Articles

Sag Harbor’s John Jermain Memorial Library will present “1966: Cinema Breaks Free,” a series of three influential films from that pivotal year, and a related lecture.
An encore screening of the National Theatre’s London production of “Jane Eyre,” adapted from Charlotte Bronte’s novel, will take place Saturday at 7 p.m. at Guild Hall. Sally Cookson’s production, hailed by The Financial Times as “witty, impassioned, and bold,” was first staged by the Bristol Old Vic last year before moving to the National.
The White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton will open “Love and Passion,” a group exhibition of work by more than 50 artists, on Saturday, with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. “Michelle Stuart, Theatre of Memory: Photographic Works” is on view at the Bronx Museum of the Arts through June 26. A reception for the artist, who has a house in Amagansett, will...
It was perhaps only in passing that East Hampton Town supervisor Larry Cantwell mused last summer about a program by which troublesome nightclubs that draw the transient party crowd could be eliminated. But relatively little has been done about the nightlife issue since a massive public outcry at a July meeting in Montauk
As small pieces become known of the story of Ned, a free black man who lived in East Hampton during slavery’s waning days in the North, a larger question — about the scores of other African-Americans who lived here and how to memorialize them — has begun to come into focus.
Five years ago, the Supreme Court’s 5-to-4 decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission threw campaign finance reform out the window.
I am not sure if I can speak for even a small subset of newspaper people, but those of us who work at the Star office like to surround ourselves with things we pick up or have used in our work.
It is Mozart’s birthday as I write this, and that reminds me of what the late Steve Sigler said in an interview I did with him in March 1996, to wit, that Mozart was “all about reconciliation, total reconciliation — no wonder he died at 35.”
The two women hurried south, coats pressed to bodies as the wind picked up on Third Avenue. “It’s not the end of the world. It’s just. . . .”