Recent Stories: Villages

Carissa Katz
April 19, 2018
Earth Day efforts across the East End this weekend offer a chance to clean beaches, trails, and roadsides, recycle electronic waste, celebrate the planet through art and song, and consider lasting actions to protect it.

There is no shortage of troubling news about the state of our environment as Earth Day approaches. 

A few examples: Global greenhouse gas emissions increased last year, while here in the United States, the Trump administration continued its efforts to roll back emissions standards. A study published last month in the journal Scientific Reports revealed that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — a massive floating island of debris composed mostly of plastics — is 4 to 16 times larger than previously thought. And in Spain, the necropsy of a 33-foot sperm whale found dead off the coast in February revealed it had more than 60 pounds of trash clogging its digestive system. 

Christopher Walsh
April 19, 2018
Four months after Ronald Perelman’s sprawling application to legalize numerous zoning-code violations was considered, the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday granted most of the billionaire investor and philanthropist’s variance requests for the Creeks, his estate on Georgica Pond.

Four months after Ronald Perelman’s sprawling application to legalize numerous zoning-code violations was considered, the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday granted most of the billionaire investor and philanthropist’s variance requests for the Creeks, his estate on Georgica Pond. 

Several buildings had been constructed or expanded on the nearly 58-acre property without building permits and in violation of required setbacks from wetland areas. The setbacks were of  concern because of the property’s proximity to the pond, which is ecologically compromised.

Jamie Bufalino
April 19, 2018
The Deacon David Hedges house in Sagaponack, a farmhouse built in 1775 by a descendant of one of the founding families of East Hampton, was listed for sale last Wednesday for an asking price of $11.95 million.

The Deacon David Hedges house in Sagaponack, a farmhouse built in 1775 by a descendant of one of the founding families of East Hampton, was listed for sale last Wednesday for an asking price of $11.95 million.

Deacon David Hedges, who lived from 1744 to 1817, was a prominent preacher and statesman. He served for 20 years as supervisor of Southampton Town, was a member of New York’s Fourth Provincial Congress, which adopted the first State Constitution, and was a delegate to the convention that ratified the Constitution of the United States. The house he built is located on Hedges Lane, a street that was named for the family and which, at one point, consisted only of houses owned by Hedges relatives. 

Christopher Walsh
April 19, 2018
In honor of Earth Day, which is Sunday, the musician Dan Zanes, a onetime rock ’n’ roller who is now the most recognized name in the family-music genre, will give a free concert at 3 p.m. at the East Hampton Presbyterian Church.

In honor of Earth Day, which is Sunday, the musician Dan Zanes, a onetime rock ’n’ roller who is now the most recognized name in the family-music genre, will give a free concert at 3 p.m. at the East Hampton Presbyterian Church. 

Fans of a certain age may remember Mr. Zanes from the Del Fuegos, a Boston-based rock band that found mainstream success with the 1985 album “Boston, Mass.,” featuring the hits “Don’t Run Wild” and “I Still Want You.” After the band’s dissolution, Mr. Zanes became a father and began creating music that he and his daughter could enjoy together. 

Christopher Walsh
April 19, 2018
A 39.2-acre portion of the more than 200-acre Maidstone Club property, which stretches along Dunemere and Old Beach Lanes, was the focus of the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday when it reviewed an application for a 676-square-foot “warming hut” where its platform tennis courts and main clubhouse are located.

A 39.2-acre portion of the more than 200-acre Maidstone Club property, which stretches along Dunemere and Old Beach Lanes, was the focus of the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday when it reviewed an application for a 676-square-foot “warming hut” where its platform tennis courts and main clubhouse are located.

The hut would require a 958-square-foot village variance to allow 277,301 square feet of coverage on the 39.2-acre site as well as special permit and coastal erosion hazard area permits. The club also seeks to legalize two storage sheds, one of which is seaward of the coastal erosion hazard line. 

Judy D’Mello
April 11, 2018
Eakta Gandhi's work as a coveted henna artist across the East End keeps her rooted to her Indian heritage and fulfills a childhood dream.

The ancient Indian tradition of mehndi, or henna body art, goes back at least 2,000 years, when it was detailed in the Kama Sutra as one of the necessary arts a woman needed to learn in order to please and seduce. 

But over the last 100 years, it has served a particular purpose at wedding rituals, when a bridegroom would hold a bride’s hand and search for his name hidden within the wavelike, wine-colored lines and floral trellises that covered her extremities. It was a perfect icebreaker, particularly in traditional Indian marriages in which the newlyweds were meeting for the first time.

Star Staff
April 11, 2018

David E. Rattray

631-324-7827

Farm Museum Opens

The festivities will start at 10 a.m. Saturday when the East Hampton Historical Farm Museum opens for the season. A sale of antique farm tools and furnishings will take place until noon, and there will be tours of the house, barn, and collection of wagons and buggies until 4 p.m. 

A team of workhorses and their handlers, who will talk about how animals powered farm machines in the days before engines, will be on hand. Country music, dancing, and refreshments are planned. A $5 contribution for the museum will be suggested.

Jamie Bufalino
April 11, 2018
As East Hampton Village continued to refine the language of a proposed law governing special events, proponents and critics of the measure voiced their concerns at a trustee meeting last Thursday.

As East Hampton Village continued to refine the language of a proposed law governing special events, proponents and critics of the measure voiced their concerns at a trustee meeting last Thursday, and Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. announced that, after nearly two months of debate, the public hearing phase of the discussion would be coming to an end as of 4 p.m. yesterday.

Star Staff
April 11, 2018
Sag Harbor News

631-324-7827

Katy’s Courage Nears

The eighth annual Katy’s Courage 5K will take place on April 21 at 8:30 a.m. Advance registration for $25 is at katyscourage.org. On race day the fee is $30, and registration and check-in will happen between 7 and 8:15 a.m. at 21 West Water Street. The run benefits scholarships for East End students, pediatric cancer research, and Katy’s Kids @ CMEE, a center for grieving children.

On Saturday, Vineyard Vines on Job’s Lane in Southampton will benefit Katy’s Courage by offering shoppers 10 percent off their purchases between 1 and 4 p.m., and the store will donate 10 percent to Katy’s Courage.


John Jermain Programs

Star Staff
April 11, 2018

Amagansett

Christopher Walsh

631-324-0002

The East Hampton Trails Preservation Society will have a two-hour walk through the rolling woodlands of Amagansett on Saturday at 10 a.m. Participants will hike some clearly blazed trails, and others that are less so. Hikers have been asked to meet on Red Dirt Road about one-quarter mile east of Accabonac Road. Jim Zajac, the hike’s leader, can be called at 212-769-4311 for more information. 


Meet the Moor

Jamie Bufalino
April 4, 2018
In the end, love — and some shrewd legal maneuvering — conquered all, as the wedding for Kevin O’Brien and Tara McCauley took place at the Hedges Inn on Saturday, overcoming a bitter permitting dispute.

In the end, love — and some shrewd legal maneuvering — conquered all, as the wedding for Kevin O’Brien and Tara McCauley took place at the Hedges Inn on Saturday, overcoming a bitter permitting dispute between East Hampton Village and the inn.

Just 16 days earlier, the village, citing code and zoning restrictions, had denied a permit for the wedding, which was to be held in a tent on the Hedges property. That denial brought the groom’s mother, Joanne Lester O’Brien, who is an East Hampton resident and a member of the Fire Department, to the March 16 village board meeting, where she tearfully pleaded to keep the nuptials on track. 

David E. Rattray
April 4, 2018
Trees and how to care for them will be the subject of a panel discussion on Monday at 3 p.m. in St. Luke’s Episcopal Church’s Hoie Hall organized by the Ladies Village Improvement Society. Experts will take questions about all things trees. The panelists will be Deborah Green from Bartlett Tree Experts, Mike Gaines from CW Arborists, Charlie Marder from Marders, and Mariah Whitmore from Whitmore’s.

631-324-7827

Trees and how to care for them will be the subject of a panel discussion on Monday at 3 p.m. in St. Luke’s Episcopal Church’s Hoie Hall organized by the Ladies Village Improvement Society. Experts will take questions about all things trees. The panelists will be Deborah Green from Bartlett Tree Experts, Mike Gaines from CW Arborists, Charlie Marder from Marders, and Mariah Whitmore from Whitmore’s. 

The program will be moderated by Olivia Brooks, the L.V.I.S. tree committee chairwoman. Interested members of the public have been invited; R.S.V.P.s can be sent to info2@lvis.org.

 

Jane Bimson
April 4, 2018
Local Montauk Notes

631-324-7827

For the Scheffer Boys

A fund-raiser at the Harvest restaurant on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. will benefit Coen and Benjamin Scheffer, the young sons of Deborah Lee Scheffer, who died in February from complications of childbirth. Hosted by the Montauk Historical Society, the event will include hors d’oeuvres, a buffet, and a cash bar, plus raffle prizes. Tickets cost $25 and are available at Becker’s Hardware, the Montauk Lighthouse gift shop, and at the door.  

 

Star Staff
April 4, 2018
With the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War coming later this year, the John Jermain Memorial Library will present “Legacies of World War I” on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. The program will examine America’s role in the war and its aftermath.

The Great War’s Legacy

With the 100th anniversary of the end of the Great War coming later this year, the John Jermain Memorial Library will present “Legacies of World War I” on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. The program will examine America’s role in the war and its aftermath, and the conflict’s subsequent effect on geopolitical boundaries and the nature of war itself. Registration is required.

Star Staff
April 4, 2018
News of our local villages

Amagansett

Christopher Walsh

631-324-0002

The East Hampton Trails Preservation Society’s five-mile hike on Sunday at 10 a.m. will be at a fast pace and offer unspoiled views of Fresh Pond and Napeague Bay. Hikers have been asked to meet on Napeague Harbor Road about a half-mile north of Montauk Highway, just after the street marked “Private Road.” Irwin Levy can be contacted for more information at 516-456-1337 or irwintlevy@gmail.com. 


From Sci-Fi to the Bard

Jamie Bufalino
March 29, 2018
Renovations began last week at the Long Island Rail Road station in East Hampton Village, marking the start of a months-long project that will keep the building closed well into the summer season, even as train service remains uninterrupted.

Renovations began last week at the Long Island Rail Road station in East Hampton Village, marking the start of a months-long project that will keep the building closed well into the summer season, even as train service remains uninterrupted. 

“Work on the station house will be wrapping up in midsummer 2018 and work on the platforms and surrounding areas will continue through March of 2019,” said Aaron Donovan, a spokes­man for the Metropolitan Transit Authority, which operates the L.I.R.R. The station has been encircled by chain-link fencing and flanked by trailers, one of which is functioning as a makeshift waiting room that is open daily from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Jamie Bufalino
March 29, 2018
The Sag Harbor Cinema Arts Center was one step closer to reality this week after the Sag Harbor Village Planning Board approved its building plans on Tuesday evening. The Sag Harbor Board of Historic Preservation and Architectural Review will render its decision, the center’s final hurdle, after a public hearing on April 12.

The Sag Harbor Cinema Arts Center was one step closer to reality this week after the Sag Harbor Village Planning Board approved its building plans on Tuesday evening. The Sag Harbor Board of Historic Preservation and Architectural Review will render its decision, the center’s final hurdle, after a public hearing on April 12. 

The design calls for a three-story structure with two theaters, a screening room, and a rooftop deck. The facade will be rebuilt to match exactly the original movie house, which was destroyed by fire in December of 2016. 

Star Staff
March 29, 2018

Lauren M. Hersh and Kevin M. Starke were married on Saturday at Firefighters Park in Great Neck. The Hon. Neil R. Finkston, a justice in the Village of Great Neck, officiated, and a reception followed at Wild Ginger Asian Fusion restaurant, also in Great Neck. 

The bride is the daughter of Brenda Hersh of New York City and East Hampton and Robert M. Hersh of Roslyn Heights. The groom’s parents are Sandra J. Starke and Roy H. Starke of Great Neck.

The bride earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Clark University in Massachusetts. She is an adjunct lecturer in English at Queensborough Community College, an adjunct assistant professor at Nassau Community College, and a tutor in the writing center there. 

Jamie Bufalino
March 22, 2018
On Friday, just two weeks and a day before her son’s wedding reception at the Hedges Inn in East Hampton, Joanne Lester O’Brien learned that East Hampton Village had denied a permit for the March 31 event.

On Friday, just two weeks and a day before her son’s wedding reception at the Hedges Inn in East Hampton, Joanne Lester O’Brien learned that East Hampton Village had denied a permit for the March 31 event and five others planned at the inn this year. 

“When my son got engaged last summer, it made all the sense in the world for us to have this wedding with our friends instead of at an UpIsland wedding factory,” she told the village board on Friday. Her son had signed a contract with the inn months ago. She found out that the plans were in jeopardy just an hour before Friday’s village board meeting.  

T.E. McMorrow
March 22, 2018
For Kathy Keller, this year’s grand marshal of the Montauk Friends of Erin St. Patrick’s Day parade, leading the parade on Sunday is part of a family tradition.

For Kathy Keller, this year’s grand marshal of the Montauk Friends of Erin St. Patrick’s Day parade, leading the parade on Sunday is part of a family tradition. The seeds for the annual event were planted by her grandfather, Eddie Pugh, and three of his friends on St. Patrick’s Day in 1947, when, while leading a white horse, they marched from Second House to the Trail’s End restaurant. Where they got the white horse is lost in the mists of time. According to Ms. Keller, the four men and the horse took a brief detour to the Montauk Tavern on Main Street, now known as the Shagwong.

Bess Rattray
March 22, 2018
Approximately 80 groups are expected to participate, including marching bands, whimsical and sometimes zany floats, many bagpipers in kilts, and fire departments from across Long Island.

Where and When:
The 56th annual Montauk Friends of Erin parade starts on Edgemere Road at noon on Sunday and winds south along Edgemere, turning west on Main Street to pass before the grand stand — under the eye of Rick White, the master of ceremonies, and gathered worthies and float judges — before ending at the Montauk I.G.A. about two hours later. Approximately 80 groups are expected to participate, including marching bands, whimsical and sometimes zany floats, many bagpipers in kilts, and fire departments from across Long Island. For many children, a highlight is grabbing the candy and bead necklaces handed out by many of groups as they march.

Warming Up:

Hilary Thayer Hamann
March 22, 2018
The Suffolk County Department of Health Services will offer private well testing to residents of Noyac next week as a result of preliminary findings from water tests conducted by the agency that show abnormally high levels of contaminants such as manganese, cobalt, and arsenic in the aquifer beneath the Sand Land mine on the Noyac-Bridgehampton border.

The Suffolk County Department of Health Services will offer private well testing to residents of Noyac next week as a result of preliminary findings from water tests conducted by the agency that show abnormally high levels of contaminants such as manganese, cobalt, and arsenic in the aquifer beneath the Sand Land mine on the Noyac-Bridgehampton border.

In a letter addressed to the Noyac Civic Council president, Elena Loreto, James Tomarken, commissioner of the Health Department, said, “Our staff is in the process of initiating field work this week. As was the case with the past surveys conducted for this site, there will be no cost to the homeowner. Rest assured that the department will take every step to ensure that the evaluation is thorough and accurate.”

Jamie Bufalino
March 22, 2018
A proposal to increase the permit fee for scaffolding and other sidewalk encumbrances and instituting a new fee for Dumpsters, construction vehicles, and other obstructions has triggered an outcry from business owners.

A proposal to increase the permit fee for scaffolding and other sidewalk encumbrances and instituting a new fee for Dumpsters, construction vehicles, and any other obstructions in parking spaces triggered an outcry from business owners at the Sag Harbor Village Board meeting on March 14. 

Jamie Bufalino
March 15, 2018
After spending decades looking after the beautification of East Hampton Village at large, the Ladies Village Improvement Society focused on a project even closer to home this winter, refurbishing its headquarters and thrift shops at 95 Main Street.

After spending decades looking after the beautification of East Hampton Village at large, the Ladies Village Improvement Society focused on a project even closer to home this winter, refurbishing its headquarters and thrift shops at 95 Main Street. 

The structure, which was built in 1740, had not been renovated since 1987, when the L.V.I.S. first purchased it, and years of wear and tear had left the building in a state that was often not in compliance with the village’s building codes. 

In the fall, the L.V.I.S. hired Lee H. Skolnick and Paul Alter, from the Lee H. Skolnick Architecture and Design firm, to reimagine the space, with one of the major goals being to make the thrift shops more user-friendly.