The Art Scene: 02.16.12

Nicolas Carone’s 1950s abstractions are on view at the Washburn Gallery in New York City through March 31.

Booth Dreams of Summer
    The Tulla Booth Gallery is “Dreaming of Summer” this week, with photography featuring seascapes and images of the summer lifestyle by Anne Gabriele, Daniel Jones, John Margarites, Blair Seagram, and Bob Tabor. A reception will be held on Saturday from 6 to 8 p.m.
    Ms. Gabriele’s focus is on a foggy sea. She uses image transfers to achieve a luminous quality. Mr. Jones takes large-format black-and-white images that are richly detailed for digital work. Mr. Margarites likes taking close-up water views that celebrate summer beaches in vivid detail. Ms. Seagram’s “Surf Report” captures in large panoramic views the swells that come with storms. Mr. Tabor, known for his horse photography, also seeks out dramatic ocean views in all kinds of weather.
    The show will be on view in Sag Harbor through March 30.

Love Junkies at Vered
    The Vered Gallery in East Hampton is showing “Love Junkies” through March 19. The work is by Adam Hand­ler and features paintings and photographs that examine abstract ideas of relationships and sexuality. Flags, text, and splatters figure prominently, and the pieces often show suggestive poses and have intriguing language.
    Spending time in his youth at his grandmother’s framing business exposed him to work by modern masters such as Pablo Picasso and Jasper Johns and instilled in him the passion to pursue art. He studied life drawing in Italy and went on to graduate from the State University at Purchase with a degree in art history and a minor in fine arts, which included painting, sculpture, photography, and graphic design. He has shown his work in New York City, Greenwich, Conn., Texas, and Canada.

Carone in the City
    The Washburn Gallery in New York City is showing the 1950s paintings of Nicolas Carone through March 31. Carone, who died in 2010, was one of the last survivors from the first generation of Abstract Expressionists. From 1953 to 1961, he lived on Three Mile Harbor, one of the artists who followed Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock out to the South Fork. The house he bought was rented to Willem de Kooning during 1961 and 1962 while de Kooning’s studio was being completed.
    The paintings on view are all from the time he lived in Springs and have the kind of color palette — blues, phosphorescent pinks, and golden browns — that often shows up in South Fork-inspired canvases.
    After 1962 he simply dropped out of the art world, according to Joan Washburn. “He just didn’t want to get involved in the gallery world anymore,” and didn’t have any major shows until recently, when his works from the 1950s as well as more recent compositions have been shown. He received the Lee Krasner Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.
Diversity on View
    On Saturday and Sunday at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, a group show of six artists, “Diversity,” will be on view. A reception with wines from Domaine Franey takes place on Saturday evening from 5 to 8.
    John Todaro will display photos of East Hampton and other places. Cynthia Loewen, a realist painter, will show interpretations of Mr. Todaro’s work and other acrylics and watercolors. Mary Milne, a glass artist, has multilayered fusion glass pieces. Phyllis Chillingworth will exhibit bold watercolors of Montauk, while Deborah Anderson will offer framed botanicals. Anahi DeCanio, a new artist to the area, will show abstract multimedia paintings.

“Ned Smyth: Reverence”
    Salomon Contemporary in West Chelsea will present an exhibit titled “Ned Smyth: Reverence” as part of the gallery’s series American Responses. The second of four solo shows and a musical performance, it examines the significance of American regionalism in the art of the early 1970s.
    The exhibit will include two concrete works, “Renaissance Plan” from 1973 and “Piazza Plan” from 1974. It will open this evening at 6 and run through March 17.
    Mr. Smyth is the son of Craig Hugh Smyth, who was a prominent Renaissance art historian and director of New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. He grew up in a world of academic luminaries and major museums and churches where his father did his research in Europe. These buildings became enmeshed in his experience of art, and in his first works he made architectural spaces with historical references while still instilling the minimalist aesthetic of his postmodern tendencies at the time.
    Other artists in the series are Kim MacConnel, Dickie Landry, and Tina Girouard.