A Noisy Noise . . .

We can’t help but wonder if the pervasive din will begin to have a downward effect on real estate

   Where some people hear noise, other people hear cash registers ringing, but as complaints pile up about excessive sounds this summer — especially in beleaguered Montauk — we can’t help but wonder if the pervasive din will begin to have a downward effect on real estate. In keeping with the theme of a community overrun and getting out of control, which we have heard in casual conversations just about everywhere in recent weeks, the general volume seems turned up to 11 (to give a tip of the cap to “This is Spinal Tap.”)
    Two areas of town come to mind when you consider decibels: approaches to East Hampton Airport and the area around Fort Pond in Montauk, along with its downtown, where audible amplified music is the norm on weekend evenings. And, almost wherever you are, leaf blowers, crack-of-dawn construction crews, and boisterous share-house parties are to be reckoned with.
    If anything, East Hampton Town Hall seemed ready to make things worse recently, putting forward rule changes that would have made it impractical, if not impossible, for police and the Ordinance Enforcement Department to keep a lid on things.
    In the spring, we spilled a lot of ink cataloging things that this fall’s political candidates should be talking and thinking about in the run-up to the November election. It’s time to add noise to the list, and ask what they propose to do about it.