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Articles by this author:

  •    It’s been a long time since I’ve been single and in the market, but having a contractor do some work around the house this year kind of took me back to the thrills and insecurities of my dating days.

  •    When photography was invented, people said painting was dead, and when CDs came along, many thought vinyl recordings were dead. Then, with the rise of downloadable digital music, CDs looked destined for the trash heap.
        But things have a way of coming full circle. Painting is alive and well, and so, too, is vinyl, according to Craig Wright, who will open Innersleeve Records in Amagansett Square early next month, offering new and used LPs and CDs, along with rare poster art and music memorabilia.

  • On LTV, Stefanie Sacks wants to change how people think about eating
  •     The term “action painting” may have been coined to describe Jackson Pollock’s style of working, but it could be just as apt a description of a 4-year-old’s natural exuberance when faced with a blank white sheet, a vivid selection of paints, a turkey baster, and some sticks.

  •     In one sense, my basement flood couldn’t have happened at a better time. With Christmas approaching, the drive to accumulate (or should I say, more generously, “to give”) more worldly possessions grows ever stronger. The wanting is magnified. Consumerism calls. The pent-up demand begs for release.

  • East Hampton Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson has narrowly won a second term, claiming victory by the smallest margin in East Hampton Town history.
  •     The Charles H. Adams house, a newly restored Queen Anne-style gem on Lee Avenue in East Hampton, is impressive at any distance, but up close the fine craftsmanship is jaw-dropping.
        “It’s what makes the house unique,” Marsha Soffer said. Ms. Soffer oversaw the two-year restoration on behalf of the Fine Greenwald Foundation, a private charitable organization that inherited the house from her  uncle, Martin Fine, in 2008. She is a member of its board.

  • A razor-thin margin separated the two candidates for East Hampton Town supervisor on Tuesday afternoon as absentee ballots continue to be reviewed.
  • As of Saturday, according to Mr. Cohen, the board had received 799 ballots
  • The Republican incumbent, Bill Wilkinson, who was elected by a landslide in 2009 on promises to “right the town’s financial ship,” held a tenuous lead of just 177 vote over the Democrats’ Zachary Cohen.

Blogs by this author:

  • If the weekend is all about being with the kids, but you’d like to see something beyond the playground, head out to the LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton on Saturday.