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  • Walk my way, and a thousand violins begin to play, or it might be the sound of your hello, that music I hear, I get misty, the moment you’re near.

    One can almost hear the deeply romantic lyrics as the musician Pat DeRosa plays “Misty,” on a Selmer Mark VI saxophone, in his house in Montauk. Airy, breathy like the human voice, the melody of Errol Garner’s standard is awash in vibrato as it races down the wire and into a telephone receiver, to be heard several miles to the west.

  • The discovery last month of cochlodinium, or rust tide, in Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton came amid the ongoing closure of Georgica Pond to the harvesting of crabs and other marine life due to the discovery in July of another toxic algal bloom, cyanobacteria.

  • Hope and pessimism mingled in roughly equal measure at the Jewish Center of the Hamptons on Monday morning as pro-Israel panelists from the worlds of media and academia discussed the seven-week war in Gaza.
  • The financial affairs of the East Hampton Town Trustees, who own much of the common lands and waterways in town on behalf of the public, were front and center in August, as the town looks ahead to a new fiscal year in January. The East Hampton Town Board allots about half the trustees’ annual budget each year — it was $251,456 this year — while other revenue comes from fees, including those for mooring or docking in waters under their jurisdiction, and from leases of trustee land at Lazy Point in Amagansett.

  • “Christopher Walsh celebrated his eighth birthday with a party on Saturday at his Cleveland Road home.”

    It’s right there in the Sept. 13, 1973, issue of The Star, there in the Montauk notes. You can look it up.

    In truth, it was my seventh birthday, and I lived on Hudson Road, just off Cleveland. Nonetheless, I was thrilled to see my name in the newspaper. Imagine my delight, almost 40 years and a thousand or so bylines later, to see it in The Star again, this time as a reporter.

  • The East Hampton Village Zoning Board of Appeals has ruled that Howard D. Schultz, the chief executive officer of the Starbucks chain, has an accessory structure on his property that violates the village code and cannot be maintained in its present condition.
  • Brigit DiPrimo started her tenure as the new Amagansett School principal on Thursday.
  • In the heart of East Hampton Village, a plan to build a tennis court angered one neighbor and, when its proposed location was changed in response, drew an objection from another neighbor. The tennis court is to be built on the former Gardiner estate, at 127 Main Street, which is now owned by Shahab Karmely. His property and that of the first neighbor who objected, Kenneth Kuchin of 123 Main Street, are for sale.

  • Hope and fear, tolerance and suspicion, open hearts and wrenching secrets — the human experience plays out in ways both predictable and unforeseen. In tomorrow night’s screening of “The Overnighters,” the final film in the SummerDocs series presented by the Hamptons International Film Festival and Guild Hall, an epic story is told through unemployed, often desperate men, and through the words and deeds of a man who struggles mightily to help them.

  • Multiple causes and conditions are responsible for the poor health of Georgica Pond, and multiple measures must be taken to improve water quality there.

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  • Motorists and shoppers may have been confused this month by the ticket-dispensing machines at the entrance to the Reutershan and Barns Schenck parking lots in the East Hampton Village business district. On some days this month, the machines, from which motorists are to take a ticket allowing two hours' parking, were covered and out of service. On other days, they were not.

  • The Clamshell Foundation will hold its Great Bonac Chili Cook-Off on Sunday at American Legion Post 419 in Amagansett as a kickoff to its membership and fund-raising drive.

    The entry fee for individual home cooks is $25; for professionals, it is $100. The contestants will be limited to 32, and advance registration is required. Those interested can do so online at clamshellfoundation.org, under the “events” page, or by filling out a registration form at the Legion post.

  • The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will present the next installment of its Architectural Sessions program on Friday at 6 p.m. PRO BONO: Architects Who Serve Humanity will feature a discussion focusing on two architects who volunteer their time to charitable causes.

  • Cormac Orr, a third-grade student at the John M. Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton, was named this year's honorary Mayor for the Day in East Hampton Village. A ceremony at which the other mayor, Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., read a proclamation honoring Cormac was held at the East Hampton Village Board's meeting on Friday.

    Cormac, who is 9, is a participant in Project Most, an after-school enrichment program for elementary students at the John M. Marshall and Springs Schools. He won two gold medals in the Special Olympics last year.

  • Christmas Eve
    On Wednesday, Christmas Eve services will happen at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church and St. Peter’s Catholic Church at 5 p.m., and a candlelight service at the Amagansett Presbyterian Church will begin at 7 p.m.

    A Christmas Day service will start at 9 a.m. at St. Peter’s.

  • Lou Reed, the influential musician who died last year in Springs, is among the next inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The guitarist, singer, and songwriter, known for his work in the 1960s with the Velvet Underground and later as a solo artist, will be inducted in an April 18 ceremony at Public Hall in Cleveland. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame issued the announcement on Tuesday.

  • In the wake of highly publicized police killings of young African-American men, and the subsequent refusal of grand juries to indict the officers involved, a silent vigil for racial justice will happen Friday from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Bridgehampton war memorial.

  • The East Hampton Lions Club will host its fall blood drive for the Long Island Blood Bank on Monday from noon to 7 p.m. at the American Legion Post 419, at the corner of Montauk Highway and Abraham's Path. 

    The Lions Club, said Bob Schaefer, its president, has been helping with the blood drive for more than 40 years. The goal is to exceed 150 pints, each of which can help up to three people. 

  • A multi-agency drill for fire rescue and emergency medical services professionals and volunteers is scheduled for Sunday at 9 a.m. at Amagansett Farm, at 555 Montauk Highway in Amagansett. Severe weather will cancel the event.

    The drill is designed to coordinate assets in the event of a large-scale emergency and to allow local and regional agencies to work jointly on multiple scenarios. Participating emergency responders will practice the skills needed to execute rescues in difficult environments.

  • With Tuesday's voting just hours away, Representative Tim Bishop faces an uncertain future as a late Newsday/News 12/Siena College poll puts his challenger, State Senator Lee Zeldin, five points ahead at 50 percent to Mr. Bishop's 45 percent.