Author Information

Articles by this author:

  • The effect is warm and intimate, with children, no matter their needs, receiving a steady stream of individual attention
  •        Last Thursday night, the Springs School Board convened a special meeting during which its five members unanimously approved the hiring of three new employees. The board appointed Marion Flaherty as head bus driver, Kimberly Belkin as sixth-grade integrated co-teacher, and Diana Zuchelli as acting chairwoman of both the committee on special education and the committee on preschool special education.

  •        At Tuesday night’s meeting of the East Hampton School Board, Richard Burns, the district superintendent, updated the few audience members in attendance concerning the district’s ongoing lawsuit with Sandpebble Builders — a legal dispute now lasting more than six years.

  •        A noche para la familia, or family night, aimed at building a bridge between the Spanish and English-speaking communities in East Hampton, will be held in the East Hampton High School auditorium on Friday, Nov. 22, at 6.

           “There’s no trust between our community and the authorities,” said Oswaldo Palomo, a pastor with the Vida Abundante New York church in Wainscott, who is one of the organizers. “We have to build trust.”

  • The debate over whether to unleash drug-sniffing dogs at East Hampton High School cleared its last and final hurdle Tuesday night, with the school board unanimously voting to amend its policy
  •        With the recent plunge in the temperature, some Springs students and staff members have taken to dressing in layers — indoors as well as out.

  • Numeracy and coding classes offer middle schoolers new approach to math
  • During Tuesday night’s East Hampton School Board meeting, members heard a plea from a parent to do something about drugs offered for sale at East Hampton High School and weighed whether to deploy drug-sniffing dogs through the school’s halls.
  • Many classes at East Hampton Middle School have swelled in size since school began last month and are nearing 30 students, a number generally regarded by educators as the upper limit. Two classes have more than 30, with 32 eighth graders now squeezed into one section of earth science.
  • Two new administrators are in their posts at the Springs School prompting many in the community to hope they will provide newfound continuity following the administrative complexities that arose toward the end of the last academic year.