Villages

The beetle has distinctive markings that are easy to recognize. USDA

Rico, right, and Gina, left, may be deaf and blind respectively, but like many dogs, they go right for a slipper to chew on. Bryley Williams
Rico, the deaf sibling at right, has black speckles on his nose and Gina, the blind dog, has blue eyes.Bryley Williams
ARF employees with Rico and Gina.Durell Godfrey

Mayor Paul F. Rickebach Jr., center, and Richard Lawler, right, an East Hampton Village Board member, thanked Jerry Larsen for his service to the village as he prepared to leave his post in January. Christopher Walsh

Sunday marks the opening day of the Hampton Classic Horse Show, which will run until Sept 3. Durell Godfrey

The fireworks show over Main Beach starts at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday. Michael Heller photos
The East Hampton Fire Department, made up solely of volunteers, depends on donations for the fireworks show.

Heart lab and cancer center to open soon
State officials were on hand for the unveiling of the new Stony Brook Southampton Hospital sign at the entrance to the hospital on Monday. The official merger took place on Aug. 1. Taylor K. Vecsey

The marchers stopped at Clinton Academy, where they were welcomed before moving on to the East Hampton Library, where Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul and others spoke. Durell Godfrey
Durell Godfrey
Arlene Hinkemeyer, center, organized the rally.Durell Godfrey
Durell Godfrey
From left, County Legislator Bridget Fleming, Jeff Bragman, a candidate for East Hampton Town Board, and Councilwoman Kathee Burke-Gonzalez attended the rally.Durell Godfrey
There were plenty of men in attendance, too. From left, Charlie Brock, East Hampton Village Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., and Rick Lawler, a village board member.Durell Godfrey
"She's here to support women's reproductive rights," Molly Gaebe said of her puppet, Eunice the Uterus. Ms. Gaebe was at the march representing the Lady Parts Justice League with friends from Brooklyn, all of whom wore banners they had made themselves and pins with pictures of African-American women. Carissa Katz

As dory squad waned, East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue took its place
Volunteers stay fit and ready for ocean emergencies through twice-weekly drills that involve swimming, hauling pretend victims out of the sea, and carrying them to safety onshore. Judy D’Mello
Matt Norklun, an East Hampton volunteer lifeguard for 10 years, enjoyed some downtime with Steve McMahon, a fellow volunteer rescue swimmer. Matthew Charron
Unloading a Jet Ski at Atlantic Avenue Beach in Amagansett for specialized training required for rescues in rough seas. About half of the volunteers are certified Jet Ski operators. Matthew Charron
Katie Osiecki, one of three East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue captains, went over plans with T.J. Calabrese, the organization’s chief, during its monthly meeting at the Dory Rescue Barn in Amagansett. Matthew Charron

Durell Godfrey