Recent Stories: Lead article

Christopher Walsh
September 20, 2017
On Saturday, for the second time in three weeks, State Department of Environmental Conservation officers boarded a Montauk-based party boat and charged anglers with possessing undersize and over-the-limit black sea bass and porgies.

On Saturday, for the second time in three weeks, State Department of Environmental Conservation officers boarded a Montauk-based party boat and charged anglers with possessing undersize and over-the-limit black sea bass and porgies.

Benning DeLaMater, a D.E.C. public information officer, said in an email yesterday that the agency’s officers, along with a fisheries enforcement officer from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, had been on patrol in Montauk Harbor and inspected the Viking Starship when it returned to port. All the anglers were checked as they offloaded their catch, with 23 found to be in violation. 

Jennifer Landes
September 19, 2017
Mary Ellen Bartley, a photographer known for her formalist photographs of books, turns her lens to the library of Big and Little Edie Beale in "Reading Grey Gardens" at the Drawing Room.

The intersection of Mary Ellen Bartley, known for her long engagement with the quiet formal qualities of books, and Grey Gardens, a continual source of curiosity and prurient interest, makes no sense in any obvious way. Yet, it has resulted in an unexpected and knockout exhibition at the Drawing Room gallery in East Hampton.

Although the East Hampton property has been owned for decades by the Washington, D.C., media elites Sally Quinn and her late husband, Ben Bradlee, it is famous primarily as the former residence of Edith Ewing Bouvier Beale and Edie Bouvier Beale, the abandoned wife and daughter of Phelan Beale. The pair lived in abject conditions in what had been a well-appointed house in Georgica.

T.E. McMorrow
September 18, 2017
Brian R. Callahan, a hedge fund manager who bilked his investors of some $96 million in a Ponzi scheme involving Montauk's Panoramic Resort, was sentenced Friday at the federal courthouse in Central Islip to serve 12 years in prison, with three years' supervised release.

Brian R. Callahan, a hedge fund manager who bilked his investors of some $96 million in a Ponzi scheme involving Montauk's Panoramic Resort, was sentenced Friday at the federal courthouse in Central Islip to serve 12 years in prison, with three years' supervised release. Mr. Callahan, 47, pleaded guilty to securities fraud and wire fraud in 2014.

Judy D’Mello
September 14, 2017
East Hampton High School’s media center becomes a learning commons.

Michael Buquicchio is not called a librarian because East Hampton High School’s library is not called a library anymore. 

It is now known as the media center, and Mr. Buquicchio is the school’s media specialist. This more contemporary title is, in fact, fitting for someone only 10 years older than the current class of seniors, having graduated from East Hampton in 2007. It is even more appropriate given that Mr. Buquicchio recently spearheaded a renovation of the school’s media center, helping to modernize it and bring it up to speed — full-throttle internet speed, that is.

Christopher Walsh
September 12, 2017
Kathee Burke-Gonzalez and Jeffrey Bragman are the apparent winners in the Democratic primary for East Hampton Town Board, trailed by Zachary Cohen, who forced the primary after being passed over for the Democratic Committee’s endorsement.

Kathee Burke-Gonzalez and Jeffrey Bragman are the apparent winners in the Democratic primary for East Hampton Town Board, trailed by Zachary Cohen, who forced the primary after being passed over for the Democratic Committee’s endorsement. They will face the Republican Party’s candidates, Paul Giardina and Jerry Larsen, in the Nov. 7 election. 

In another primary race, Julie Evans, a registered Independence Party member who is running for town trustee on the Republican ticket, appears to have won one of the nine trustee spots on the Independence party ticket. Ms. Evans also successfully petitioned to force a primary after her party failed to endorse her race and will appear on the Independence Party line. 

Christopher Walsh
August 24, 2017
“Somebody has to be the figure to stand up and say this is right, this is wrong,” Howard Dean, the one-time presidential candidate and former Vermont governor, said this week in a discussion of President Donald Trump’s reaction to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., following a white supremacist rally there.

“Somebody has to be the figure to stand up and say this is right, this is wrong,” Howard Dean, the one-time presidential candidate and former Vermont governor, said this week in a discussion of President Donald Trump’s reaction to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., following a white supremacist rally there.

Echoing comments by other Democratic leaders, Mr. Dean said that the president lacked the moral compass necessary for a successful presidency and that he had led the way in a spasm of racist activity in recent weeks.

Joanne Pilgrim
August 17, 2017
Historical houses throughout East Hampton could be designated as landmarks, protecting them from demolition or substantial change, through a program being considered by the East Hampton Town Board that would also give their owners the right to build a second residence on their properties.

Historical houses throughout East Hampton could be designated as landmarks, protecting them from demolition or substantial change, through a program being considered by the East Hampton Town Board that would also give their owners the right to build a second residence on their properties.

Thirteen of the most historically significant houses have been selected as candidates for landmarks in the first phase of the program, which was outlined on Tuesday for the board by Robert Hefner, a historic preservation consultant.

The program is modeled after one adopted by East Hampton Village through which 23 houses were tagged for preservation.

Judy D’Mello
August 10, 2017
The Cedar Point Lighthouse, a beacon that stood sentinel for the busy port of Sag Harbor for some 100 years, will be restored after falling into a perilous state.

The Cedar Point Lighthouse, a beacon that stood sentinel for the busy port of Sag Harbor  for some 100 years, will be restored after falling into a perilous state.

On Monday at 11 a.m., Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming will join State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr., Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, and County Legislator Kara Hahn at the end of Sag Harbor’s Long Wharf to announce the appointment of the Lee H. Skolnick Architecture and Design Partnership to renovate the roof and exterior of the building, which stands facing Shelter Island between Gardiner’s Bay and Northwest Harbor. The County Legislature has approved $500,000 for work.

Irene Silverman
August 3, 2017
The East Hampton Town Historic Records Project, a collaboration between the town and the East Hampton Library’s Long Island Collection, has scanned and preserved a trove of rare archival materials.

“It is no crime to kill a person here with a motor,” Ruth Gordon Stratton of East Hampton wrote home in 1917 from war-torn France, where she was helping to run a Red Cross field station. “They only arrest the corpse for obstructing the traffic but to run over a dog is a terrible thing . . .”

Star Staff
July 31, 2017
Firefighters from Bridgehampton, East Hampton, Springs, Sag Harbor, and Southampton responded to a fire that triggered an automatic alarm.

The story as it appeared in print on Aug. 3: The Southampton Town Fire Marshal’s office continued to investigate the cause of a fire Monday afternoon at a Sagaponack house, though John Rankin, the marshal leading the investigation, said Tuesday that it did not appear suspicious.

The blaze, at 175 Merchant’s Path, apparently began in a basement electrical room and was thought to have been an equipment malfunction, Mr. Rankin said. He is still working to determine the exact cause.

Bridgehampton Fire Department Chief Jeff White discovered smoke pouring out from the base of shingles on the side of the 3,000-square-foot house when he answered an automatic gas-detector alarm that went off at 1:50 p.m. No one was home at the time.

T.E. McMorrow
July 28, 2017
Jefferson Davis Eames, 49, was handcuffed on Thursday and taken to a holding cell in East Hampton Town Justice Court, his first stop before beginning to serve the eight-month sentence Justice Lisa R. Rana had just handed down.

Jefferson Davis Eames, 49, was handcuffed on Thursday and taken to a holding cell in East Hampton Town Justice Court, his first stop before beginning to serve the eight-month sentence Justice Lisa R. Rana had just handed down.

Toward the end of last year, Mr. Eames's house in Springs was the scene of parties where underage drinking and drug consumption took place. He pleaded guilty in May to endangering the welfare of a child and hosting a party at which minors were consuming alcohol, as well as driving with ability impaired by drugs and unlawfully fleeing a police officer. The various charges stemmed from five different incidents.

Carissa Katz
July 27, 2017
In Jeff Mayer’s version of “Field of Dreams” it wasn’t “if you build it, they will come,” but rather they came and so he built it — the “it” in this case being a BMX pump track at the Hayground School in Bridgehampton.

In Jeff Mayer’s version of “Field of Dreams” it wasn’t “if you build it, they will come,” but rather they came and so he built it — the “it” in this case being a BMX pump track at the Hayground School in Bridgehampton.

Rewind three years. Mayer, a former BMX pro, D.J., and designer, was spending his first summer at the Hayground Camp with his wife, Angela De Vincenzo, a learning specialist, and their son, Luca. The couple were running their Blocks, Trucks + Art programs from the trailer of an 18-wheeler they call Big Mama.

The truck and the Mayer-De Vincenzo team were an instant hit.

Christopher Walsh
July 24, 2017
Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming, a former member of the Southampton Town Board, announced on Friday her intention to seek re-election to the Legislature for a second two-year term.

Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming, a former member of the Southampton Town Board, announced on Friday her intention to seek re-election to the Legislature for a second two-year term.

In a release on Friday Ms. Fleming, a Democrat, referred to her advocacy for East End interests including clean water, preservation of natural resources, battling tick-borne diseases and opioid use, and promoting economic development.

Joanne Pilgrim
July 20, 2017
East Hampton’s new port security vessel, a 42-foot boat that will be stationed in Montauk to fight fires and assist the Coast Guard with its duties under the Department of Homeland Security, will be christened in a ceremony on Wednesday.

East Hampton’s new port security vessel, a 42-foot boat that will be stationed in Montauk to fight fires and assist the Coast Guard with its duties under the Department of Homeland Security, will be christened in a ceremony on Wednesday. It will be named for John L. Behan of Montauk.

The $600,000 boat, which was delivered in early June and can travel at a speed of 30 knots, was purchased in part with a $450,000 grant from the federal homeland security agency; the town contributed $150,000, or 25 percent of the cost.

Judy D’Mello
July 20, 2017
Community chips in to give foster children memorable week with their siblings.

What happens when six children from New York City’s foster care system arrive in the Hamptons in mid-July for 10 days? A community shows such generosity, it combats the usual stereotypes associated with the summer landscape of mega money, moguls, and mansions.

The children came, as they do each year, to attend Camp Erutan (nature backward), founded by Lisa Tanzman, a California native, as a way for inner city foster children to spend time in the outdoors participating in activities to help heal and mend. Ms. Tanzman’s mantra is that one positive action can make a difference in a life, and her goal, whenever possible, is to reunite siblings often separated by the foster care system.

Christopher Walsh
July 17, 2017
Four weeks after they ordered Georgica Pond closed to the harvesting of crabs and other marine life due to a report a toxic blue-green algae from Suffolk officials, the East Hampton Town Trustees reopened the pond as the algal bloom had significantly diminished.

Four weeks after they ordered Georgica Pond closed to the harvesting of crabs and other marine life due to a report a toxic blue-green algae from Suffolk officials, the East Hampton Town Trustees reopened the pond as the algal bloom had significantly diminished.

"The bacteria levels have been down for about two weeks now," Bill Taylor, a deputy clerk of the trustees, said last week of the bloom of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae. Mr. Taylor removed the signs that had been posted to notify the public that crabbing was prohibited around July 7, he said.

T.E. McMorrow
July 15, 2017
Police are seeking information about early-morning shotgun blasts that damaged a house on Oakview Highway in East Hampton Saturday.

Update, July 20: The early-morning quiet on Oakview Highway in East Hampton was shattered Saturday by several blasts from a shotgun. According to East Hampton Town police, the blasts damaged a house at 142 Oakview Highway. The owner of record is Sharon A. Bacon.

Police found spent shotgun shells in the street. There were no injuries.

The gunshots were heard at about 3:45 a.m. and a 911 call was placed.

Police interviewed the occupants of the house, including one individual who they believe may have been the focus of the shooter, but he has not been cooperative, according to police. An investigation is continuing, and police have asked that anyone with information call 631-537-7575. All calls will be kept confidential.

Mark Segal
July 13, 2017
"Native American Life on the East End," an exhibition at the Eastville Community Historical Society, offers a glimpse of the African-Americans, Native Americans, and European immigrants who lived together in Sag Harbor.

"Native American Life on the East End," an exhibition of than 60 artifacts, including tintypes, cabinet cards, vintage and contemporary photographs, and original artwork, which opened on Saturday at the Eastville Community Historical Society, 139 Hampton Street, Sag Harbor, is a testament to Native Americans on the eastern part of Paumanok, the Native American name for Long Island, from the Paleo-Indian period, which lasted from approximately 15,000 to 7,000 B.C., to the present time. It will remain on view through Oct. 7.

Joanne Pilgrim
July 6, 2017
Keep a watch on your oak trees this summer. By season’s end, it will likely be obvious if any have been struck by oak wilt disease, a fungus that is readily spread and easily kills the trees.

Keep a watch on your oak trees this summer. By season’s end, it will likely be obvious if any have been struck by oak wilt disease, a fungus that is readily spread and easily kills the trees.

Infected oaks must be taken out and the wood properly disposed of. Pruning can spread the disease by exposing oak-wilt spore, which attracts beetles that carry it to other trees, so it should be left until the fall.

Jack Graves
July 4, 2017
As of earlier this week, all three East Hampton Little League boys teams were contending for District 36 Final Fours.

As of earlier this week, all three East Hampton Little League boys teams were contending for District 36 Final Fours. 

The 11-12 Maroon team coached by Chris Anderson finished pool play at 4-1 at the Pantigo fields Saturday by trouncing Southampton 10-0, thanks in great measure to Jack Dickinson’s no-hit pitching. That wasn’t the only no-hitter for the Maroons last week: Hunter Eberhart and and Aryan Chugh combined for one versus Eastport-South Manor on June 27. The young Bonackers won that game 12-0.

The 11-12 Grey team coached by Andrew Daige likewise did very well last week, rebounding from a lopsided playoff-opener loss to East End with three straight wins, over North Fork, Patchogue, and Mattituck, which had previously been undefeated.

Judy D’Mello
June 29, 2017
Three students who graduated from high school in East Hampton, Sag Harbor, and Bridgehampton this month are a study in getting ahead despite the odds.

Three students who graduated from high school in East Hampton, Sag Harbor, and Bridgehampton this month are a study in getting ahead despite the odds.

For Francesca Denaro, who graduated from East Hampton High School on Friday, the difficulty was that she was on her own, with only her older brother for support. Santiago Salvidar is the first member of his family to go to college, and perhaps high school. He explained that his father, hobbled by alcoholism, was dependent on his wages. The third student, Cristina Guadalupe Espinoza Paucar, arrived from Ecuador to join her father in Bridgehampton, enrolling in the 10th grade there although she spoke no English.

Jackie Pape
June 28, 2017
From fishing to ferries, and now cruises, one longtime Montauk business seems to have a boat for all reasons.

From fishing to ferries, and now cruises, one longtime Montauk business seems to have a boat for all reasons. 

For the first time, this summer the Viking Fleet, which has been in Montauk since 1936, will offer four cruises for all ages every day, and unlike the other outings the fleet is known for, these will not be about fishing. 

“We wanted to try something altogether different,” Capt. Paul Forsberg, the fleet’s owner, said this week. “This is something that isn’t available in the town, and there’s a market for this.” 

Judy D’Mello
June 22, 2017
Negotiations between the district and the East Hampton Town Board have been going on for several months, and the school’s failure to strike a deal and move away from Cedar Street has elicited mounting frustration.

“There is a tenor in this country at the moment where it has become acceptable to speak in a disrespectful way to anyone,” said Jacqueline Lowey, a member of the East Hampton School Board, at its meeting Tuesday evening, following an angry outburst by Paul D’Andrea, who took to the podium to lob some bombshells at J.P. Foster, the board’s president.

The issue once again was the proposed Cedar Street school bus depot. Concerned neighbors have formed the Cedar Street Committee, to which Mr. D’Andrea belongs, to oppose it, urging that the school district instead purchase a town-owned plot of land along the largely industrial stretch of Springs-Fireplace Road for its transportation hub.

Jackie Pape
June 20, 2017
Three were vying for two seats in Tuesday night's election, and just five votes separated the winner of the second seat from the third place finisher.

Three were vying for two Sag Harbor Village Board seats in Tuesday night's election, and just five votes separated the winner of the second seat from the third place finisher. 

Ken O’Donnell, the only incumbent running, was also the highest vote-getter, with 238 cast for him. His running mate, Thomas Gardella, the former Sag Harbor Fire Department chief, received 197 votes. That was not enough to win a seat on the board. That went to H. Aidan Corish, a political newcomer, who received 202 votes.

There were three write-in votes, one each for Jeff Peters, Thomas Schiavoni, and Chris Hubbard.