outdoors

Some people say that we on the South Fork are going to hell in a handbasket. We look across the Peconics and see mostly green fields of grapes, vegetables, and other produce. Here most of the farmland is up for grabs, but thankfully that wonderful organization, the Peconic Land Trust, is out there grabbing. It is not only keeping viable farmland...
Spring peepers, spring peepers, spring peepers, peep, peep, peeping away. It must be spring, I thought, and it was.
On Saturday morning when Friday’s snow had just begun to melt, I went on Eileen Schwinn’s annual Morton Wildlife Refuge bird walk under the auspices of the East End Audubon Society.
We have been defacing our 30 percent at an ever-increasing pace ever since the industrial revolution ramped up in the mid-1800s. Our factories and our wars are collectively changing the landscape overnight.
The southern pine borer that has been devastating pitch pine trees in the Central Pine Barrens including in Westhampton and Hampton Bays, leaving pitch pines mere skeletons from Long Island Sound to the Great South Bay next to the ocean.
The distribution of all of nature’s living things, including mosquitoes, is in flux.
There is another new nature book in town. This time the town is the Village of Sag Harbor and the nature in the book is Sag Harbor’s birds in photographs, poetry, prose, and other jits and jots.
It may be the most unusual winter I’ve witnessed here in my 63 years of residence on both forks.
Every winter it seems, we have one or two northeasters, but rarely does one come accompanied by both a blizzard and full moon tides. Such was the case over the weekend and we were still digging out on Monday. Some meteorologists are saying that we could have another storm, almost equally as strong, this coming weekend.