“Orange is the new black” is the way one visitor described a dominant trend at this year’s Chelsea Flower Show in London two weeks ago. Chelsea is to the gardening world what Paris is to high fashion.
Gardening worldwide is undergoing a sea change as ecological considerations become more influential in our garden-making decisions.
Those who love looking at other people’s gardens are in for a treat this weekend. The South Fork is celebrating National Public Gardens Day tomorrow, while on Saturday the Garden Conservancy will hold one of its Open Days, when the public can stroll through five private gardens.
There are few places in East Hampton Town that have updated their look without sacrificing their history. Old Stone Highway is one of those places, with careful renovations and restorations of classic Springs buildings and gardens aplenty.
Like all living things, plants are organized into natural units or families based on their genetic similarities. Understanding what family your favorite garden plant is a member of can help you better care and plan for it. For a botanist, looking at...
In 1986, two Amagansett neighbors, Bill Shank, an architectural designer, and John Whitney, a garden designer and horticulturist, often found themselves having conversations over their common back fence about horticulture. They realized that they...
Look a little more closely and you will find some remarkable and unusual plantings. There are cacti in the dunes and cranberries in the bogs of Napeague and Montauk.
Crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia) was virtually unknown in our area as recently as three decades ago. Two things changed that.
The house and grounds have been “greened,” to use a catchall term for changes that have redefined the landscape and reduced the need for maintenance and overall consumption of energy.