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Articles by this author:

  • The East Hampton Village Board will hold public hearings on May 15 on proposed amendments aimed at reining in outsized houses, accessory structures, and lot coverage, as well as basement living areas.
  • In an effort to improve the water quality of Hook Pond, which the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation has listed as impaired, the Village of East Hampton is planning projects to reduce stormwater runoff and contamination from aging or malfunctioning septic systems.

  • St. Thomas Chapel in Amagansett may become a base from which to build a year-round congregation serving the South Fork’s Latino community.
  • The lure of waterfront living, the stratospheric value of most South Fork real estate, and fear that a catastrophic weather event could destroy it all were starkly illustrated at Tuesday’s meeting of the East Hampton Town Trustees.
  • School boards in Amagansett, Sagaponack, and Montauk have finalized their proposed 2015-16 budgets.

    In Amagansett, the budget totals $10.5 million, with a tax levy of $8.75 million. Members of the school board were unanimous in voting to adopt it, said Eleanor Tritt, the district superintendent. It represents “a slight decrease in the tax levy,” she said.

  • Armed with evidence of sleeping accommodations in a finished storage space over a garage and pool house on Cove Hollow Road — something prohibited under East Hampton Village Code — the village’s zoning board of appeals appeared ready Friday to deny a request to keep the storage space, which includes a full bathroom.

    “They’re not using the upstairs portion for any kind of sleeping or habitable space,” Karen Hoeg, an attorney representing Lawrence and Lisa Cohen, told the board. “The bathroom is used very infrequently.”

  • Thomas A. Twomey’s sudden death in November came just five months after the grand-opening ceremony commemorating the East Hampton Library’s $6.5 million expansion and renovation. Mr. Twomey, a lawyer, civic leader, and chairman of the library’s board of managers, had played an integral part in the yearslong project, which added 6,800 square feet and houses the new children’s reading room and the Baldwin Family Lecture Room.

  • “The two bands complement each other. I really dig what they do, and love the fact that they sing, their vocals are big. I asked Gary if we could do a double bill, and he went for it. I called Telly, they were psyched to do it, and here we are.”
  • Amid a building boom, East Hampton Village is moving quickly toward further limiting the size of houses and additional structures it will allow on residential property.
  • East Hampton Village is soliciting bids from farmers interested in growing crops on the Gardiner home lot at 36 James Lane. The request for proposals, on two acres of the lot reserved for agriculture, stipulates a five-year commitment.

    Proposals should be submitted to Robert Hefner, the village’s director of historic services, at Village Hall, 86 Main Street, East Hampton 11937, no later than April 28. Specifications can be obtained there from the village administrator’s office, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Blogs by this author:

  • The State D.E.C. will temporarily close Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton to the harvesting of shellfish starting on Saturday due to the fireworks show.
  • Aerial spraying of the mosquito larvicides methoprene and VectoBac over Accabonac Harbor in East Hampton and Napeague in Amagansett, which was planned for Tuesday, has been postponed to Wednesday.
  • Weather permitting, Suffolk County’s division of vector control will apply methoprene via helicopter to parts of salt marshes at Napeague in Amagansett, Accabonac Harbor in East Hampton, and at Jagger Lane and North Sea in eastern Southampton.
  • Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. asked those attending the village board meeting on Friday to remain standing following the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance for a moment of silence to remember the nine people murdered in Charleston, S.C.
  • In a sure sign that spring isn't too far off, the Amagansett Chamber of Commerce has named the grand marshal of its seventh annual Am O'Gansett Parade, which will begin at 12:01 p.m. on March 14 and conclude a few minutes later.

    With a theme of "Music is the Message," Michael Clark, who owns Crossroads Music at Amagansett Square, has been named this year's grand marshal. The announcement came at noon on Thursday.

  • Motorists and shoppers may have been confused this month by the ticket-dispensing machines at the entrance to the Reutershan and Barns Schenck parking lots in the East Hampton Village business district. On some days this month, the machines, from which motorists are to take a ticket allowing two hours' parking, were covered and out of service. On other days, they were not.

  • The Clamshell Foundation will hold its Great Bonac Chili Cook-Off on Sunday at American Legion Post 419 in Amagansett as a kickoff to its membership and fund-raising drive.

    The entry fee for individual home cooks is $25; for professionals, it is $100. The contestants will be limited to 32, and advance registration is required. Those interested can do so online at clamshellfoundation.org, under the “events” page, or by filling out a registration form at the Legion post.

  • The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will present the next installment of its Architectural Sessions program on Friday at 6 p.m. PRO BONO: Architects Who Serve Humanity will feature a discussion focusing on two architects who volunteer their time to charitable causes.

  • Cormac Orr, a third-grade student at the John M. Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton, was named this year's honorary Mayor for the Day in East Hampton Village. A ceremony at which the other mayor, Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., read a proclamation honoring Cormac was held at the East Hampton Village Board's meeting on Friday.

    Cormac, who is 9, is a participant in Project Most, an after-school enrichment program for elementary students at the John M. Marshall and Springs Schools. He won two gold medals in the Special Olympics last year.

  • Christmas Eve
    On Wednesday, Christmas Eve services will happen at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church and St. Peter’s Catholic Church at 5 p.m., and a candlelight service at the Amagansett Presbyterian Church will begin at 7 p.m.

    A Christmas Day service will start at 9 a.m. at St. Peter’s.