Recent Stories: Lead C

Jennifer Landes
August 10, 2017
A stand of three trees encased in steel cages wrapped in hemp twine at LongHouse Reserve are the latest manifestations of the ascendancy of the artistic career of Toni Ross.

In a stand of three trees just past the pond at East Hampton’s LongHouse Reserve, what appear to be cubic hives have gathered around each of the trunks. Too sculptural and hard-edged to be perceived as organic, the layers of hemp twine wrapped around steel frames still seem perfectly suited to the environment, as if they were spontaneous manifestations of an atomic force or a giant caterpillar’s Euclidian chrysalis.

Judy D’Mello
August 3, 2017
With its $200 per week classes, the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, also known as the Art Barge, could easily be one of the most un-Hamptons places on the South Fork.

“It’s as far from 53rd Street as you can get,” Victor D’Amico once said about the Art Barge on Napeague Harbor, which he founded in 1963, most likely referring to the spiritual distance between the beached idyll for artists and midtown Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art, where he served as director of education for over 30 years.

Standing on the sun-bleached deck of the isolated barge, officially known as the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, facing the bay’s gentle silver ripples with the high rise of the ocean dunes looming behind, it feels even farther away today from the surrounding hype of a South Fork summer. In fact, it could easily top a list of the most un-Hamptons of places in the Hamptons.

Jennifer Landes
July 27, 2017
“Avedon’s America,” images that reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century, will soon grace Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.

For several months, a scale model of Guild Hall’s galleries has existed on a table in New York City. Arrayed across the Foamcore walls are the tiny faces of world leaders, artists, fashion models, actors, slaughterhouse workers, civil rights leaders, pundits, singers, and more.

Captured by the photographer Richard Avedon, the images reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century. “Avedon’s America,” the exhibition that today exists only in miniature, will soon grace the actual plaster walls of Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.

Judy D’Mello
July 20, 2017
“Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life,” the poet laureate Robert Southey informed Charlotte Bronte when she sent him her poems, along with her sibling Anne’s writing, to critique. The Brontes went on, quite efficiently, to make it their business.

“Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life,” the poet laureate Robert Southey informed Charlotte Bronte when she sent him her poems, along with her sibling Anne’s writing, to critique. The Brontes went on, quite efficiently, to make it their business.

Almost 200 years later, a pair of writerly sisters here are making it theirs, too. Carrie Doyle and Elizabeth Doyle Carey have launched Dunemere Books, a small press described on the company’s website as “offering fresh and original fiction series for tweens, teens, and adults — novels for people who want to get away from it all, whether virtually or actually.” Unlike their predecessors, however, the Doyle sisters are already best-selling authors. 

Jennifer Landes
July 13, 2017
Yung Jake Patterson is bringing his emoji.ink paintings to the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton.

Last week in the back room of the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton, a discussion was taking place between brothers. How, Tripoli Patterson asked his younger brother, Jake Patterson, were they going to describe his artworks that will be on view in the gallery starting tomorrow.

The answer‚ “digital paintings,” is certainly accurate and straightforward. Yet it is lacking as a complete description for the hybrid form born of a digital application called emoji.ink, which can be used to draw or paint images made completely out of emojis. The app was created by Vince McKelvie, Jake’s friend and business partner in a design company called Tig.ht Corp.

Mark Segal
July 6, 2017
Strange, almost surreal forms are central to Deborah Buck's paintings, so they aren’t resolutely abstract. But, with a few exceptions, they are not figurative either--except perhaps in her head, where magic is the norm.

When a retrospective of Deborah Buck’s paintings was held in 2012 at the Garrison Art Center in Garrison, N.Y., several people told her that they resembled her work from 20 years before.

While there is definitely a consistency over the years, it’s like quicksilver — difficult to pin down. Because strange, almost surreal forms are central to her paintings, they aren’t resolutely abstract. At the same time, with a few exceptions, they are not figurative either — except perhaps in her head, where magic is the norm. 

“I make images of things I wish existed. Like nature on steroids. It’s like making a world where I can live, a world a little more interesting to me than one without them.”

Mark Segal
June 29, 2017
“Inconceivable,” Jonathan Baker's first feature film as director, which stars Nicholas Cage, Gina Gershon, and Faye Dunaway, will be released nationally tomorrow. The culmination of his career so far, it did not come to fruition easily.

Jonathan Baker is nothing if not resourceful. A film director and writer, he didn’t just wait it out when a writer’s strike crippled the industry in the 1980s. Instead he asked himself what he could provide for the citizens of Hollywood that they didn’t already have. 

A longtime lover of sulphur baths and road trips, he had relaxed for 30 years in the same hot tub at Esalen Institute in Big Sur as Steve McQueen. A photograph of the movie star in that tub hangs in the dining room in the Maidstone Hotel in East Hampton, which Mr. Baker owns with his wife, Jenny Ljungberg. 

Jennifer Landes
June 22, 2017
Janice Stanton took a long journey to arrive at her current place, one that moved through dance, intellectual property law, photography, and filmmaking.

On a torrentially rainy and windswept spring afternoon in New York City, Janice Stanton’s apartment was a warm and quiet refuge. In a long and low renovated Gothic-style stone building, one of the oldest in Chelsea, her rambling flat was modern and cozy, tonal and bright.

Perched on bookshelves and windowsills and set out on a long table were the products of five years of artistic labor, collages she has created as part of series and as stand-alone pieces. 

Christopher Walsh
June 15, 2017
Drew Petersen, a part-time Springs resident and a prodigy who first performed at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall at age 5, won the American Pianists Award and the Christel DeHaan Fellowship of the American Pianists Association.

There may be fewer days at the beach for Drew Petersen, a resident of Springs and Oradell, N.J. 

In April, at age 23, Mr. Petersen, a prodigy who first performed at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall at age 5, won the American Pianists Award and the Christel DeHaan Fellowship of the American Pianists Association. He has also been named artist-in-residence for two years at the University of Indianapolis, where the association is based, starting in the fall. 

Mark Segal
June 8, 2017
E.T. Williams, a retired, well-to-do real estate investor, and Claude Lawrence, an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter came to know each other through the extended African-American community in Sag Harbor and changed each other's lives for the better.

How the lives of a retired, well-to-do real estate investor and an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter briefly converged, and how that meeting dramatically invigorated the painter’s career, tell a story about African-American art and Sag Harbor’s African-American community.

E.T. Williams Jr. told the story to a visitor on a sunny afternoon at his family compound in Sag Harbor. Now 79, Mr. Williams has been coming to Sag Harbor since he was a child. His father bought the modest house next to Mr. Williams’s own in 1933. 

Mark Segal
June 1, 2017
A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Larry Rivers’s works with Jewish themes.

Larry Rivers was a remarkably prolific and protean artist, not to mention an accomplished jazz musician, poet, actor, filmmaker, writer, and teacher. His curiosity was boundless, and the provocative and often humorous nature of his art belied the seriousness of his commitment to research.

A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Rivers’s works with Jewish themes. According to Mindy Cantor, who organized the show with Ann Chwatsky, “Larry had been involved with Jewish life and culture for most of his life.” 

Jennifer Landes
May 25, 2017
It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

Almost two years ago, when Ms. Appelhof announced her retirement from Guild Hall, she told The Star that she wanted to revisit some interviews she had taped during a summer she spent with Lee Krasner.

Jennifer Landes
May 18, 2017
The boat hull and spinnaker Roy Lichtenstein designed for the 1995 America's Cup races will be the subject of an exhibition opening at the Middlebury College Museum of Art on May 26.

Coming upon the brightly painted boat hull mounted on a tiny island at the Storm King Art Center, the uninitiated might quickly identify the comic-book style of Roy Lichtenstein, but its otherwise mysterious presence prompts more questions than it answers.

Mark Segal
May 11, 2017
After a 30-year hiatus as a cabinetmaker, Mark Webber, a Sag Harbor resident, returned to sculpture.

Mark Webber is partial to rectangles. For his senior exhibition at SUNY Purchase, “I did all rectangles,” he recalled during a recent visit to his woodworking shop in Wainscott. 

After graduation, in 1980, he moved to a loft in SoHo to pursue a career as a sculptor. 

Judy D’Mello
May 4, 2017
One writer's endurance trial in witnessing the full program of new play readings at Bay Street Theater

Theater only works if it is seen. It needs an audience, but an audience suggests passivity, as in filmgoing. You can watch a film any time, even one with a dead actor, and it makes no difference. You can always see Lawrence Olivier in the movie version of “Othello.” But you could never witness his monolithic performance at the Royal Court Theatre unless you had been there.

Mark Segal
April 27, 2017
Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it. Now she is capturing the melt-off of Icelandic glaciers.

Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it.

Mark Segal
April 20, 2017
Guild Hall’s artist-in-residence program was launched in March 2016 because Ruth Appelhof, then the executive director, and the painter Eric Fischl felt that rising property values were making it difficult for young artists to live and work on the East End. Measured by any yardstick, the program has been a success.

Guild Hall’s artist-in-residence program was launched in March 2016 because Ruth Appelhof, then the executive director, and the painter Eric Fischl felt that rising property values were making it difficult for young artists to live and work on the East End. Measured by any yardstick, the program has been a success.

Kurt Wenzel
April 13, 2017
Alec Baldwin's memoir is more rueful than contentious, and intermittently evocative and wise.

“Nevertheless”
Alec Baldwin
Harper, $28.99

Jennifer Landes
April 6, 2017
For more than a decade, Eric Dever employed a square canvas and a limited palette in his painting. Those familiar with those works will find his latest paintings very different and surprising.

For more than a decade, Eric Dever employed the same idiom in his painting, with a square canvas and a limited palette. It served him well, with many group and solo exhibitions both locally and internationally.

Mark Segal
March 30, 2017
"We bring in people who are wine educators," Chimene Macnaughton said of the workshops at Wainscott Main Wine and Spirits, "but we make it super-democratic. We want it to be welcoming even if all you know is that you like white wine."

On a recent Wednesday evening at Wainscott Main Wine and Spirits, more than 30 people crowded around a large, L-shaped table listening to Bryan Tierce, a principal of Oro de Lidia tequila, talk about tequila and mezcal. In front of each participant tiny plastic cups sat on a placemat that identified each libation. Judging from the questions, some were novices, others more experienced, and Mr.

Mark Segal
March 23, 2017
Since she began taking photographs almost 40 years ago, Joanna McCarthy has exhibited her work widely, won numerous prizes and awards, and been published in many magazines. However, prior to that career, she led another life in front of the camera as a model with the Wilhelmina and Ford agencies and was photographed by such luminaries as Irving Penn, Hiro, and Saul Leiter. For a number of years, the two careers coincided.

Since she began taking photographs almost 40 years ago, Joanna McCarthy has exhibited her work widely, won numerous prizes and awards, and been published in many magazines. However, prior to that career, she led another life in front of th

Christopher Walsh
March 16, 2017
The long winter will finally be over on Tuesday, recent weather conditions notwithstanding. Regardless of the outdoor temperature on Tuesday night, those seeking a respite from winter’s bleakness and the attendant cabin fever are advised to visit Pierre’s in Bridgehampton.

The long winter will finally be over on Tuesday, recent weather conditions notwithstanding. Regardless of the outdoor temperature on Tuesday night, those seeking a respite from winter’s bleakness and the attendant cabin fever are advised to visit Pierre’s in Bridgehampton. 

Mark Segal
March 9, 2017
If all goes well for Lucia Davis, a refurbished school bus will depart from Greenport this summer, but not with schoolchildren aboard. Instead it will be a traveling showcase of art and artists that will hold collaborative events at each stop along the Eastern Seaboard.

If all goes well for Lucia Davis, a refurbished school bus will depart from Greenport this summer, but not with schoolchildren aboard. Instead it will be a traveling showcase of art and artists that will hold collaborative events at each stop along the Eastern Seaboard.

Jennifer Landes
March 1, 2017
Playing a psychiatrist in David Mamet's new play, “The Penitent,” Chris Bauer must wrestle with religion, the press, and the legal system as well as "the athletic technical demands" of the play.

The institutions David Mamet skewers in his new play, “The Penitent” — religion, the press, and the legal system — are all modern in their form. Yet, Chris Bauer, who has the starring role, said last week that the inherent conflicts in the play derive from classical sources.