The Art Scene: 02.23.12

Roy Nicholson’s 52 Weeks II, a series of small paintings done over a year between summer solstices, is on view at the Four Seasons Terrace Room.

Photo Show at Ashawagh
    Hampton Photo, Arts and Framing will present a photo exhibit at Ashawagh Hall this weekend, beginning on Saturday with a reception from 5:30 to 11 p.m. The show will feature more than 50 South Fork photographers.
    The images have been chosen and organized by Laurie Barone-Schaefer, a photographer. Among those included are Kate Petrone, Ellen Watson, Evelyn O’Doherty, Kristina Gale, Diana Frank, L. Marie Jones, Hailey Kohlus, Dan Ritzler, Lacy Jane, and many more. The show will close on Sunday at 4 p.m.

Twelve Months at Four Seasons
    Roy Nicholson’s “52 Weeks II” series of paintings is on view at the Four Seasons restaurant in Manhattan through 2012.
    Each of the 52 small panels represents a week over the course of a year, beginning with the summer solstice of 2008 and ending with the summer of 2009.  Each painting is inspired by the artist’s garden in Sag Harbor, as it changes week by week. It is the second such series Mr. Nicholson has done. The paintings may be abstract evocations or more literal representations of flowers such as columbines or elements of the landscape such as pitch-pine trees.
    John Woodward, the director of the Woodward Gallery, who was once a Four Seasons chef, has organized the installation. The restaurant has a long history of presenting works by artists, including  Joan Miró, Frank Stella, James Rosenquist, and Robert Indiana.

Isham in Southampton
    Sheila Isham’s “The Beast in Art,” paintings and works on paper depicting animals, will be shown at the Southampton Cultural Center from next Thursday through March 28.
    The artist, whose studio is in South­ampton, strives to portray the spiritual connection between humans and animals. Her modern influences, she has said, are Kandinsky, Chagall, and Franz Marc. She explores both the abstract and the figurative in her work, with references to the art of ancient Egypt, China, and the prehistoric cave paintings at Lascaux, France.
    Ms. Isham, who has had many museum and gallery exhibits in the course of her career, won the best in show award at the cultural center’s first juried exhibit in October. A reception will be held on March 3 from 4 to 7 p.m.

Guggenheim To
Present Chamberlain

    Beginning tomorrow, the Guggenheim  Museum will present “John Cham­berlain: Choices,” a retrospective of the artist’s 60-year career. It is the first retrospective in the United States since 1986 and the first at the Guggenheim since 1971. Chamberlain, who had a house on Shelter Island, died in December.
    On display will be selections from the early iron sculptures, work in foam, Plexiglas, and paper, and his final large-scale foil pieces, which will be seen publicly for the first time in this country. The exhibit will reflect the artist’s shifts in scale, materials, and techniques.
    It will be on view through May 13. A review will appear in an upcoming issue. A number of programs, including a March 13 discussion of his work with Susan Davidson, the curator, Dave Hickey, and Donna De Salvo, are scheduled and can be found online at guggenheim.org/publicprograms.

Sherman Retrospective
At MoMA

    Cindy Sherman’s work from the 1970s to the present will be shown at the Museum of Modern Art beginning on Sunday through June 11.
    More than 180 photographs will be on view, covering a variety of the artist’s bodies of work of constructed characters and tableaus. This is the first comprehensive survey of her career in the United States since 1997 and will draw widely from public and private collections, including MoMA’s own collection. The museum owns the entire “Untitled Film Stills” series.
    The exhibit has been organized by Eva Respini, an associate curator in the department of photography, with Lucy Gallun assisting. The exhibit will explore such themes as artifice and fiction, cinema and performance, horror and the grotesque, myth, carnival, and fairy tale, as well as gender and class identity. It will also include photographic murals from 2010.