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  •    Williamsburg, the Brooklyn neighborhood that exploded in popularity in the late 1990s, has come a long way — literally. As hopeful residents were priced out of its traditional borders, adjacent neighborhoods filled up and gentrified, pushing the neighborhood’s uber-cool phenomenon in every direction but west, where new high-rise buildings stop at the East River’s edge.

  •    Corky Laing, legendary rock ’n’ roll drummer and resident of Greenport, will return to the Bay Street Theatre on Saturday at 8 p.m. to perform “Heavy Metal Humor,” a one-man show that draws on his half-century as an entertainer.


        Mr. Laing, best known for his tenure in the group Mountain, performed his show, “The Best Seat in the House,” at Bay Street on May 18. His return engagement comes on the heels of two sold-out performances on Nantucket.

  • The issue of a public restroom in Amagansett — which has become something of an inside joke despite years of discussion — was abruptly pushed to the front burner when a land-use consultant announced that Randy Lerner has proposed a building that would house two unisex restrooms and a retail space.
  •     Like the post-Labor Day calm that descended on East Hampton Village last week, the village board’s work session last Thursday was brief, quiet, and uneventful.

  • For administrators at the Amagansett School, like those at other schools across the state, the new school year means exciting beginnings but also the return to a challenging set of new state and federal standards, known as the Common Core.
  •     Cochlodinium, or rust tide, has been discovered in Three Mile Harbor, Northwest Harbor, and Accabonac Harbor.

        At the meeting of the East Hampton Town Trustees on Tuesday night, Stephanie Forsberg, in the aquaculture report she delivered to her colleagues, reported the recent discovery. Cochlodinium, she said, is algae that can be fatal to shellfish and finfish, but is not harmful to humans when ingested.

  •    “It seemed like such a cool thing to do,” said David Browne, author and journalist. “Merge your love of music and love of writing.”
        Last month, Mr. Browne was a featured guest at Authors Night, the East Hampton Library’s annual fund-raiser. There, he signed copies of “Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, James Taylor, CSNY, and the Lost Story of 1970,” in which he examines these artists and their work in the context of the seismic political and historical events surrounding them.

  • A tussle between the East Hampton Town Trustees and the town’s Natural Resources and Planning Departments over fencing installed on town beaches was a topic of heated discussion
  • Informed speculation about the anchor’s origin is that it came from the Daniel Webster, which went aground in Amagansett on March 25, 1856
  •     The quality of the Town of East Hampton’s waterways, which are managed by the town trustees, is good, Stephanie Forsberg, a trustee, reported to her colleagues at the board’s meeting on Tuesday.

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  • Motorists and shoppers may have been confused this month by the ticket-dispensing machines at the entrance to the Reutershan and Barns Schenck parking lots in the East Hampton Village business district. On some days this month, the machines, from which motorists are to take a ticket allowing two hours' parking, were covered and out of service. On other days, they were not.

  • The Clamshell Foundation will hold its Great Bonac Chili Cook-Off on Sunday at American Legion Post 419 in Amagansett as a kickoff to its membership and fund-raising drive.

    The entry fee for individual home cooks is $25; for professionals, it is $100. The contestants will be limited to 32, and advance registration is required. Those interested can do so online at clamshellfoundation.org, under the “events” page, or by filling out a registration form at the Legion post.

  • The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will present the next installment of its Architectural Sessions program on Friday at 6 p.m. PRO BONO: Architects Who Serve Humanity will feature a discussion focusing on two architects who volunteer their time to charitable causes.

  • Cormac Orr, a third-grade student at the John M. Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton, was named this year's honorary Mayor for the Day in East Hampton Village. A ceremony at which the other mayor, Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., read a proclamation honoring Cormac was held at the East Hampton Village Board's meeting on Friday.

    Cormac, who is 9, is a participant in Project Most, an after-school enrichment program for elementary students at the John M. Marshall and Springs Schools. He won two gold medals in the Special Olympics last year.

  • Christmas Eve
    On Wednesday, Christmas Eve services will happen at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church and St. Peter’s Catholic Church at 5 p.m., and a candlelight service at the Amagansett Presbyterian Church will begin at 7 p.m.

    A Christmas Day service will start at 9 a.m. at St. Peter’s.

  • Lou Reed, the influential musician who died last year in Springs, is among the next inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The guitarist, singer, and songwriter, known for his work in the 1960s with the Velvet Underground and later as a solo artist, will be inducted in an April 18 ceremony at Public Hall in Cleveland. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame issued the announcement on Tuesday.

  • In the wake of highly publicized police killings of young African-American men, and the subsequent refusal of grand juries to indict the officers involved, a silent vigil for racial justice will happen Friday from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Bridgehampton war memorial.

  • The East Hampton Lions Club will host its fall blood drive for the Long Island Blood Bank on Monday from noon to 7 p.m. at the American Legion Post 419, at the corner of Montauk Highway and Abraham's Path. 

    The Lions Club, said Bob Schaefer, its president, has been helping with the blood drive for more than 40 years. The goal is to exceed 150 pints, each of which can help up to three people. 

  • A multi-agency drill for fire rescue and emergency medical services professionals and volunteers is scheduled for Sunday at 9 a.m. at Amagansett Farm, at 555 Montauk Highway in Amagansett. Severe weather will cancel the event.

    The drill is designed to coordinate assets in the event of a large-scale emergency and to allow local and regional agencies to work jointly on multiple scenarios. Participating emergency responders will practice the skills needed to execute rescues in difficult environments.

  • With Tuesday's voting just hours away, Representative Tim Bishop faces an uncertain future as a late Newsday/News 12/Siena College poll puts his challenger, State Senator Lee Zeldin, five points ahead at 50 percent to Mr. Bishop's 45 percent.