Articles

Two quote-unquote wo­men’s events took place here last weekend. The first was sponsored by the East End Women’s Alliance, which was active between 1971 and 1992 and staged annual Women’s Equality Day programs in August. The second was a fund-raiser for Eleanor’s Legacy, which encourages and helps, in its own words, “progressive, pro-choice women”...
About year ago, I am still embarrassed to admit, I missed a letter from Hillary Rodham Clinton. The thing is, I am not all that great about dealing with personal mail.
“Jack, you’ve got to see this,” Mary called out from her perch on the porch. “Yo vengo, yo vengo,” I said, moving sluggishly from the couch. And there, on the chimney, by the side of the little porch, it was.
Whenever I call my mom at our home in Portland, Ore., she always gives me the latest news happening on our block, which for the last several years has included a controversy after a permanent unisex bathroom (the cleverly designed “Portland Loo”) was installed in the neighboring public square.

I became a gay reader early, at age 9 or 10, when a well-meaning librarian introduced me to the Hardy Boys books. I was mesmerized by the scenes of the brothers, Frank and Joe, and their friends stripping down to swim across one body of water or another or to dry their rain-soaked clothing.
When shoppers at the East Hampton Farmers Market spend $40 or more tomorrow, they will be offered a ripstop poly-nylon reusable bag. When they look inside it, they will find a postcard explaining their good fortune.
Some many years ago, Joy Behar found herself on the receiving end of being taunted, behavior she typically instigates, not endures. She was performing one of her first comedic routines — she began her career when she was almost 40 — as an opener for the drummer Buddy Rich. The audience consisted of other drummers from Queens, and as Ms. Behar...
As a child in Santa Barbara, the first thing Celeste Gainey wanted to be when she grew up was a poet. That ambition was fully realized in March with the publication by Red Hen Press of her first book, “The Gaffer,” from which she will read selections at the Hampton Library in Bridgehampton on Tuesday.
“Cuba 1959,” an exhibition of photographs by Burt Glinn opens at the Tulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor. Pop in to the pop-up watercolor art show at Bridge Gardens in Bridgehampton on Saturday, Sunday, and Sept. 5 and 6. The show will benefit the Peconic Land Trust.