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“Art is about thinking, looking, and meditating about the work"
Mary Heilmann, center, met up with a family visiting from Ireland at Robert and Joanne Comfort’s farm stand in Bridgehampton on Saturday. One of her chair sculptures and a ceramic bowl of hers are displayed behind them. Morgan McGivern
Mary Heilmann’s Bridgehampton studio contains current and archival work that she sometimes uses for inspiration. Morgan McGivern
“First Date,” from last year, was painted on paper Ms. Heilmann made with Ruth Lingen and Akemi Martin. The intense green of her work is often inspired by her farm. Thomas Muller

He has made it in a manner that honors the way food was cooked ages ago
Adam Kelinson has funneled his knowledge of food, plants, and international cultures into his open-fire cooking techniques. Christine Sampson

A visit to his East Hampton basement studio brought to mind the French word bricolage, which refers to a construction made using available materials
Nick Tarr’s basement studio is jam-packed with artwork, including dozens of the illuminated dioramas that were his signature for many years, as well as objects and images he has yet to repurpose in his photographs and collages. Mark Segal
“Sorcerer’s Epitaph” includes images and objects that celebrate his father, Bill Tarr.

The new position has an element of déjà vu for Ms. Kirwin
Amy Kirwin enjoyed an unseasonably warm spring day on the front steps of the Southampton Arts Center, where she was recently named director of programs. Corinne Lavinio

Classic and new at the same time
The three-story tower addressed the owner’s desire for a space with a great view that fit architecturally. A focal point of the facade, it is also the heart of the interior, with its dramatic central staircase rising from the basement to the owner’s office aerie. Durell Godfrey Photos
A small Bavarian table from 1880 is set against a hand-painted mural that covers two of the living room walls. Durell Godfrey Photos

Alejandro Saralegui, who took the helm of the Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack has kept its spirit alive
Madoo has a revitalized mission under the guidance of Alejandro Saralegui, below, who has refined and modernized the vision of Robert Dash, above, the garden and arts center’s founder, who died in 2013. Durell Godfrey
A few of the many views of Madoo, now celebrating its 50th year of organic gardening.Jennifer Landes
The purple gazebo is one striking example of Robert Dash's ebullient use of color throughout his garden.Jennifer Landes
An interior view of the studio and exhibition spaceDurell Godfrey
A photograph of Robert Dash in 1972 indicates just how dramatically he transformed the landscape of his property. The bench is still there, now painted in orange and blue. John Reed
An aerial view of the property before it became Madoo.
Alejandro Saralegui demonstrating how they will train honeysuckle to grow up the dead iris junipers to give them a new purpose in the garden.Jennifer Landes
A view out to the garden from Madoo's new greenhouse.Jennifer Landes
The pond will soon have a new liner and the bridge will remain a quiet respite with colorful accents.Jennifer Landes
New trees and shrubs will continue to be trained into whimsical shapes and designs.Jennifer Landes

David Slater's idiosyncratic, image-packed canvases are drenched in dreams, memories, tokens of a peripatetic existence, and a strong spiritual connection to Indian culture
Outside of his studio, David Slater casts a striking figure in the greater world of Sag Harbor. Below, Mr. Slater’s “Legend of the Sea Maiden” is a collage of provocative, mysterious images and words drawn from the artist’s dreams, memories, and the occasional hallucination. Morgan McGivern amd Gary Mamay Photos
In “The Ghost in the Garden,” the specter of a young boy from the 19th century cavorts in David Slater’s lush garden. Gary Mamay
David Slater working on a portrait of John Steinbeck that will be shown at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum in July.Morgan McGivern
This image was taken from the Broken Mast Memorial at Oakland Cemetery in Sag Harbor.Gary Mamay
"Out of Body" was inspired one of Mr. Slater's out-of-body experiences.Gary Mamay
Mr. Slater spent several years in Minneapolis, memories of which fill this painting.Gary Mamay

All the participating artists live in Springs
Dennis Leri’s “Contemplation #3”, left, will be situated at the intersection of Old Stone Highway and Parsons Place. Right, James DeMartis's “Near Perfect,” a minimalist block of CorTen steel, will sit between the blacksmith shop and the Springs Library.
Loring Bolger, who organized “A Summer of Sculpture” with Christina Strassfield, Guild Hall’s museum director, in front of the Parsons Blacksmith Shop, where sculptures by Paul Pavia and James DeMartis will be installed Morgan McGivern

Artists-in-residence at the Hampton Ballet Theatre School in Bridgehampton
Adam Baranello, left, and Gail Baranello, the co-founders of A&G Dance Company, are performers, teachers, and artists on the South Fork. They demonstrated a piece from their repertoire, “Just Keep Going.” Durell Godfrey

Virva Hinnemo adopted cardboard as her primary material last summer
Virva Hinnemo with “Two Things,” one of her recent large-scale paintings on cardboard Morgan McGivern
Virva Hinnemo’s application of broad, sweeping brushstrokes to found cardboard is highlighted in “Giant.”
Virva Hinnemo's "Twin Thought" makes use of a guitar box.