Books

One of Barney Rosset’s first acquisitions for Grove Press was with an unknown writer named Samuel Beckett, an Irishman who lived in France, wrote in French, and was rejected by French publishers.

In “A Legacy of Valor: A History of Lifesaving and Shipwrecks at Montauk,” Henry Osmers writes of how, given the remoteness of the area and its lack of population, it was difficult to help ships that fell victim to storm, fog, or other maritime peril.
Writing at the Parrish. A Frost Farm Prize for Caitlin Doyle.

Ryan White captures the carefree nature of 1970s Key West, where Jimmy Buffett launched his career, through rhapsodic passages and interviews detailing bottle-born mischief.

Janet Lee Berg’s novel “Rembrandt’s Shadow” is loosely based on wartime experiences of the wealthy Katz family, who exchanged Dutch masterpieces for Jewish lives.

Sheila Kohler’s “Once We Were Sisters” is a story of betrayals. Not a thousand pinpricks. A thousand sword thrusts.

For National Poetry Month, a look at the poems in “Pushcart Prize XLI: Best of the Small Presses."
Alec Baldwin's memoir is more rueful than contentious, and intermittently evocative and wise.

The setting for this tale of multiple mysteries is a prosaic but familiar one: Suffolk County.
Poetry Readings, Two of ’Em

If there is a subtext to Bill Schutt’s latest book, it is to question the origin and the reasonableness of the taboo against consuming other humans.

E.L. Doctorow's famous authorial confidence, political commentary, and explorations of family life are on masterful display in this posthumous collection.

Jean Kennedy Smith uniquely offers the vantage point of a kindhearted sister in a history-making set of siblings.