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  •    Wednesday was Ellis’s second birthday and, like most mornings, the day started with his yelling “Da-deee” at about 5:20 as I was on my first cup of coffee. And, like most mornings, he settled back down. That was good; I had a column to write before the girls were supposed to get Ma  up for school.

  •    Saturday’s snowfall was a pleasant surprise down on Cranberry Hole Road. After an extended dig through the basement, I found suitable snowsuits for Evvy and Ellis, and we went out. My wife and elder daughter preferred to stay inside.
        The younger kids and I first took turns sledding down the minor rise that passes for a hill on our property. That broke down to a snowball fight in short order.

  •    Advocates of a free and open Internet rose up last week in protest of bills in Washington that would greatly increase the government’s ability to police what is called online piracy. Citizens called and e-mailed their representatives, and Web sites went dark for a day to make a point. The political power of the Internet made news, and the bills were sent back to committee.

  •    The East Hampton School District will soon receive a windfall from the Long Island Power Authority as a reward for the “green” aspects of its recent expansion projects. What it does with the money remains undecided, but one idea — to use it to help pay for solar or other renewable sources of energy — is a good one.

  •     Income to East Hampton Town’s community preservation fund plunged almost 22 percent in 2011.
        According to numbers in a report provided by State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. yesterday, revenue from the 2-percent tax on most real estate transactions was $13.86 million last year, compared to $17.72 million in 2010.

  •    For someone like me who has a home chicken flock, being caught at the Amagansett I.G.A. placing a dozen eggs on the checkout conveyor by a fellow poultry-keeper was highly embarrassing.
        The truth is that our hens, like many at this time of the year, take a break from producing. Egg-laying is somehow tied to the length of the day, and without artificial illumination of some sort or other, you either have to go to the store or go without for a few months.

  •    In a remarkable turn of events that could have implications on the South Fork, Williams-Sonoma may be blocked from returning to the California city that gave the cookware company its name if a new ordinance against “formula” retail stores is adopted.

  • East Hampton Village tends to get it right when it comes to aesthetics. The village once was dubbed America’s most beautiful village, and successive generations of elected officials have taken that honor to heart. In that spirit, and notwithstanding any claims to the contrary, the village board has proposed additional decorum on signs on private property — specifically those put up by real estate companies. If the law is enacted as proposed, real estate signs would be just a little larger than a page of this newspaper folded in half.

  •    According to the key contributor to East Hampton Town’s 2006 dark-skies lighting code, East Hampton Town Councilwoman Theresa Quigley is confused about a draft revision of those regulations. While stopping short of accusing her and Town Supervisor Bill Wilkinson of lying, Susan Harder says she checked with an architect who supposedly was consulted on the revisions, and he told her that as far as he knew, he had nothing to do with it.

  • The ocean shoreline in East Hampton took a heavy pounding Thursday and Friday morning as storm waves and a higher-than-usual tide cycle combined to produce considerable erosion.

Blogs by this author:

  • Santa in Spanish
    A Spanish and English-speaking Santa will greet children and hand out gifts outside Waldbaum’s market on Park Place on Christmas Eve between 5 and 7 p.m.

    Hanukkah Opening at Vered
    "Paintings of Hope," an exhibition of work by Haim Mizrahi, an East Hampton artist, will open at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday at 6 p.m. The evening will include a candle lighting and songs with Chabad of East Hampton in celebration of the fifth night of Hanukkah.

  • Here is what we know about Hurricane Arthur and the outlook for Independence Day and beyond. There is a 100-percent probability of heavy rain from an unrelated system until about sunset Friday. Hurricane Arthur is expected to pass to the east of Montauk Point, close enough that near-tropical storm-force wind gusts are expected for the region late Friday.

    Rain and a chance of lightning will end after dark Friday, but not before as much as three inches could fall. The National Weather Service has issued warnings of flooding in low-lying areas and roadways.

  • Doing a quick spreadsheet from board of elections numbers, it appears that the makeup of the East Hampton Town Trustees is largely unchanged. Two newcomers have won seats: Brian Byrnes, who previously sought a seat as trustee, and Dennis Curles.

    The top nine are the assumed winners:

     

  • An hour after the polls closed, Carissa Katz, The Star's managing editor, reported from the Dems election night HQ in Rowdy Hall that with 7 of 19 districts' numbers brought in from the polls, unofficially, Fred Overton was in the lead for town board. Following him were Kathee Burke-Gonzalez , Job Potter, and Dominick Stanzione in the race for two open seats.

  • A handful of South Fork eateries are taking part in Long Island Restaurant week, which runs through Sunday.

    In East Hampton, the 1770 House, Fresno, and the Living Room @ c/o the Maidstone are offering the $27.95, three-course price fix deal. Southampton's Nammos Estiatorio, red|bar Brasserie, and Southampton Social Club are in, as is Fresh Hamptons in Bridgehampton and Noyac's Bell & Anchor.

    Participanting restaurants offer three or more choices for each course. Reservations have been suggested.

    About 150 restaurants have signed on Islandwide.

  • East Hampton's Democratic candidates have a sizeable registration edge going into Tuesday's voting, according to numbers from the Suffolk County Board of Elections.

    According to the Suffolk County Board of Elections, of the 16,116 registered voters in the town, 6,375 were listed as Democrats, compared to 4,043 Republicans.

  • The East Hampton Environmental Coalition this week posted the results of a questionnaire sent to the five candidates for East Hampton Town Board quizzing them on environmental issues.

    Questions covered issues including the candidates' backgrounds and environmental outlooks and specifics such as flood-zone planning, dark skies rules, and dealing with climate change.

  • <p>Blonde Redhead on Saturday and Small Black on Sunday on the banks of Fort Pond.</p>