Arts

Allan Zola Kronzek is not your stereotypical magician. During a recent conversation at his house in Sag Harbor, he neither pulled a rabbit out of a hat nor sawed his wife, Ruby Jackson, in half.

It’s a curious phenomenon that in the world of literature and drama so little has been made of both the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements.
We don’t often think of artistic history on the South Fork extending back before 1945. When we do, it is usually the late-19th-century names of Moran and Chase that come to mind.
“Best of Enemies,” a documentary by Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville about the 1968 television debates between Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley Jr., will inaugurate the Hampton International Film Festival’s SummerDocs series on July 11.
The Perlman Music Program will present “Classical Collaborations” concerts at the Jewish Center of the Hamptons on Saturday and at the Southampton Cultural Center on Sunday.
“Chuck Close,” a documentary by Marion Cajori, will be screened Friday, June 19, at 6 p.m., at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, where an exhibition of the artist’s photographs is on view.
The Watermill Center will present an open rehearsal of “Flying Point,” a multimedia portrait of the contemporary Shinnecock community and the tribe’s history, on Saturday.
Many new shows open with new materials and interesting installations.
This could very well be the year of Dustin Yellin. It began with an installation of 12 of his “Psychogeographies,” shown first at Lincoln Center and then at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.