Habitat

A contemporary North Haven house departs from the norms
A sculpture of horses by Robert L. Hooke, an artist who lives in Sag Harbor, welcomes visitors to Susan Goldstein’s North Haven house. Her daughter is a professional equestrian. Durell Godfrey
A dramatic dining table was fashioned from two ancient cherry trees that were ready to fall. A glass wall of water creates soothing sounds and divides the living room into two seating areas.
The fixtures in a bathroom and its counter reflect distinctive taste. Custom-fabricated corner windows provide dramatic views while helping lower the cost of heating and cooling.Durell Godfrey photos
Projecting balconies and strong horizontal volumes bring Frank Lloyd Wright to mind. A dramatic, three-story rotunda is the axis of the house; the balcony leads to the bedrooms.Durell Godfrey photos
A fieldstone wall and tables using wood from the property’s cherry trees bring rusticity into the living room. The stair treads were also fabricated from the trees.Durell Godfey Photos

Did Anne Boleyn take shelter under these beams?
A birdhouse marks the view of the Tiedemanns’ house from the south.
Left, the “bones” of a 500-year-old barn come from the Boleyn family’s Hever Castle in England. Right, Georgica Pond in East Hampton can be seen from more than one side of the great room. Durell Godfrey Photos
The family enjoys the tranquil waters of Georgica Pond from one side of the house.
Dining in the sunroom, with its sweeping views of moors, Georgica Pond, and Georgica Beach, contrasts with meals at the formal dining room table, below left, which seems to await a feast for royalty.
Right: Books and a quirky folk art bicycle rider fill the center of the great room.
At left: Carl Tiedemann collected tools to make full use of the space between the beams. Right: A whimsical ladder is by the artist and studio furniture maker Tommy Simpson.
Tudor-style paneling geometrically complements a mantelpiece and its eclectic assortment.

The mosaics on the exterior and interior of the pool house at the J.P. Kazickas house on Egypt Lane depict scenes from the myth of Jurate and Kastytis. Durell Godfrey, photos
A detail of the Kazickas house exterior
The Kazickas living room
The Daniel S. Dokos and Brian Graybill house on Hither Lane had its pool open still, even as snow fell in Connecticut.
Mr. Dokos plays the piano in this room after dinner parties.
This room demonstrates the mix of mid-century and traditional in their classic summer colony cottage.
The Sheehan House on Egypt Lane was indicative of a more traditional design aesthetic.
A game room and gym were some of the appealing features of the DeFlorio house and guest cottage on Buell Lane
The DeFlorio gym
An Yves Klein table was a prominent feature of the living room.

An Alfred Scheffer Landmark Given New Life
A second story was added and the original chimney extended, top, but the renovated section retains the original vocabulary. Durell Godfrey
Doc Whitmore, founder of the C. Whitmore Garden Center in Amagansett, planted this European copper beech in the 1950s.
The dining room has original wide-plank white oak flooring.
The Calcutta Gold marble countertop is great for rolling out dough.
A wooden door with a leaded, blown-glass window, at left, is original. The brick floor of the breakfast room is original, although the ceiling was raised and an outdoor patio added.
A half-inch thick, floor-to-ceiling curved glass window has survived intact for 60 years.

“People love the finished work, but they also love the story that came along with it,”
Jason Biondo, left, and Donnie Disbrow crafted this massive live-edge table in a Montauk client’s house from an old-growth eastern white pine using a technique called bookmatching, in which a thick slab is cut down the middle and fitted together so that both sides of the piece are almost mirror images of each other. They built a kitchen island in the house from the same tree. Carissa Katz
A floor made from salvaged oak at a house on Montauk’s East Lake Drive
A live-edge cherry slab in a Montauk powder room in Culloden Shores.
An accent wall from antique hemlock milled to different lengths and thicknesses in Mr. Biondo’s own houseJason Biondo
Hand-hewn oak beams salvaged from a barn in a Ditch Plain renovation.

In 1790 Sag Harbor was a bustling port and an important New York, well, almost-city
Carl Hribar has worked on this whale topiary in front of his Sag Harbor house for 20 years. “It’s a whaling village,” he deadpanned.
There once was a wall separating the kitchen from the sitting room, but the space has been opened. Note the late-18th-century beams.
Carl Hribar’s wife, Ki Hackney, is a fan of window seats as seen in the living room.
The dining room was added in 1910, just one of many changes in the long life of the Hampton Street house.

One of the old summer colony’s few remaining relatively untouched estates
Don’t mistake the floribunda hydrangea, above, for the common “grandiflora” variety, which has much bigger flowers and fewer of them, although both kinds grow well by the sea.
Tulip trees, like the one at left on Ocean Avenue, are not often planted today, because they need so much room to develop.The Hinoki cypress’s root structure, right, resembles an elephant’s foot and is almost certainly a graft.
The hardness of the blue Spanish fir needles discourage deer.
An ancient yew

A peripatetic couple at home in Sag Harbor
Every room in the 1,250-square-foot house David Berridge designed for his family on the coast of New Zealand has an ocean view. Patrick Reynolds
David Berridge and Cathleen McGuigan relaxed in their backyard in Sag Harbor in July.Carissa Katz
Mr. Berridge helped the artist Jennifer Bartlett turn a former warehouse and union hall in Brooklyn, above and below, into her home and studio. Adam Friedberg Photos
Left, the New Zealand house is nestled in a striking New Zealand landscape. Right, the lower level of the house, Ms. McGuigan said, “completely opens in the front and back,” and has “everything you need and not one thing more.”Patrick Reynolds Photos

The newest house on the block is the oldest there
A Dominy-type candle stand, circa 1800, is among the furniture in the living room,above, as is a Victorian caned rocker, circa 1850-75. A pine peel for the beehive oven, circa 1800, is next to the fireplace. Below, a flax wheel from New England, circa 1750, occupies a landing with stoneware jugs, circa 1830.
The Ireland house, the oldest on the lane, has pride of place.
A portrait attributed to Orlando Hand Bears (1811-1851) of Sag Harbor hangs in the living room above a Queen Anne tiger maple desk, circa 1750. At right, wide horizontal and vertical siding and the deep treads of the stairs testify to the house’s age.
A tribal Kazak-type scatter rug from Turkestan, circa 1800, is in the living room.
The 13 original house lots are shown on this 1983 map drawn by Hamilton Darby, an architect from Bridgehampton.
A turtleback Sheraton fancy chair, circa 1825, left, and an English Windsor arm chair of yew wood, circa 1840, have been in the house since the 19th century. Durell Godfrey Photos