Edvin Stromsten

Edvin Stromsten

    Edvin Karl Stromsten, an architect, urban planner, professor of architecture, and part-time resident of Copeces Lane in Springs, died at Southampton Hospital on Aug. 27 after a massive heart attack. He was 80.
    Mr. Stromsten earned a certificate of architecture from Cooper Union in New York City, a bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Berkeley, and a master’s degree in urban design and planning from City College.
    He became a teaching fellow at the University of California and a professor of architecture at Cooper Union, the New York Institute of Technology, and  City College. He also lectured at the New School in New York.
    He was born on Oct. 4, 1930, to Norwegian immigrant parents. He was raised in Port Jefferson and lived much of his life in New York City and Springs. Mr. Stromsten was an Army veteran of the Korean War.
    As a practicing architect, he worked in California, London, and New York City in partnership with other architects and under his own flag. He won awards for large-scale urban renewal projects in Europe and in this country. He designed schools, institutional and religious buildings, university buildings, parks, mass-transit stations, and commercial and residential properties.
    The most celebrated and publicized recent work by Mr. Stromsten was a house on Copeces Lane, one of the East End’s first attempts at a “net zero” building. The structure is earth-sheltered with radiant heating and cooling and photovoltaic panels that provide most of the energy required by way of a small heat pump. The building was launched as a “green trial” by John Mayo, a volunteer resident who sought to reduce his carbon footprint.
    Mr. Stromsten represented the Peconic chapter of the American Institute of Architects. He was part of the Southampton Town task force that redesigned the flow of County Road 39 and helped that town’s efforts to rework its standards for waste treatment.
    Close to his heart was a project to establish a regional sustainable-design institute that would serve as a resource for all East End municipal planning boards and conservation groups.
    Mr. Stromsten served as chairman of the planning and government standing committee of the Peconic chapter of A.I.A. from 2006 to 2010. The chapter encouraged green planning, sustainable community development, and the establishment of a public transportation system for the East End. He also reviewed projects with the chapter’s design awards committee.
    Mr. Stromsten is survived by Gabriele Roos, his partner for 23 years. He also leaves a brother, Martin Stromsten of Riverhead. A memorial gathering of friends is planned for Oct. 1 at 61 Copeces Lane.
 

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Mr. Stromsten is also survived by his daughter Anne Glass and her husband Bill, daughter Jennifer Stromsten and her husband David Brock and son Sean Stromsten and his wife Amy Hoff. In addition he had a step-daughter Jeanne Fletcher and her husband Brian, a step-son Rick Bianco and his wife Pam and another step-son Greg Bianco and his wife Laura. Mr. Stromsten is also survived by grandchildren Alice, Patrick, Brendan, Vivian, Charlie, Lucy, Theo, Jennifer and Christopher.
Nice obit. Too bad the heirs were omitted
Edvin Stromsten is also survived by Sheila Chidester, first wife and mother of Sean and Anne and Jan Darling, mother of Jeanne, Rick and Greg. He was pre-deceased by former wife, Amy Stromsten, mother of Jennifer. Jennifer Stromsten Greenfield, MA