Charla Krupp

Charla Krupp

    Charla Krupp, a fount of information for women all over the world who want to look younger and thinner, died on Jan. 23 at home in Manhattan of breast cancer.
    Although she was 58, according to a former colleague, she looked younger in her 50s than she had in her 30s.
    Ms. Krupp had spent time on the East End starting in the mid-1980s and owned a house in Sagaponack with her husband, Richard Zoglin, who survives.
    Already an acknowledged style expert, in 2008 Ms. Krupp wrote “How Not to Look Old,” followed in 2010 by “How to Never Look Fat Again: Over 1,000 Ways to Dress Thinner — Without Dieting!” The books were on The New York Times best-seller list for 22 weeks. “How Not to Look Old” reportedly sold more than 300,000 copies.
    Aside from the nonsurgical appeal and simplicity of her solutions, Ms. Krupp was considered to have an accessible “real woman’s” approach to beauty and fashion, likely another reason for the popularity of her ideas among women in all sorts of professions.
    Charla Miriam Krupp was born on Jan. 29, 1953, in Chicago, a daughter of Walter and Esther Krupp. She grew up in Wilmette, Ill., a Chicago suburb, with her younger brother and sister.
    She was editor in chief of her school newspaper, the New Trier West News, and went on to graduate at the top of her class from the University of Illinois College of Communications, where she studied journalism. Following college she won a summer internship at Glamour in New York City, after which she stayed to pursue a career in journalism.
    Ms. Krupp was Glamour magazine’s entertainment editor for 15 years during which she interviewed many actors and celebrities from Meryl Streep to Madonna and wrote stories on how sexism and ageism affected women in Hollywood. She also initiated Glamour’s Women of the Year Awards. When criticized for suggesting that it was advisable for women of her generation to conceal their age, she countered that “looking good is about our personal and financial survival.”
    Ms. Krupp left Glamour to work as a senior editor and television commentator for InStyle magazine but had a second stint at Glamour as beauty director starting in 1997. In 1999 she became founding editor of a beauty Web site, Eve.com. She also was a columnist for More magazine and a contributing editor at People StyleWatch, as well as a contributor to NBC’s “Today Show” for 10 years and a guest on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” “The View,” “The Rachael Ray Show,” “The Joan Rivers Show,” “Good Morning, America,” “Enterainment Tonight,” and “Access Hollywood.”
    While doing entertainment segments for “The Joan Rivers Show,” she and a fellow contributor were the first to critique the fashions on the red carpet at the Oscars. “It was so successful that the following year the E! channel decided to do it again — only they wanted a star, so they dumped Charla for Joan Rivers,” her husband recalled.
    Ms. Krupp and Mr. Zoglin, Time magazine’s theater critic, were married in 1992 and the two continued to rent houses in several hamlets here until they bought their Sagaponack house in 2010. She “so wanted to decorate a house and she did it with real flair, in French provincial style,” Mr. Zoglin said. The couple entertained often and, according to a close friend, Cindy Lewis, Ms. Krupp felt that her real home was in Sagaponack, not Manhattan.
    In addition to her husband, Ms. Krupp is survived by her mother, Esther Krupp of Northbrook, Ill., her sister, Lora Nasby of Murrieta, Calif., and her brother, Jay Krupp of Buffalo Grove, Ill. Two nieces also survive.
    A service was held on Jan. 25 at the Goldman Funeral Home in Skokie, Ill. There will be a memorial in Manhattan, which will be announced soon. The combined Krupp-Zoglin families have established the Charla Krupp Memorial Fund for Women in Media at the University of Illinois College of Media in her honor. Donations can be made in her name at the University of Illinois Foundation, 1305 West Green Street, Urbana, Ill. 61802.