Recent Stories: Lead C

Mark Segal
October 12, 2017
Although Sue Heatley had been making art for most of her life, the South Fork’s history as an art colony was not the reason she moved from Richmond, Va., to Springs in 2004.

Although Sue Heatley had been making art for most of her life, the South Fork’s history as an art colony was not the reason she moved from Richmond, Va., to Springs in 2004. “I didn’t make much art the first year I was here, and I wasn’t connected to other artists. I was going through a divorce and trying to figure out who I was and what I wanted to spend my time doing.” 

Things changed in 2007, when she began working at the Drawing Room Gallery in East Hampton. Among the artists it represents are John Alexander, Jennifer Bartlett, Bryan Hunt, Dan Rizzie, Toni Ross, Jack Yougerman . . . and, since 2014, Ms. Heatley. A solo show of her recent work will open there on Friday, Oct. 20. 

Christopher Walsh
October 5, 2017
Over a plate of clams on the half shell at Gosman's Top Side, Jack Douglas shared epic tales of musical genius, and sometimes madness, working on albums by artists such as John Lennon and Aerosmith as a producer at the Record Plant Studios in New York.

Sitting at Gosman’s Topside restaurant, overlooking Montauk Harbor on a perfect September afternoon, the stories flowed from Jack Douglas like the tide, epic tales of musical genius, and sometimes madness. Between a plate of clams on the half shell, the music producer best known for long and close associations with John Lennon and Aerosmith recalled a lifetime of creation, onstage and, especially, in the studio.

“You’re facilitating a dream,” Mr. Douglas said of his work. “You may have to write, you may have to rewrite, you have to arrange most of the time. You’re dealing with tremendous egos, some problem children, some people that are just blessed with talent, and a lot of other things.”

Mark Segal
September 21, 2017
Kenny Mann's “Naisula — A Prayer for a White Woman, Her African Servant, a Shaman, and a Spirit Child,” an epic poem, will be staged for a performance at Guild Hall on Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m. as part of the venue’s JDT Lab.

Kenny Mann was born in Kenya in 1946 and lived there until she graduated from the University of Nairobi in 1968, when she “left Kenya for good,” according to her website. If you read only that statement, you might not realize that the filmmaker and writer has never really left, at least not in the ways that really matter.

“My brother Oscar lives there, and I try to go back every year,” she said during a recent conversation at her house in Sag Harbor. Not only was her brother there for a visit, so was Nickson Parmisa, a Maasai chief from Kitengela, a village approximately 20 miles from Nairobi and close by the farm on which Ms. Mann grew up.

Jennifer Landes
September 18, 2017
By the time it closes on Oct. 9, the Hamptons International Film Festival will have screened 65 feature and 50 short films from 40 countries.

When the curtain falls on the 25th Hamptons International Film Festival on Columbus Day, it will have screened 65 features and 50 shorts, hosted several conversations with actors and filmmakers, toasted Julie Andrews, and much more. 

After weeks of offering glimpses of highlights in scattered press releases, the festival announced its full schedule on Monday, including its closing night film, "I, Tonya," about Tonya Harding, the notorious figure skater who was involved in a plot to break the leg of Nancy Kerrigan, one of her 1994 Olympics teammates. The film stars Margot Robbie and Allison Janney and was directed by Craig Gillespie. 

Mark Segal
September 7, 2017
Delaney Colaio was one of 3,051 young people who lost a parent on Sept. 11, 2001. Now 18 and a freshman in college, she is a co-writer and co-director of “We Go Higher,” a documentary by and about the surviving children of the attacks.

Delaney Colaio was one of 3,051 young people who lost a parent on Sept. 11, 2001; she was 3 years old at the time. Now 18 and a freshman at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn., she is a co-writer and co-director of “We Go Higher,” the first documentary by and about the surviving children of the 9/11 attacks.

Ms. Colaio, whose family has deep roots in Montauk, was inspired to pursue the project when she met Sara Bordo, an entertainment industry executive who founded Women Rising, an organization whose mission is to create content that empowers women and girls.

Christopher Walsh
August 31, 2017
As summer winds down, one of the South Fork’s many “must” events happens tomorrow at 8 p.m. at Guild Hall in East Hampton when the musician Taylor Barton and the guitarist G.E. Smith present the next in their “Portraits” series, featuring Mr. Smith in performance and conversation with Billy Squier.

As summer winds down, one of the South Fork’s many “must” events happens tomorrow at 8 p.m. at Guild Hall in East Hampton when the musician Taylor Barton and the guitarist G.E. Smith present the next in their “Portraits” series, featuring Mr. Smith in performance and conversation with Billy Squier. 

“Portraits” offers a rare opportunity to see and hear a renowned artist in an informal and intimate setting. Mr. Smith and Mr. Squier, who has released more than a dozen studio and live albums including 1981’s “Don’t Say No” and, the following year, “Emotions in Motion,” will sing, play guitars, and talk about the latter’s career in music. 

Mark Segal
August 24, 2017
Donald Lipski's stockpiling days are over now that he works almost exclusively on public art projects. “I still make things,” he said, “but not very much."

During the summers, which the artists Donald Lipski and Terry Hyland spend at their house in the Amagansett dunes, his studio consists of a desk and computer inside a tent. It’s a far cry from his old workspace in Greenpoint, a former movie theater and factory. “I had 3,000 feet of metal shelving there,” Mr. Lipski said during a recent conversation on his patio.

That was when he stockpiled materials found on the streets near his loft on Greenwich and Canal Streets. “I would pass Dumpsters that were full of stuff from some factory or warehouse that was closing. I started taking the stuff up to my loft and making things that  were fed by those materials.” 

Mark Segal
August 17, 2017
In 2015, the Off Broadway Alliance bestowed on Robert Kalfin its Legend of Off Broadway award, other recipients of which have included Edward Albee, A.R. Gurney, Wallace Shawn, Terrence McNally, Estelle Parsons, Andre Gregory, Athol Fugard, and Harvey Fierstein.

“Legendary” is a word sometimes used inexactly, but in the case of Robert Kalfin, it fits. 

In 2015, the Off Broadway Alliance bestowed on Mr. Kalfin its Legend of Off Broadway award, other recipients of which have included Edward Albee, A.R. Gurney, Wallace Shawn, Terrence McNally, Estelle Parsons, Andre Gregory, Athol Fugard, and Harvey Fierstein.

Jennifer Landes
August 10, 2017
A stand of three trees encased in steel cages wrapped in hemp twine at LongHouse Reserve are the latest manifestations of the ascendancy of the artistic career of Toni Ross.

In a stand of three trees just past the pond at East Hampton’s LongHouse Reserve, what appear to be cubic hives have gathered around each of the trunks. Too sculptural and hard-edged to be perceived as organic, the layers of hemp twine wrapped around steel frames still seem perfectly suited to the environment, as if they were spontaneous manifestations of an atomic force or a giant caterpillar’s Euclidian chrysalis.

Judy D’Mello
August 3, 2017
With its $200 per week classes, the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, also known as the Art Barge, could easily be one of the most un-Hamptons places on the South Fork.

“It’s as far from 53rd Street as you can get,” Victor D’Amico once said about the Art Barge on Napeague Harbor, which he founded in 1963, most likely referring to the spiritual distance between the beached idyll for artists and midtown Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art, where he served as director of education for over 30 years.

Standing on the sun-bleached deck of the isolated barge, officially known as the Victor D’Amico Institute of Art, facing the bay’s gentle silver ripples with the high rise of the ocean dunes looming behind, it feels even farther away today from the surrounding hype of a South Fork summer. In fact, it could easily top a list of the most un-Hamptons of places in the Hamptons.

Jennifer Landes
July 27, 2017
“Avedon’s America,” images that reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century, will soon grace Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.

For several months, a scale model of Guild Hall’s galleries has existed on a table in New York City. Arrayed across the Foamcore walls are the tiny faces of world leaders, artists, fashion models, actors, slaughterhouse workers, civil rights leaders, pundits, singers, and more.

Captured by the photographer Richard Avedon, the images reflect the unflagging interest of one man in the faces that defined the country and its values for more than half a century. “Avedon’s America,” the exhibition that today exists only in miniature, will soon grace the actual plaster walls of Guild Hall’s galleries with a gala opening tied to its annual benefit on Aug. 11.

Judy D’Mello
July 20, 2017
“Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life,” the poet laureate Robert Southey informed Charlotte Bronte when she sent him her poems, along with her sibling Anne’s writing, to critique. The Brontes went on, quite efficiently, to make it their business.

“Literature cannot be the business of a woman’s life,” the poet laureate Robert Southey informed Charlotte Bronte when she sent him her poems, along with her sibling Anne’s writing, to critique. The Brontes went on, quite efficiently, to make it their business.

Almost 200 years later, a pair of writerly sisters here are making it theirs, too. Carrie Doyle and Elizabeth Doyle Carey have launched Dunemere Books, a small press described on the company’s website as “offering fresh and original fiction series for tweens, teens, and adults — novels for people who want to get away from it all, whether virtually or actually.” Unlike their predecessors, however, the Doyle sisters are already best-selling authors. 

Jennifer Landes
July 13, 2017
Yung Jake Patterson is bringing his emoji.ink paintings to the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton.

Last week in the back room of the Tripoli Gallery in Southampton, a discussion was taking place between brothers. How, Tripoli Patterson asked his younger brother, Jake Patterson, were they going to describe his artworks that will be on view in the gallery starting tomorrow.

The answer‚ “digital paintings,” is certainly accurate and straightforward. Yet it is lacking as a complete description for the hybrid form born of a digital application called emoji.ink, which can be used to draw or paint images made completely out of emojis. The app was created by Vince McKelvie, Jake’s friend and business partner in a design company called Tig.ht Corp.

Mark Segal
July 6, 2017
Strange, almost surreal forms are central to Deborah Buck's paintings, so they aren’t resolutely abstract. But, with a few exceptions, they are not figurative either--except perhaps in her head, where magic is the norm.

When a retrospective of Deborah Buck’s paintings was held in 2012 at the Garrison Art Center in Garrison, N.Y., several people told her that they resembled her work from 20 years before.

While there is definitely a consistency over the years, it’s like quicksilver — difficult to pin down. Because strange, almost surreal forms are central to her paintings, they aren’t resolutely abstract. At the same time, with a few exceptions, they are not figurative either — except perhaps in her head, where magic is the norm. 

“I make images of things I wish existed. Like nature on steroids. It’s like making a world where I can live, a world a little more interesting to me than one without them.”

Mark Segal
June 29, 2017
“Inconceivable,” Jonathan Baker's first feature film as director, which stars Nicholas Cage, Gina Gershon, and Faye Dunaway, will be released nationally tomorrow. The culmination of his career so far, it did not come to fruition easily.

Jonathan Baker is nothing if not resourceful. A film director and writer, he didn’t just wait it out when a writer’s strike crippled the industry in the 1980s. Instead he asked himself what he could provide for the citizens of Hollywood that they didn’t already have. 

A longtime lover of sulphur baths and road trips, he had relaxed for 30 years in the same hot tub at Esalen Institute in Big Sur as Steve McQueen. A photograph of the movie star in that tub hangs in the dining room in the Maidstone Hotel in East Hampton, which Mr. Baker owns with his wife, Jenny Ljungberg. 

Jennifer Landes
June 22, 2017
Janice Stanton took a long journey to arrive at her current place, one that moved through dance, intellectual property law, photography, and filmmaking.

On a torrentially rainy and windswept spring afternoon in New York City, Janice Stanton’s apartment was a warm and quiet refuge. In a long and low renovated Gothic-style stone building, one of the oldest in Chelsea, her rambling flat was modern and cozy, tonal and bright.

Perched on bookshelves and windowsills and set out on a long table were the products of five years of artistic labor, collages she has created as part of series and as stand-alone pieces. 

Christopher Walsh
June 15, 2017
Drew Petersen, a part-time Springs resident and a prodigy who first performed at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall at age 5, won the American Pianists Award and the Christel DeHaan Fellowship of the American Pianists Association.

There may be fewer days at the beach for Drew Petersen, a resident of Springs and Oradell, N.J. 

In April, at age 23, Mr. Petersen, a prodigy who first performed at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall at age 5, won the American Pianists Award and the Christel DeHaan Fellowship of the American Pianists Association. He has also been named artist-in-residence for two years at the University of Indianapolis, where the association is based, starting in the fall. 

Mark Segal
June 8, 2017
E.T. Williams, a retired, well-to-do real estate investor, and Claude Lawrence, an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter came to know each other through the extended African-American community in Sag Harbor and changed each other's lives for the better.

How the lives of a retired, well-to-do real estate investor and an accomplished jazz-musician-turned-painter briefly converged, and how that meeting dramatically invigorated the painter’s career, tell a story about African-American art and Sag Harbor’s African-American community.

E.T. Williams Jr. told the story to a visitor on a sunny afternoon at his family compound in Sag Harbor. Now 79, Mr. Williams has been coming to Sag Harbor since he was a child. His father bought the modest house next to Mr. Williams’s own in 1933. 

Mark Segal
June 1, 2017
A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Larry Rivers’s works with Jewish themes.

Larry Rivers was a remarkably prolific and protean artist, not to mention an accomplished jazz musician, poet, actor, filmmaker, writer, and teacher. His curiosity was boundless, and the provocative and often humorous nature of his art belied the seriousness of his commitment to research.

A new exhibition at Temple Adas Israel, set to open Sunday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., will focus on Rivers’s works with Jewish themes. According to Mindy Cantor, who organized the show with Ann Chwatsky, “Larry had been involved with Jewish life and culture for most of his life.” 

Jennifer Landes
May 25, 2017
It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

It might seem odd that Ruth Appelhof is currently in Rome, assembling a book proposal on the American artist Lee Krasner. But most everything about the project embraces the improbable and the serendipitous.

Almost two years ago, when Ms. Appelhof announced her retirement from Guild Hall, she told The Star that she wanted to revisit some interviews she had taped during a summer she spent with Lee Krasner.

Jennifer Landes
May 18, 2017
The boat hull and spinnaker Roy Lichtenstein designed for the 1995 America's Cup races will be the subject of an exhibition opening at the Middlebury College Museum of Art on May 26.

Coming upon the brightly painted boat hull mounted on a tiny island at the Storm King Art Center, the uninitiated might quickly identify the comic-book style of Roy Lichtenstein, but its otherwise mysterious presence prompts more questions than it answers.

Mark Segal
May 11, 2017
After a 30-year hiatus as a cabinetmaker, Mark Webber, a Sag Harbor resident, returned to sculpture.

Mark Webber is partial to rectangles. For his senior exhibition at SUNY Purchase, “I did all rectangles,” he recalled during a recent visit to his woodworking shop in Wainscott. 

After graduation, in 1980, he moved to a loft in SoHo to pursue a career as a sculptor. 

Judy D’Mello
May 4, 2017
One writer's endurance trial in witnessing the full program of new play readings at Bay Street Theater

Theater only works if it is seen. It needs an audience, but an audience suggests passivity, as in filmgoing. You can watch a film any time, even one with a dead actor, and it makes no difference. You can always see Lawrence Olivier in the movie version of “Othello.” But you could never witness his monolithic performance at the Royal Court Theatre unless you had been there.

Mark Segal
April 27, 2017
Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it. Now she is capturing the melt-off of Icelandic glaciers.

Diane Tuft has always loved the landscape, and she goes to extraordinary lengths to photograph it.