on Friday, Oct. 20. 

Christopher Walsh
October 5, 2017
Over a plate of clams on the half shell at Gosman's Top Side, Jack Douglas shared epic tales of musical genius, and sometimes madness, working on albums by artists such as John Lennon and Aerosmith as a producer at the Record Plant Studios in New York.

Sitting at Gosman’s Topside restaurant, overlooking Montauk Harbor on a perfect September afternoon, the stories flowed from Jack Douglas like the tide, epic tales of musical genius, and sometimes madness. Between a plate of clams on the half shell, the music producer best known for long and close associations with John Lennon and Aerosmith recalled a lifetime of creation, onstage and, especially, in the studio.

“You’re facilitating a dream,” Mr. Douglas said of his work. “You may have to write, you may have to rewrite, you have to arrange most of the time. You’re dealing with tremendous egos, some problem children, some people that are just blessed with talent, and a lot of other things.”

Mark Segal
September 21, 2017
Kenny Mann's “Naisula — A Prayer for a White Woman, Her African Servant, a Shaman, and a Spirit Child,” an epic poem, will be staged for a performance at Guild Hall on Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m. as part of the venue’s JDT Lab.

Kenny Mann was born in Kenya in 1946 and lived there until she graduated from the University of Nairobi in 1968, when she “left Kenya for good,” according to her website. If you read only that statement, you might not realize that the filmmaker and writer has never really left, at least not in the ways that really matter.

“My brother Oscar lives there, and I try to go back every year,” she said during a recent conversation at her house in Sag Harbor. Not only was her brother there for a visit, so was Nickson Parmisa, a Maasai chief from Kitengela, a village approximately 20 miles from Nairobi and close by the farm on which Ms. Mann grew up.

Jennifer Landes
September 18, 2017
By the time it closes on Oct. 9, the Hamptons International Film Festival will have screened 65 feature and 50 short films from 40 countries.

When the curtain falls on the 25th Hamptons International Film Festival on Columbus Day, it will have screened 65 features and 50 shorts, hosted several conversations with actors and filmmakers, toasted Julie Andrews, and much more. 

After weeks of offering glimpses of highlights in scattered press releases, the festival announced its full schedule on Monday, including its closing night film, "I, Tonya," about Tonya Harding, the notorious figure skater who was involved in a plot to break the leg of Nancy Kerrigan, one of her 1994 Olympics teammates. The film stars Margot Robbie and Allison Janney and was directed by Craig Gillespie. 

Mark Segal
September 7, 2017
Delaney Colaio was one of 3,051 young people who lost a parent on Sept. 11, 2001. Now 18 and a freshman in college, she is a co-writer and co-director of “We Go Higher,” a documentary by and about the surviving children of the attacks.

Delaney Colaio was one of 3,051 young people who lost a parent on Sept. 11, 2001; she was 3 years old at the time. Now 18 and a freshman at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., she is a co-writer and co-director of “We Go Higher,” the first documentary by and about the surviving children of the 9/11 attacks.

Ms. Colaio, whose family has deep roots in Montauk, was inspired to pursue the project when she met Sara Bordo, an entertainment industry executive who founded Women Rising, an organization whose mission is to create content that empowers women and girls.

Christopher Walsh
August 31, 2017
As summer winds down, one of the South Fork’s many “must” events happens tomorrow at 8 p.m. at Guild Hall in East Hampton when the musician Taylor Barton and the guitarist G.E. Smith present the next in their “Portraits” series, featuring Mr. Smith in performance and conversation with Billy Squier.

As summer winds down, one of the South Fork’s many “must” events happens tomorrow at 8 p.m. at Guild Hall in East Hampton when the musician Taylor Barton and the guitarist G.E. Smith present the next in their “Portraits” series, featuring Mr. Smith in performance and conversation with Billy Squier. 

“Portraits” offers a rare opportunity to see and hear a renowned artist in an informal and intimate setting. Mr. Smith and Mr. Squier, who has released more than a dozen studio and live albums including 1981’s “Don’t Say No” and, the following year, “Emotions in Motion,” will sing, play guitars, and talk about the latter’s career in music. 

Mark Segal
August 24, 2017
Donald Lipski's stockpiling days are over now that he works almost exclusively on public art projects. “I still make things,” he said, “but not very much."

During the summers, which the artists Donald Lipski and Terry Hyland spend at their house in the Amagansett dunes, his studio consists of a desk and computer inside a tent. It’s a far cry from his old workspace in Greenpoint, a former movie theater and factory. “I had 3,000 feet of metal shelving there,” Mr. Lipski said during a recent conversation on his patio.

That was when he stockpiled materials found on the streets near his loft on Greenwich and Canal Streets. “I would pass Dumpsters that were full of stuff from some factory or warehouse that was closing. I started taking the stuff up to my loft and making things that  were fed by those materials.” 

Mark Segal
August 17, 2017
In 2015, the Off Broadway Alliance bestowed on Robert Kalfin its Legend of Off Broadway award, other recipients of which have included Edward Albee, A.R. Gurney, Wallace Shawn, Terrence McNally, Estelle Parsons, Andre Gregory, Athol Fugard, and Harvey Fierstein.

“Legendary” is a word sometimes used inexactly, but in the case of Robert Kalfin, it fits. 

In 2015, the Off Broadway Alliance bestowed on Mr. Kalfin its Legend of Off Broadway award, other recipients of which have included Edward Albee, A.R. Gurney, Wallace Shawn, Terrence McNally, Estelle Parsons, Andre Gregory, Athol Fugard, and Harvey Fierstein.

Jennifer Landes
August 10, 2017
A stand of three trees encased in steel cages wrapped in hemp twine at LongHouse Reserve are the latest manifestations of the ascendancy of the artistic career of Toni Ross.

In a stand of three trees just past the pond at East Hampton’s LongHouse Reserve, what appear to be cubic hives have gathered around each of the trunks. Too sculptural and hard-edged to be perceived as organic, the layers of hemp twine wrapped around steel frames still seem perfectly suited to the environment, as if they were spontaneous manifestations of an atomic force or a giant caterpillar’s Euclidian chrysalis.

Judy D’Mello
August 3, 2017
With its $200 per week classes, the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, also known as the Art Barge, could easily be one of the most un-Hamptons places on the South Fork.

“It’s as far from 53rd Street as you can get,” Victor D’Amico once said about the Art Barge on Napeague Harbor, which he founded in 1963, most likely referring to the spiritual distance between the beached idyll for artists and midtown Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art, where he served as director of education for over 30 years.

Standing on the sun-bleached deck of the isolated barge, officially known as the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, facing the bay’s gentle silver ripples with the high rise of the ocean dunes looming behind, it feels even farther away today from the surrounding hype of a South Fork summer. In fact, it could easily top a list of the most un-Hamptons of places in the Hamptons.

Jennifer Landes
July 27, 2017
“Avedon’s America,” images that reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century, will soon grace Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.

For several months, a scale model of Guild Hall’s galleries has existed on a table in New York City. Arrayed across the Foamcore walls are the tiny faces of world leaders, artists, fashion models, actors, slaughterhouse workers, civil rights leaders, pundits, singers, and more.

Captured by the photographer Richard Avedon, the images reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century. “Avedon’s America,” the exhibition that today exists only in miniature, will soon grace the actual plaster walls of Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.