Slow Food Gets Slow Pics

The produce in the book — heirloom vegetables, fruits, herbs, and nuts, as well as flowers — was grown on Ms. Goldman’s 200-acre farm in the Hudson Valley
Daguerrotypes of heirloom varieties of produce, such as potatoes and melons, are featured in a new book.

Amy Goldman will present and sign copies of her “Heirloom Harvest” book of daguerrotypes at Marders in Bridgehampton on Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. Artisanal pizza made with organic vegetables and ingredients will be served.

The produce in the book — heirloom vegetables, fruits, herbs, and nuts, as well as flowers — was grown on Ms. Goldman’s 200-acre farm in the Hudson Valley. In an essay, she discusses the process of growing heirlooms with modern techniques.

Jerry Spagnoli, a well-known photographer working in the historical medium, has collaborated with Ms. Goldman on the project for 15 years. Daguerrotypes, one of the earliest photographic processes, involve exposing treated silver-plated copper in a camera until an image develops that is then encased under glass. Mr. Spagnoli has published several books featuring the process and has worked with Chuck Close on his daguerrotype projects. His work is in the collections of the National Portrait Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago, among other museums.

Ms. Goldman is the author of “The Heirloom Tomato,” “The Compleat Squash,” and “Melons for the Passionate.” She is an active board member and special advisor to the nonprofit Seed Savers Exchange.