Books

“Do Angels Need Haircuts?” features early Lou Reed poems, related notes, photographs, cover images from rare poetry zines, and a seven-inch record of previously unreleased audio of a 1971 reading at St. Mark’s Church.

By Kathy Engel, from “Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology”

A.M. Homes, one of our darkest surrealists, is out with a grimly entertaining new collection of short stories.
The deep and eventful past of an American beauty, Sag Harbor, cataloged in historical photos and explanatory captions.

A novel about class and corruption that skewers the elitist communities of private schools in Manhattan and the Upper East Side.
While Robert Hilburn clearly sees almost all of Paul Simon’s oeuvre as works of staggering genius, it’s true his impact on popular and world music has been profound.

In his new memoir, Keith Hernandez hops around his life’s timeline, from present-day trials as a broadcaster to Little League in California, but he always returns to his coming of age as a player in the 1970s.

An offshoot of Barney (Grove Press) Rosset’s interest in film was The Evergreen Review, devoted to articles that dealt with the theory and practice of cinema between 1958 and 1973.

Mary Cummings turns a bit player in the infamous Stanford White case, the district attorney, into an antihero, using his rise and fall to tell the tale of the true “crime of the century.”
John Jermain’s One for the Books has cocktail parties with writers, artists, and a filmmaker at houses across Sag Harbor.
Brainteasers, questions of logic, tests of deductive reasoning face six teens foolish or desperate enough to enter the subterranean Initiation in Chris Babu’s debut novel for young adults.

From “Blue Rose,” a new collection by Carol Muske-Dukes
To be buried or cremated, that is the question for one skirt-chasing, peep show-visiting, Bukowski-reading baby boomer.