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  •    Last week, when I was writing about the poignant story of Yoco Unkenchie’s final journey from Shelter Island to his Montauk burying ground, and the spot between Sag Harbor and East Hampton where his funeral bier was briefly laid, I thought how sad it was that knowledge of where his body was finally placed had been long lost.

  •    The mark is gone now where they laid Yoco Unkenchie. The year was 1653, and a group of Manhansett men were carrying their dead sachem on his final trip from his Shelter Island home to Montauk, where he was to be buried.
        Yoco was the chief of Shelter Island’s native people, and it was said that upon his death they disbanded, some to live among the Montauketts, others to join the Shinnecocks.

  •    About a week ago, a small parcel, postmarked San Juan, Puerto Rico, arrived at the office. Inside, cushioned against breaking, was an old glass bottle of the sort that might have once contained a soft drink.

  • The outlook for Montauk’s threatened oceanfront improved Monday with the passage in the House of Representatives of $50.7 billion in Hurricane Sandy aid.
  •    It was family day at East Hampton Bowl, though I didn’t know it at first on Sunday as I took our 8-year-old daughter there mid-afternoon just to get out of the house.
        Evvy and I had tried and failed to go bowling a week earlier, but had arrived after what apparently was a surprisingly early closing time; maybe it was just dark inside, but the lack of vehicles in the parking lot made it seem uninviting.

  •    Cramer, they called him around the documentary film company where I worked in the early 1990s, and although I doubt Richard Ben Cramer would have remembered me from those days, the news of his death on Monday of lung cancer at only 62 was a shock and a disappointment.

  •     All will be welcomed at the next community soup dinner at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church, on Wednesday from 5 to 7 p.m. There is no cost for the meal, which is sponsored by the East Hampton Clericus, an interdenominational organization of local religious leaders, and organized by Joe Realmuto of East Hampton’s Honest Man Restaurant Group.

  •    Whether or not the East Hampton Town Board decides to ban or strictly limit duck hunting in Fort Pond, Montauk, the growing debate points to a certain reality: Things are not quite the way they used to be here.

  •    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has extended to Jan. 28 the deadline for individuals to apply for financial assistance with physical losses due to Hurricane Sandy.
        On Long Island, the extension is open to people living in Suffolk, Nassau, and Queens. It is also open to those on Staten Island, in the Bronx, and in Kings, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester Counties. Registration is online at disasterassistance. gov or by phone at 800-621-3362.

  • Three charity plunges into the chilly Atlantic Ocean are planned for New Year’s Day, about an hour apart, which means that the truly brave could triple-dip, if so moved.

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  • Here is what we know about Hurricane Arthur and the outlook for Independence Day and beyond. There is a 100-percent probability of heavy rain from an unrelated system until about sunset Friday. Hurricane Arthur is expected to pass to the east of Montauk Point, close enough that near-tropical storm-force wind gusts are expected for the region late Friday.

    Rain and a chance of lightning will end after dark Friday, but not before as much as three inches could fall. The National Weather Service has issued warnings of flooding in low-lying areas and roadways.

  • Doing a quick spreadsheet from board of elections numbers, it appears that the makeup of the East Hampton Town Trustees is largely unchanged. Two newcomers have won seats: Brian Byrnes, who previously sought a seat as trustee, and Dennis Curles.

    The top nine are the assumed winners:

     

  • An hour after the polls closed, Carissa Katz, The Star's managing editor, reported from the Dems election night HQ in Rowdy Hall that with 7 of 19 districts' numbers brought in from the polls, unofficially, Fred Overton was in the lead for town board. Following him were Kathee Burke-Gonzalez , Job Potter, and Dominick Stanzione in the race for two open seats.

  • A handful of South Fork eateries are taking part in Long Island Restaurant week, which runs through Sunday.

    In East Hampton, the 1770 House, Fresno, and the Living Room @ c/o the Maidstone are offering the $27.95, three-course price fix deal. Southampton's Nammos Estiatorio, red|bar Brasserie, and Southampton Social Club are in, as is Fresh Hamptons in Bridgehampton and Noyac's Bell & Anchor.

    Participanting restaurants offer three or more choices for each course. Reservations have been suggested.

    About 150 restaurants have signed on Islandwide.

  • East Hampton's Democratic candidates have a sizeable registration edge going into Tuesday's voting, according to numbers from the Suffolk County Board of Elections.

    According to the Suffolk County Board of Elections, of the 16,116 registered voters in the town, 6,375 were listed as Democrats, compared to 4,043 Republicans.

  • The East Hampton Environmental Coalition this week posted the results of a questionnaire sent to the five candidates for East Hampton Town Board quizzing them on environmental issues.

    Questions covered issues including the candidates' backgrounds and environmental outlooks and specifics such as flood-zone planning, dark skies rules, and dealing with climate change.

  • <p>Blonde Redhead on Saturday and Small Black on Sunday on the banks of Fort Pond.</p>
  • <p>Rock the Farm, an annual summertime benefit for the Wounded Warrior Project, has announced that the English Beat will headline its July 20 concert.</p>
  • <p>An East Hampton Town permit for Ben Watts&rsquo;s Shark Attack Sounds party, slated this year for Friday, July 5, at the Montauk Yacht Club, was approved in a split 3-to-2 vote at an East Hampton Town Board meeting last Thursday.</p>