Articles

A Native American burial site, which was discovered in 1917 off Springs Close Highway in East Hampton, has split the town planning board down the middle in connection with a subdivision application for property across the street.
Administrators at East Hampton High School are hoping to do something about climate change — but not the environmental kind. Hundreds of students, teachers, and parents recently took a survey on the education, social relationships, and safety at the school, and the conclusion was that its atmosphere is “neutral.”
When the East Hampton Town Planning Board met on April 22, all the stars seemed — at first, anyway — to be aligned for the approval of a proposed 40-acre subdivision of mostly open Wainscott farmland into seven buildable lots and a large agricultural reserve.
The applicants sought additions and renovations to their house, as well as the demolition of an existing swimming pool and pool house and construction of a new swimming pool and accessory building to be used as a garage, storage area, and pool house.
As Baltimore erupted this week after the death of yet another person of color at the hands of police, it has become ever more clear that the ill treatment of minorities by police, particularly young black men, is not limited to any one city or town.
Ann Adele Watson, 88, a lifelong resident of East Hampton who had worked at the old East Hampton News Company and the Bank of the Hamptons, died on Sunday at the Hamptons Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Southampton.
Jack Louchheim, the seventh grader who plays third singles for East Hampton High School’s boys tennis team, came through with a huge come-from-behind victory at William Floyd Saturday.
A house on Georgica Road in East Hampton Village was burglarized sometime between April 17 and last Thursday, when the homeowner called police.
Constant readers, especially those with a flair for gardening, would have seen and I hope enjoyed The Star’s gardening supplement, which was part of last Thursday’s edition.