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  • Paddlers for Humanity, an East Hampton-based nonprofit organization, has donated more than $80,000 to help fund youth mental health programs during the coming year at a handful of local schools.

    During tight budgetary times, when many districts are being asked to do more with less, the money will help ensure that access to mental health programs not only continues, but expands.

  • At a sparsely attended meeting Tuesday night, the East Hampton School Board discussed enrollment, programs for English language learners, and went over plans to fill the open seat on the board and school lunches, as it had at its last meeting, Sept. 2.

  • Patricia Hope wants to prove we have chiggers.
  • Starting this month, South Fork students will have access to a greater array of mental health offerings than ever before.
  • During Monday night’s Springs School Board meeting, the board swiftly tackled business related to the start of school.

    Eric Casale, the principal, provided updated enrollment numbers. As of last week, 735 students were enrolled in prekindergarten to grade eight, with 26 more currently being registered. At 761 students, such an enrollment would put Springs at 25 more students than at the start of school last year, and 70 more students than two years ago.

  • The East Hampton School Board had a full agenda Tuesday night, one that could be said to have gone from soup to nuts, just hours before the start of the new school year. Of particular interest were announcements that it had decided to appoint someone to fill the vacancy on the board left by Patricia Hope’s surprise resignation in July, that it would be posting a security guard at each of the three district schools, and that it had come up with a way to prompt those parents with outstanding balances for their children’s lunches to pay up.

  • Just before the start of school, the Springs School Board met briefly last week to finalize the district’s hiring plans for the coming year.

    In the spring, partly because of the district’s increasing enrollment, the board decided to hire a full-time superintendent. For the past few years, the position has been part time.

  • Following last year’s sharp decline in test scores, local school administrators had spent recent weeks on tenterhooks, anxiously awaiting the annual release of this year’s scores.
  • Monday night’s meeting of the Springs School Board tackled updates related to technology and enrollment, with the start of school less than one month way.

    At the sparsely attended meeting, Elizabeth Mendelman, the board president, expressed excitement at the start of a new school year. “I’m sure my kids aren’t that excited, but their mother certainly is,” she said.

  • In the wake of Patricia Hope’s surprise resignation one month ago, the East Hampton School Board’s decision about how to fill the vacancy has remained up in the air.