Outdoors

It’s said that the two best days in the life of a boat owner are the day the boat is bought and the day it’s sold. While there is much truth in this running joke among boat owners, the laughs haven’t discouraged many from joining their ranks.
We don’t think of trees as flowering plants, but they are. Oak flowers are just past peaking. The male flowers, called catkins, have shed most of their pollen and are dropping shriveled and brown en masse.
After achieving a historic low in the 1960s, owing to wide use of DDT and other pesticides, the Long Island osprey populations have bounced back and are still rising. But the increasing number of cormorants and seals in our waters since the 1990s is nettling their comeback, and now there is a third competitor on the scene to contend with — one...
Catch or release? That’s the question every angler must answer when a hooked fish is finally in hand.
Spring is moving right along in good stead. A car ride through the local roads gives one an up-to-date reading of its progress. Today, for example, during a back-and-forth, up-and-down trip through the back roads of Northwest Woods, the signs of advancing spring were readily apparent.
Every angler has a favorite lure in his or her tackle box. For some it’s a simple bucktail jig. For others it’s a wood plug or a shiny tin. But for many anglers it’s a Rapala, the Original Floater, the classic balsa wood minnow imitation.
Following the end of World War II there was a big building boom across the country as our servicemen came back from the European and Pacific theaters to resume the American way of life that they missed during four years of nonstop fighting against the Germans and Japanese.
The lifeblood of fishing has always been the tackle shop. It’s where anglers buy gear, tackle, and baits, learn where the fish are biting, and swap tales with fellow fishermen.
Anglers are drawn to new technology, particularly when it improves the performance of their gear and increases their catch. So it’s not surprising that software companies are developing mobile phone apps for fisherman. The market is huge. There are nearly 49 million recreational fishermen in the United States alone, according to the website...