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  • The Maidstone Club, which last year was granted special and freshwater wetlands permits and area variances to upgrade the irrigation systems on its 18 and 9-hole golf courses, was back before the East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals on Friday.

    The club now seeks to build a 1,102-square-foot structure with a 214-square-foot patio, to be used for golf instruction in conjunction with an existing practice facility. The project would require a special permit as well as variance relief to allow an accessory building on a lot that does not have a main-use structure.

  • The water quality in bodies overseen by the East Hampton Town Trustees is generally excellent, according to a presentation at Town Hall on Monday, but algal blooms that can be harmful to shellfish, finfish, and humans remain a concern.

  • The East Hampton Village Board is expected to grant Starbucks an easement so that the sanitary system at its Main Street location can be upgraded. A resolution to grant the easement may be voted on at the board’s meeting on April 17 and the work is likely to be done in the fall.

  • Two and a half years after his death, Chris Stamp’s life continues to reverberate. Between his origins in East London and his later years in East Hampton, he left an indelible mark on rock ’n’ roll, and through it, the world.

  • Rescue, restore, repurpose, and recycle is the mantra for this brick-and-mortar version of the Bonac Yard Sale group on Facebook.
  • Plans to move the original Amagansett schoolhouse, built in 1802 by Samuel Schellinger, a millwright, are proceeding. At a meeting on Tuesday, Eleanor Tritt, the district’s superintendent, told the school board that the State Department of Education’s Office of Facilities Planning had approved the installation of a foundation for the schoolhouse, which is believed to be the oldest on eastern Long Island.

  • Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. noted, as the East Hampton Village Board gathered on Friday, that spring would officially begin that evening. With yet another snowstorm looming, however, the few members present read through a quick agenda.

    An unfinished new house on the Gardiner home lot, at 36 James Lane, drew attention as the board agreed to advertise for bids on its relocation or demolition. The house is behind the timber-frame house that was built in 1750. Bids will be opened on April 13 at 2 p.m. at Village Hall.

  • On behalf of the East Hampton Village Board, Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. sent a letter to East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell last week in which he commended the town board’s effort to address what he called “a long-standing and difficult issue,” that of the noise of air traffic on routes to and from the East Hampton Airport.

  • Crossroads Music, the Amagansett shop offering musical instrument sales and repairs as well as lessons, has once again expanded its event offerings with the introduction of the Tiny Room Show, an intimate concert in which an audience of 30 can see and hear a celebrated musician up close and extremely personal.

  • A project to determine how much nitrogen is entering the Peconic Bay through groundwater and identify its specific sources, which has been under way since fall, will conclude next month. A joint venture of Cornell Cooperative Extension, the Peconic Land Trust, the Noank Aquaculture Cooperative, and the National Grid Foundation, the findings will be presented this summer.

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