East Hampton Town and Southampton Hospital are moving quickly toward breaking ground on a emergency-care facility, possibly off Pantigo Road just east of Town Hall. Many questions remain, and we are concerned that in the eagerness to get moving, some of the numbers used to justify the roughly $40 million project are being overstated.
The whole social-media dance has gone on for a long time now but, given its growth and its impact on the world in which we live, it seems well past time for me to get with the program. I use a Mac for work and read and write emails all day, every day, but beyond that I really have not participated in the revolution in how people communicate with...
News that the Maidstone Club, having just gotten a new irrigation system in place for its golf course, now wants to build a new bridge over an upper reach of Hook Pond reminded me of my childhood in East Hampton Village. In those days, the mid-1970s, we could roam a lot more freely than kids can today.
When Rob Balnis asked if I were coming to work out Saturday morning, I immediately said yes, inasmuch as the football game would be Friday night, at Mercy.
We were going head to head the other day, in a wide-ranging discussion with some other longtime summer people turned almost-year-round, about never-ending construction on our streets and whose lost real estate opportunities and dumb decisions, over the years, were dumbest and lostest.
It’s important for fishermen to know what temperatures their target fish can tolerate, their local water temperature, and what factors determine water temperature.

On the night of Oct. 25, 1986, we left Huntington for Shea Stadium for what Mets fans refer to only as Game 6, no further explanation needed.
Since opening this spring, Art Space 98, at the upper end of Newtown Lane in East Hampton, has presented an eclectic group of artists. The owners, Rosemarie Schiller and Tho­mas Buhler, began by showing their own work, then followed with Camille Perrottet’s photography, video, and installation work and Michael Oruch’s geometric abstractions.
In 2008, when David Mamet debuted “November,” his play about the madness of American politics, he could have hardly foreseen the season of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. But he sure tried.