Villages

Perry Santanachote and Alastair Coy Wallace






Marius Fortelni, who expressed his anger over the Sag Harbor Village zoning code revisions at a meeting in January, has now filed suit against the village. Morgan McGivern

Paige Daniels, right, and Hailey Rigby, left, second-graders at Springs School, tried their hands at solar prints, using sun-reactive paper. Christine Sampson
John Conner, left, offered a few thoughts in remembrance of his friend Ralph Carpentier, a well-known artist from Springs who died in February, after a cherry tree was planted in Mr. Carpentier's memory. Mr. Conner is pictured with his wife, Henrika.
A young cherry tree was planted in honor of Ralph Carpentier, a well known artist from Springs who died in February.
Nicole Castro, 8, left, and her sister Andrea Castro, 4, reached for art supplies — beads, pipe cleaners pom-poms and such — as they took part in a mixed-media workshop led by Trish Franey.
Wolfman, a professional drummer, led a workshop on traditional African drumming. The Springs School was able to purchase the drums through a grant from the Greater East Hampton Education Foundation.
Linda Capello, right, instructed two East Hampton High School freshmen, Jennifer Villacis, center, and Emily Lupercio, left, in the basics of charcoal drawing.
Sam Piver, left, and Cody Debackere, center, third-graders at Springs School, made their own stamps in a printmaking workshop led by Kym Fulmer.
Irena Grant, a visiting artist, helped Maria Goncalves's kindergarten students learn about puppetry and storytelling by making their own puppets.
Maria Goncalves's kindergarten class made these reproductions of the famous work "Starry Night" by Vincent Van Gogh.
Gavin Long, 7, center, created his own original button as his sister Caitlin, 4, and the instructor Andy Piver, right, looked on.


Pleasant Lane, a two-way, dead-end street that ends near the village's long-term parking lot, will remain that way after residents opposed the village's exploration of opening it up into the lot and making it a partial one-way street. Christine Sampson photos
Francine Hanford, who has lived on Pleasant Lane most of her life and who opposed the proposed changes, told the village board to "leave our street alone."
Another view of Pleasant Lane, a dead-end street