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  •    Among the rewards of small-town newspapering are the little tidbits you learn about things that are not really news but are fascinating or amusing or heartbreaking nonetheless.
        On the serious side of the ledger, there are the ambulance calls we hear on the office emergency-frequency radio. Sometimes the call is from the home of someone we know; other times, they are strangers. On Monday, I listened with increasing anxiety as a request for transportation to the hospital for a badly dehydrated elderly woman in Springs initially went unanswered.

  •    It’s a toss-up whether the most astonishing thing about the post-Sandy gas lines here was that they happened at all or that they ended so abruptly when the state imposed odd-even rationing.
        For those who were not in the New York-New Jersey region to see it, let me describe what happened. When word spread on the Thursday after the hurricane that supplies were going to run out, a collective freak-out quickly followed. Drivers immediately converged on the gas stations to top off their tanks.

  • For those experts who have spent time studying and thinking about eastern Long Island’s resilience to storms like Hurricane Sandy, the consensus is that the time to stand and resist nature’s fury has passed.
  •     The East Hampton Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 550 and the Sag Harbor V.F.W. Post 9082 will honor veterans on Sunday — Veterans Day — with parades in each village.
        The East Hampton parade will kick off  at the Citarella market at 10 a.m. and proceed to Hook Mill for a solemn ceremony. At 11 a.m., the American Legion Post in Amagansett will perform an annual 11th Hour Ceremony to remember all who have served in the wars.

  •    For the kids, our six-day family evacuation to the grandparents’ house off Sag Harbor Road was an adventure. For me and my wife, Lisa, it was a chore. For our three dogs, it was deeply unsettling. The pig was indifferent.

  • Voting got underway early Tuesday in East Hampton Town with the disruptions from Hurricane Sandy, which shook the region a little more than a week ago, beginning to subside.
  •    A child’s bucket, full to the top, of mantis shrimp sits in the office refrigerator. I picked them up on the beach early Tuesday, just after sunrise, before the gulls could get to them.
        There was a lobster, too, that I considered taking, but it was nearly snapped in two by the waves Hurricane Sandy pushed up, and it had already begun to smell. The mantis shrimp are destined for a cooking pot, provided I can get the sand off them.

  • Suffolk Sheriff Vincent F. DeMarco was among the first Long Island officials to issue a warning that residents should begin to perpare for Hurricane Sandy's impact on the region sometime Monday. 

    The release follows:

    Suffolk County Sheriff Vincent F. DeMarco today encouraged families and individuals to prepare for a large potential storm heading toward the northeast.

  •    There is still a surfcasting rod in the back of my truck, despite a sense, widely shared, that the striped bass fall run is fizzling out.

  •     The house is quieter now that the storm windows have gone up, an annual task that I was able to complete on Sunday. Not that there are really all that many windows with removable storms to take care of. There are five full-size panels to put in and two screen-door inserts.

Blogs by this author:

  • Looking for something to do to get out of the house or pry those kids away from the electronic devices? The East Hampton Historical Society’s Marine Museum on Bluff Road will be open with free admission from Saturday through Jan. 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except on New Year’s Day.

  • Santa in Spanish
    A Spanish and English-speaking Santa will greet children and hand out gifts outside Waldbaum’s market on Park Place on Christmas Eve between 5 and 7 p.m.

    Hanukkah Opening at Vered
    "Paintings of Hope," an exhibition of work by Haim Mizrahi, an East Hampton artist, will open at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday at 6 p.m. The evening will include a candle lighting and songs with Chabad of East Hampton in celebration of the fifth night of Hanukkah.

  • Here is what we know about Hurricane Arthur and the outlook for Independence Day and beyond. There is a 100-percent probability of heavy rain from an unrelated system until about sunset Friday. Hurricane Arthur is expected to pass to the east of Montauk Point, close enough that near-tropical storm-force wind gusts are expected for the region late Friday.

    Rain and a chance of lightning will end after dark Friday, but not before as much as three inches could fall. The National Weather Service has issued warnings of flooding in low-lying areas and roadways.

  • Doing a quick spreadsheet from board of elections numbers, it appears that the makeup of the East Hampton Town Trustees is largely unchanged. Two newcomers have won seats: Brian Byrnes, who previously sought a seat as trustee, and Dennis Curles.

    The top nine are the assumed winners:

     

  • An hour after the polls closed, Carissa Katz, The Star's managing editor, reported from the Dems election night HQ in Rowdy Hall that with 7 of 19 districts' numbers brought in from the polls, unofficially, Fred Overton was in the lead for town board. Following him were Kathee Burke-Gonzalez , Job Potter, and Dominick Stanzione in the race for two open seats.