government

A Montauk restaurant called before the East Hampton Town Board for a review of its music entertainment permit after being cited five times over the summer for violations of the town noise code has “made a decision to close” for good.
When the next New York State legislative session begins in January, Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. will once again propose a new fund for affordable housing on the East End.
East Hampton Town Board members stepped back Tuesday from an effort to reaffirm a town ban on bedrooms in basements, which has been on the books but not recently enforced, with one official calling it a “knee-jerk reaction” to a recent uproar over the construction of two eight-bedroom houses on half-acre lots in Springs.
Local Democrats and businesses welcomed Hillary Clinton on Sunday for a jam-packed day of fund-raising.
The status of a music permit issued to Ciao by the Beach, a Montauk restaurant that was cited five times this summer with violations of the East Hampton Town noise ordinance, is to be ruled on soon, following a hearing before the town board on Tuesday.
East Hampton Town’s Civil Service Employees Association voted down a four-year contract with the town on Aug. 6 in a landslide, 139-to-6, “no thanks” tally, just as town board members were ready to ratify it at a meeting the same day.
Next Thursday is Primary Day, and Independence Party voters here will see a contest for the two town board seats up for re-election in November. Three candidates are vying for the party’s endorsement for the two seats.
Would-be condo developers say lots on Ferry Road are not for sale.
The question of whether East Hampton Town should continue to bar bedrooms in basements with tighter rules than those in place under the New York State building code was discussed at Town Hall last week.