Slow-Pitch: Fire Department Ends Season Undefeated

Alan Iscoe, the champions’ manager, said the undefeated season was “unprecedented . . . unbelievable.”

    The Montauk Fire Department’s entry in the Montauk slow-pitch softball league, a team that had on it some of the best players in the for-now-defunct Amagansett league — Andy Tuthill, Joe Sullivan, Rob Nicoletti, and Tommy Thorsen among them — sailed through the season undefeated, at 20-0.
    Alan Iscoe, the champions’ manager, said the undefeated season was “unprecedented . . . unbelievable.”
    In the playoffs, the Fire Department, whose pitcher was Nicoletti, swept the Ravens and defending-champion Raptors two games to none in the first rounds before sweeping Sloppy Tuna by scores of 12-3, 11-5, and 10-3 in the best-of-five final.
    Because of an elbow injury suffered on the job, Nicoletti, who can “make it rain,” as they say, could not pitch in the third game of the finale, but Rick White subbed for him ably.
    “We had no weaknesses, defensively or offensively,” said Iscoe. “We were as solid as a rock.”
    Thorsen, the first baseman, had seven hits in the final series, including two doubles.
    The Fire Department scored three runs in the first inning in game three. Ray Wojtusiak led it off with a walk, and Sullivan, Jorge Bello, Jorge Blanco, and Tyler DeVries-Wallace followed with base hits.
    The team tacked on two more in the second as White, Sonny Sireci, and Sullivan came through at the plate. Sloppy Tuna, a Dominican team whose player-manager is Jerry Uribe, scored its runs in the third, though Montauk, which tacked on one more in that inning, continued the onslaught with three runs in the fourth and one in the fifth, the latter the result of a double by Tuthill.
    “John Ward and Bill Becker did a great job,” Iscoe added. “Bringing in Amateur Softball Association umpires helped a lot.”
    Ward, who reportedly plans to have a fall league at the Hank Zebrowski memorial field as well, has said that the wood bats have helped to keep the games there competitive.
    The women’s league playoff trophy in Amagansett was won by Provisions, though it came as the result of a default by Groundworks, which had won the first game of the best-of-three finale.
    Groundworks had on its roster a number of collegians, who had to return to school during the season’s final week.
    When questioned, Lori Schultz of Provisions, who has spent most of her career with championship teams, said that the college players would probably be affected however the schedule were arranged, “whether we begin the season early and end early, or begin late and end late.”    The Montauk Fire Department’s entry in the Montauk slow-pitch softball league, a team that had on it some of the best players in the for-now-defunct Amagansett league — Andy Tuthill, Joe Sullivan, Rob Nicoletti, and Tommy Thorsen among them — sailed through the season undefeated, at 20-0.
    Alan Iscoe, the champions’ manager, said the undefeated season was “unprecedented . . . unbelievable.”
    In the playoffs, the Fire Department, whose pitcher was Nicoletti, swept the Ravens and defending-champion Raptors two games to none in the first rounds before sweeping Sloppy Tuna by scores of 12-3, 11-5, and 10-3 in the best-of-five final.
    Because of an elbow injury suffered on the job, Nicoletti, who can “make it rain,” as they say, could not pitch in the third game of the finale, but Rick White subbed for him ably.
    “We had no weaknesses, defensively or offensively,” said Iscoe. “We were as solid as a rock.”
    Thorsen, the first baseman, had seven hits in the final series, including two doubles.
    The Fire Department scored three runs in the first inning in game three. Ray Wojtusiak led it off with a walk, and Sullivan, Jorge Bello, Jorge Blanco, and Tyler DeVries-Wallace followed with base hits.
    The team tacked on two more in the second as White, Sonny Sireci, and Sullivan came through at the plate. Sloppy Tuna, a Dominican team whose player-manager is Jerry Uribe, scored its runs in the third, though Montauk, which tacked on one more in that inning, continued the onslaught with three runs in the fourth and one in the fifth, the latter the result of a double by Tuthill.
    “John Ward and Bill Becker did a great job,” Iscoe added. “Bringing in Amateur Softball Association umpires helped a lot.”
    Ward, who reportedly plans to have a fall league at the Hank Zebrowski memorial field as well, has said that the wood bats have helped to keep the games there competitive.
    The women’s league playoff trophy in Amagansett was won by Provisions, though it came as the result of a default by Groundworks, which had won the first game of the best-of-three finale.
    Groundworks had on its roster a number of collegians, who had to return to school during the season’s final week.
    When questioned, Lori Schultz of Provisions, who has spent most of her career with championship teams, said that the college players would probably be affected however the schedule were arranged, “whether we begin the season early and end early, or begin late and end late.”


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