Habitat

Ed Hollander’s new book is a gorgeous how-to for Hamptons landscape design
Although Edmund Hollander and his associates design landscapes on a variety of terrains, many of the images in the book are properties on water. But even in East Hampton, he noted that there are very diverse habitats including ocean, marshes, fields, and woodlands, that make a typical “Hamptons” landscape hard to define. Instead of a coffee-table book, “The Private Oasis” is more of a how-to guide for people looking for ideas for their own properties with separate sections on pools, entries, outdoor living, and dining. Charles Mayer Photos

It is they that heal the interrupted, spaded-up earth with green

The Helen of Troy or Cleopatra of the floral world
The Kollers plant miniatures as groundcover under a small maple in a container, the author has adapted the idea for her own lawn. Abby Jane Brody Photo

Elements of the past are conserved in a bright, 21st-century makeover
Reflections in the glass wall of the late Costantino Nivola’s studio offer a playful look at the house, which his son moved and reconstructed. Durell Godfrey Photo

Two old buildings and a surprising new one reflect nature and architectural possibilities.
The dining room, with a folding door and a screen that comes down from the ceiling, opens to a deck. The partners made the table themselves. Erik Freeland

The LongHouse Reserve is anything but typical
“Good Luck in the Water” by Kate McCarty won second place last year.

An antiques-filled cottage, made livable by Mary Emmerling
Wooden beams, along with wood walls and floors, speak of the house’s age, while most of the furnishings are vintage. Durell Godfrey

Michael Derrig
Michael Derrig Morgan McGivern

Coreopsis Full Moon is self-cleaning and flowers till Thanksgiving.
Coreopsis Full Moon is self-cleaning and flowers till Thanksgiving. Abby Jane Brody