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Articles by this author:

  • Three charity plunges into the chilly Atlantic Ocean are planned for New Year’s Day, about an hour apart, which means that the truly brave could triple-dip, if so moved.
  •    A curse for someone who has to sit down in the morning and write a column is to be asked, “What are you going to write about?” It is doubly effective if the question comes right before the last one to be written in the year, when, I suppose, it is time to strike a note of some gravity or prediction or resolution.

  • Administrators and faculty in the East Hampton School District and at surrounding schools have begun reviewing existing safety measures following the shooting deaths at a school in Connecticut last week.
  •     Capt. Milton L. Miller Sr., a lifelong commercial fisherman and 12th-generation member of an East Hampton family, died on Sunday in his sleep at the Hamptons Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Southampton. He was 97.

  •    Most of our daughter Evvy’s Hanukkah presents were stolen Saturday night. The wrapped gifts had been in the back of her grandparents’ car, in a big box to be taken to New York City on Sunday for a party at an aunt and uncle’s place on Riverside Drive.

  •    Bedtime comes early this time of the year, or at least we try. I’m up an hour before the kids have to be out of bed to get a couple of ounces of coffee down before trying to cajole them into their clothes, to brush their teeth, to eat breakfast. If they make the bus, the older two are gone by 7:30. Then it’s time to stuff the youngest one into his car seat for his ride to school.

  •    Sharp criticism greeted the New York Post editors’ decision this week to put a photograph of a man about to be struck and killed by a subway train on the cover of the Tuesday edition. The image presented the Post with a dilemma its editors are likely to face a lot more than we do at The Star: when to run or not run photographs that could cross a moral or ethical line. I’m not saying the Post made the right choice, but the question is more nuanced than the critics make out.

  •    Life on the beach is a temporary proposition. This I learned from my father, who was old enough in 1938 to remember the hurricane that ripped across Long Island and became the one by which all others here are measured.

  •    Among the rewards of small-town newspapering are the little tidbits you learn about things that are not really news but are fascinating or amusing or heartbreaking nonetheless.
        On the serious side of the ledger, there are the ambulance calls we hear on the office emergency-frequency radio. Sometimes the call is from the home of someone we know; other times, they are strangers. On Monday, I listened with increasing anxiety as a request for transportation to the hospital for a badly dehydrated elderly woman in Springs initially went unanswered.

  •    It’s a toss-up whether the most astonishing thing about the post-Sandy gas lines here was that they happened at all or that they ended so abruptly when the state imposed odd-even rationing.
        For those who were not in the New York-New Jersey region to see it, let me describe what happened. When word spread on the Thursday after the hurricane that supplies were going to run out, a collective freak-out quickly followed. Drivers immediately converged on the gas stations to top off their tanks.

Blogs by this author:

  • Looking for something to do to get out of the house or pry those kids away from the electronic devices? The East Hampton Historical Society’s Marine Museum on Bluff Road will be open with free admission from Saturday through Jan. 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except on New Year’s Day.

  • Santa in Spanish
    A Spanish and English-speaking Santa will greet children and hand out gifts outside Waldbaum’s market on Park Place on Christmas Eve between 5 and 7 p.m.

    Hanukkah Opening at Vered
    "Paintings of Hope," an exhibition of work by Haim Mizrahi, an East Hampton artist, will open at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday at 6 p.m. The evening will include a candle lighting and songs with Chabad of East Hampton in celebration of the fifth night of Hanukkah.