Recent Stories: Lead C

Mark Segal
June 8, 2017
E.T. Williams, a retired, well-to-do real estate investor, and Claude Lawrence, an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter came to know each other through the extended African-American community in Sag Harbor and changed each other's lives for the better.

How the lives of a retired, well-to-do real estate investor and an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter briefly converged, and how that meeting dramatically invigorated the painter’s career, tell a story about African-American art and Sag Harbor’s African-American community.

E.T. Williams Jr. told the story to a visitor on a sunny afternoon at his family compound in Sag Harbor. Now 79, Mr. Williams has been coming to Sag Harbor since he was a child. His father bought the modest house next to Mr. Williams’s own in 1933. 

Mark Segal
June 1, 2017
A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Larry Rivers’s works with Jewish themes.

Larry Rivers was a remarkably prolific and protean artist, not to mention an accomplished jazz musician, poet, actor, filmmaker, writer, and teacher. His curiosity was boundless, and the provocative and often humorous nature of his art belied the seriousness of his commitment to research.

A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Rivers’s works with Jewish themes. According to Mindy Cantor, who organized the show with Ann Chwatsky, “Larry had been involved with Jewish life and culture for most of his life.” 

Jennifer Landes
May 25, 2017
It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

Almost two years ago, when Ms. Appelhof announced her retirement from Guild Hall, she told The Star that she wanted to revisit some interviews she had taped during a summer she spent with Lee Krasner.

Jennifer Landes
May 18, 2017
The boat hull and spinnaker Roy Lichtenstein designed for the 1995 America's Cup races will be the subject of an exhibition opening at the Middlebury College Museum of Art on May 26.

Coming upon the brightly painted boat hull mounted on a tiny island at the Storm King Art Center, the uninitiated might quickly identify the comic-book style of Roy Lichtenstein, but its otherwise mysterious presence prompts more questions than it answers.

Mark Segal
May 11, 2017
After a 30-year hiatus as a cabinetmaker, Mark Webber, a Sag Harbor resident, returned to sculpture.

Mark Webber is partial to rectangles. For his senior exhibition at SUNY Purchase, “I did all rectangles,” he recalled during a recent visit to his woodworking shop in Wainscott. 

After graduation, in 1980, he moved to a loft in SoHo to pursue a career as a sculptor. 

Judy D’Mello
May 4, 2017
One writer's endurance trial in witnessing the full program of new play readings at Bay Street Theater

Theater only works if it is seen. It needs an audience, but an audience suggests passivity, as in filmgoing. You can watch a film any time, even one with a dead actor, and it makes no difference. You can always see Lawrence Olivier in the movie version of “Othello.” But you could never witness his monolithic performance at the Royal Court Theatre unless you had been there.

Mark Segal
April 27, 2017
Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it. Now she is capturing the melt-off of Icelandic glaciers.

Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it.

Mark Segal
April 20, 2017
Guild Hall’s artist-in-residence program was launched in March 2016 because Ruth Appelhof, then the executive director, and the painter Eric Fischl felt that rising property values were making it difficult for young artists to live and work on the East End. Measured by any yardstick, the program has been a success.

Guild Hall’s artist-in-residence program was launched in March 2016 because Ruth Appelhof, then the executive director, and the painter Eric Fischl felt that rising property values were making it difficult for young artists to live and work on the East End. Measured by any yardstick, the program has been a success.

Kurt Wenzel
April 13, 2017
Alec Baldwin's memoir is more rueful than contentious, and intermittently evocative and wise.

“Nevertheless”
Alec Baldwin
Harper, $28.99

Jennifer Landes
April 6, 2017
For more than a decade, Eric Dever employed a square canvas and a limited palette in his painting. Those familiar with those works will find his latest paintings very different and surprising.

For more than a decade, Eric Dever employed the same idiom in his painting, with a square canvas and a limited palette. It served him well, with many group and solo exhibitions both locally and internationally.

Mark Segal
March 30, 2017
"We bring in people who are wine educators," Chimene Macnaughton said of the workshops at Wainscott Main Wine and Spirits, "but we make it super-democratic. We want it to be welcoming even if all you know is that you like white wine."

On a recent Wednesday evening at Wainscott Main Wine and Spirits, more than 30 people crowded around a large, L-shaped table listening to Bryan Tierce, a principal of Oro de Lidia tequila, talk about tequila and mezcal. In front of each participant tiny plastic cups sat on a placemat that identified each libation. Judging from the questions, some were novices, others more experienced, and Mr.

Mark Segal
March 23, 2017
Since she began taking photographs almost 40 years ago, Joanna McCarthy has exhibited her work widely, won numerous prizes and awards, and been published in many magazines. However, prior to that career, she led another life in front of the camera as a model with the Wilhelmina and Ford agencies and was photographed by such luminaries as Irving Penn, Hiro, and Saul Leiter. For a number of years, the two careers coincided.

Since she began taking photographs almost 40 years ago, Joanna McCarthy has exhibited her work widely, won numerous prizes and awards, and been published in many magazines. However, prior to that career, she led another life in front of th

Christopher Walsh
March 16, 2017
The long winter will finally be over on Tuesday, recent weather conditions notwithstanding. Regardless of the outdoor temperature on Tuesday night, those seeking a respite from winter’s bleakness and the attendant cabin fever are advised to visit Pierre’s in Bridgehampton.

The long winter will finally be over on Tuesday, recent weather conditions notwithstanding. Regardless of the outdoor temperature on Tuesday night, those seeking a respite from winter’s bleakness and the attendant cabin fever are advised to visit Pierre’s in Bridgehampton. 

Mark Segal
March 9, 2017
If all goes well for Lucia Davis, a refurbished school bus will depart from Greenport this summer, but not with schoolchildren aboard. Instead it will be a traveling showcase of art and artists that will hold collaborative events at each stop along the Eastern Seaboard.

If all goes well for Lucia Davis, a refurbished school bus will depart from Greenport this summer, but not with schoolchildren aboard. Instead it will be a traveling showcase of art and artists that will hold collaborative events at each stop along the Eastern Seaboard.

Jennifer Landes
March 1, 2017
Playing a psychiatrist in David Mamet's new play, “The Penitent,” Chris Bauer must wrestle with religion, the press, and the legal system as well as "the athletic technical demands" of the play.

The institutions David Mamet skewers in his new play, “The Penitent” — religion, the press, and the legal system — are all modern in their form. Yet, Chris Bauer, who has the starring role, said last week that the inherent conflicts in the play derive from classical sources.

Jennifer Landes
February 16, 2017
Jenno Topping’s commitment to mentor and support women in film has led to one of her most noteworthy and lauded achievements to date: helping to bring “Hidden Figures” to the screen.

Jenno Topping’s career in the film industry has been defined by her work with women. In films such as “Spy,” “Charlie’s Angels,” “Heat,” “28 Days,” and many more, she has sought out female directors and fellow producers, writers, production staff, and plots driven by female characters. 

Mark Segal
February 9, 2017
Anne Raymond has been an abstract painter since college, but her work changed after she was exposed to the light and physical presence of East Hampton, where she and her husband, Ken Olson, have lived for 23 years.

Anne Raymond destroyed nine of her paintings on New Year’s Day in 2000, “the first day of the new century,” as she put it.

“I had forgotten that the way I can be most successful is to paint light to dark,” she told a recent visitor to her spacious studio in Northwest Woods. “I had let those canvases get dark too soon.”

Jennifer Landes
February 1, 2017
Libraries used to be repositories of books and collections that were held close, in some cases available only to preapproved researchers by appointment. The East Hampton Library is embracing a more contemporary model, wherein its collection is accessible to researchers in their homes and offices.

Libraries used to be repositories of books and collections that were held close, in some cases available only to preapproved researchers by appointment. The East Hampton Library is embracing a more contemporary model, wherein its collection is accessible to researchers in their homes and offices. 

Irene Silverman
January 26, 2017
What Sotheby’s called “the Schellinger-Hendrickson Very Fine and Rare Clock,” a tall-case beauty made by the East Hampton craftsman Nathaniel Dominy IV in 1780, was sold Saturday afternoon at the auction house’s Manhattan headquarters for $24,000 to an unknown buyer bidding by telephone.

What Sotheby’s called “the Schellinger-Hendrickson Very Fine and Rare Clock,” a tall-case beauty made by the East Hampton craftsman Nathaniel Dominy IV in 1780, was sold Saturday afternoon at the auction house’s Manhattan headquarters for $24,000 to an unknown buyer bidding by telephone.

Mark Segal
January 19, 2017
The sculptor Paul Pavia grew up surrounded by art. His father, Philip Pavia, was a sculptor, and his mother, Natalie Edgar, is a painter.

The sculptor Paul Pavia grew up surrounded by art. His father, Philip Pavia, was a sculptor, and his mother, Natalie Edgar, is a painter. Starting in 1986 when he was 15 years old, their son spent 12 summers in Pietrasanta, Italy, a Tuscan town that has drawn artists for centuries to its marble studios and foundries.

Jennifer Landes
January 5, 2017
“I like the idea of asking the viewer to think, but only for the process of thinking, rather than a specific idea,” he said. “I want my paintings to elicit that.”

Until recently, Matt Vega’s deck was home to a giant 10-by-18-foot canvas on a stretcher, hooked on to the exterior of his house in Amagansett’s Devon Colony so the winds off the bay wouldn’t blow it away. “Xenotropic Panspermia” is a work in progress and a kind of magnum opus. He now has it rolled up in a 10-foot PVC pipe, where it will spend the winter.

Jennifer Landes
December 29, 2016
Now in its 12th year, the Tripoli Gallery “Thanksgiving Collective” has become a holiday season institution on the South Fork.

Now in its 12th year, the Tripoli Gallery “Thanksgiving Collective” has become a holiday season institution on the South Fork. 

Christopher Walsh
December 22, 2016
“Dreaming in Vinyl,” Caroline Doctorow’s latest release, is a fitting metaphor for the approach she has taken to a life in music. With songs by the likes of Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Donovan, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and Randy Newman, as well as two of her own, the collection recalls the pop-music and folk revival’s peak years in the 1960s.

“Dreaming in Vinyl,” Caroline Doctorow’s latest release, is a fitting metaphor for the approach she has taken to a life in music. With songs by the likes of Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Donovan, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, and Randy Newman, as well as two of her own, the collection recalls the pop-music and folk revival’s peak years in the 1960s. 

Mark Segal
December 15, 2016
The artistic career of Phyllis Hammond, a Springs sculptor, began almost 80 years ago when, as an 8-year-old, she took a one-hour train trip all by herself from Melrose, Mass., to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to sketch the Greek and Roman sculptures there. Not too much has fazed her since then.

The artistic career of Phyllis Hammond, a Springs sculptor, began almost 80 years ago when, as an 8-year-old, she took a one-hour train trip all by herself from Melrose, Mass., to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston to sketch the Greek and Roman sculptures there. Not too much has fazed her since then.