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Articles by this author:

  • The Town of East Hampton will participate in NY Prize, the state’s $40 million competition to design small-scale “green” power-generating stations known as microgrids.
  • Audrey Flack needs a shed at her Cottage Avenue property to store her work, she told the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday. But the 432-square-foot building, which would be just over 18 feet high, would require multiple variances that the board seems unwilling to grant.
  • A representative of the Surfrider Foundation local chapter has asked the East Hampton Town Trustees to speak out against a Montauk shoreline project.
  • The laughs were plentiful in Amagansett on a bitterly cold Friday night as Gordie George of the Parish of the Promised Land was crowned in the sixth annual pageant to raise money for the Donald T. Sharkey Memorial Community Fund.
  • The midwinter doldrums can be shaken off, at least temporarily, tomorrow night when the Stephen Talkhouse in Amagansett roars back to life to host the sixth annual Mr. Amagansett Pageant, a fund-raiser for the Donald T. Sharkey Memorial Community Fund.

  • Fighting Chance, a free cancer counseling and resource center in Sag Harbor, has incorporated both into its arsenal of tools with which patients can live and cope with their illness.
  • Citing “the amount of money coming into the village, and what this money can do,” Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. and his colleagues on the East Hampton Village Board heard last Thursday about the mushrooming number of basements that extend beyond the footprints of their houses, providing more living space but also adding more “density.”
  • Residents’ anxiety over being priced out of the modest houses they own on land they lease from the East Hampton Town Trustees at Lazy Point in Amagansett was evident during a lengthy and sometimes tense meeting on Tuesday night, with accusations heard that the members of the panel were continuing to be adversarial and belligerent.

    The trustees had previously announced their intention to raise annual leases to $6,000 per lot per year. Leaseholders now pay $1,500 per year.

  • Approximately 1,400 of the 3,000 nonresident parking permits for East Hampton Village beaches had been sold as of Monday, one week after they went on sale. The permits, which cost $375 for the season, are available on a first-come-first-served basis for nonresidents. Permits are free for village residents. They must be displayed on vehicles that park at Georgica, Main, Wiborg’s, Egypt, and Two Mile Hollow Beaches between May 15 and Sept. 15.

  • Susan Knobel, who for more than a year has sought permission from the East Hampton Town Trustees to move her house from a severely eroded shoreline at Lazy Point in Amagansett, had reason to celebrate on Tuesday night. The trustees, who have debated the request while often asking for additional information, voted to authorize Ms. Knobel to apply for the variance relief that she will need from the East Hampton Town Zoning Board of Appeals to relocate her house to nearby lots that are at a higher elevation.

Blogs by this author:

  • The State D.E.C. will temporarily close Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton to the harvesting of shellfish starting on Saturday due to the fireworks show.
  • Aerial spraying of the mosquito larvicides methoprene and VectoBac over Accabonac Harbor in East Hampton and Napeague in Amagansett, which was planned for Tuesday, has been postponed to Wednesday.
  • Weather permitting, Suffolk County’s division of vector control will apply methoprene via helicopter to parts of salt marshes at Napeague in Amagansett, Accabonac Harbor in East Hampton, and at Jagger Lane and North Sea in eastern Southampton.
  • Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. asked those attending the village board meeting on Friday to remain standing following the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance for a moment of silence to remember the nine people murdered in Charleston, S.C.
  • In a sure sign that spring isn't too far off, the Amagansett Chamber of Commerce has named the grand marshal of its seventh annual Am O'Gansett Parade, which will begin at 12:01 p.m. on March 14 and conclude a few minutes later.

    With a theme of "Music is the Message," Michael Clark, who owns Crossroads Music at Amagansett Square, has been named this year's grand marshal. The announcement came at noon on Thursday.

  • Motorists and shoppers may have been confused this month by the ticket-dispensing machines at the entrance to the Reutershan and Barns Schenck parking lots in the East Hampton Village business district. On some days this month, the machines, from which motorists are to take a ticket allowing two hours' parking, were covered and out of service. On other days, they were not.

  • The Clamshell Foundation will hold its Great Bonac Chili Cook-Off on Sunday at American Legion Post 419 in Amagansett as a kickoff to its membership and fund-raising drive.

    The entry fee for individual home cooks is $25; for professionals, it is $100. The contestants will be limited to 32, and advance registration is required. Those interested can do so online at clamshellfoundation.org, under the “events” page, or by filling out a registration form at the Legion post.

  • The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will present the next installment of its Architectural Sessions program on Friday at 6 p.m. PRO BONO: Architects Who Serve Humanity will feature a discussion focusing on two architects who volunteer their time to charitable causes.

  • Cormac Orr, a third-grade student at the John M. Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton, was named this year's honorary Mayor for the Day in East Hampton Village. A ceremony at which the other mayor, Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., read a proclamation honoring Cormac was held at the East Hampton Village Board's meeting on Friday.

    Cormac, who is 9, is a participant in Project Most, an after-school enrichment program for elementary students at the John M. Marshall and Springs Schools. He won two gold medals in the Special Olympics last year.

  • Christmas Eve
    On Wednesday, Christmas Eve services will happen at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church and St. Peter’s Catholic Church at 5 p.m., and a candlelight service at the Amagansett Presbyterian Church will begin at 7 p.m.

    A Christmas Day service will start at 9 a.m. at St. Peter’s.