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  • Carter Burwell chalks up his career to a series of fortunate accidents. Formally trained as a computer scientist, he studied animation and electronic music at Harvard, then wended his way to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he was the chief computer scientist for a few years.

  • As Election Day nears, endorsement announcements in the East Hampton Town race are beginning to trickle in.
  • Richard Haeg, who is running on the Republican and Conservative tickets for East Hampton Town Board, is a man of interesting parts.
  • The perception that domestic crimes are rare and occur primarily among those who have low incomes is a dangerous one.
  • Candidates argue about who did what and why
  •     Marked by a humble demeanor, a passion for Montauk’s wild beauty, and a local lineage that dates back to the 1700s, Peter Van Scoyoc is making his first serious bid for elected office as a town board candidate on the Democratic ticket.

  • The East Hampton Environmental Coalition announced one of its first initiatives: a questionnaire on environmental issues that will be distributed to all East Hampton Town Board candidates.
  •     As the wife of former East Hampton Town Republican Committee chairman and former State Assemblyman John Behan, Marilyn Behan of Montauk has been in the political sphere for more than 20 years, at her husband’s side at countless fund-raisers, state dinners, and other events. Now, she is entering the political fray on her own as one of the Indepenence Party’s candidates for East Hampton Town Board.

  •     The Civil Services Employees Association has announced its endorsement of several Democratic candidates including Zach Cohen for East Hampton Town supervisor and Sylvia Overby and Peter Van Scoyoc for town board, but also for the Republican candidate for highway superintendent, Stephen Lynch.

  •     Having survived a move from one place to another, a history of scandal and rumor, and seizure by the federal government, the Stafford Hedges house in East Hampton has remained intact for more than 230 years.
        William Ronan, who was chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and a close friend of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, moved the house from its original site on Pantigo Road (where a branch of the Hildreth department store is now) to Cross Highway, tucked between Middle and Hither Lanes, in 1954.