Outdoors

Every angler has a favorite lure in his or her tackle box. For some it’s a simple bucktail jig. For others it’s a wood plug or a shiny tin. But for many anglers it’s a Rapala, the Original Floater, the classic balsa wood minnow imitation.
Following the end of World War II there was a big building boom across the country as our servicemen came back from the European and Pacific theaters to resume the American way of life that they missed during four years of nonstop fighting against the Germans and Japanese.
The lifeblood of fishing has always been the tackle shop. It’s where anglers buy gear, tackle, and baits, learn where the fish are biting, and swap tales with fellow fishermen.
Anglers are drawn to new technology, particularly when it improves the performance of their gear and increases their catch. So it’s not surprising that software companies are developing mobile phone apps for fisherman. The market is huge. There are nearly 49 million recreational fishermen in the United States alone, according to the website...
Virginia Frati, who lives up the street from me, across from the Morton Wildlife Refuge, has been looking after injured and sick mammals, birds, turtles, frogs, and even snakes for 20 years.
While some dread the approach of April 15, others relish its arrival because it’s the opening of the striped bass season in New York State.
Global warming, rising seas, epidemic opioid use, earthquakes from oil drilling, blue-green algae, Zika virus, Ebola, Lyme disease, tidal waves, tornados, radiation leaks, autism, building collapses, drought, famine, pesticide poisonings, graft and corruption, suicide bombers, ISIS, the Taliban, and a passel of other afflictions have hit mankind...
If you paid attention to the news in February and March, you may know about the resurgence, at least locally, of one of the rarest of whales, the North Atlantic right whale, in New England coastal waters.
Some people say that we on the South Fork are going to hell in a handbasket. We look across the Peconics and see mostly green fields of grapes, vegetables, and other produce. Here most of the farmland is up for grabs, but thankfully that wonderful organization, the Peconic Land Trust, is out there grabbing. It is not only keeping viable farmland...