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  •    Among the rewards of small-town newspapering are the little tidbits you learn about things that are not really news but are fascinating or amusing or heartbreaking nonetheless.
        On the serious side of the ledger, there are the ambulance calls we hear on the office emergency-frequency radio. Sometimes the call is from the home of someone we know; other times, they are strangers. On Monday, I listened with increasing anxiety as a request for transportation to the hospital for a badly dehydrated elderly woman in Springs initially went unanswered.

  •    It’s a toss-up whether the most astonishing thing about the post-Sandy gas lines here was that they happened at all or that they ended so abruptly when the state imposed odd-even rationing.
        For those who were not in the New York-New Jersey region to see it, let me describe what happened. When word spread on the Thursday after the hurricane that supplies were going to run out, a collective freak-out quickly followed. Drivers immediately converged on the gas stations to top off their tanks.

  • For those experts who have spent time studying and thinking about eastern Long Island’s resilience to storms like Hurricane Sandy, the consensus is that the time to stand and resist nature’s fury has passed.
  •     The East Hampton Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 550 and the Sag Harbor V.F.W. Post 9082 will honor veterans on Sunday — Veterans Day — with parades in each village.
        The East Hampton parade will kick off  at the Citarella market at 10 a.m. and proceed to Hook Mill for a solemn ceremony. At 11 a.m., the American Legion Post in Amagansett will perform an annual 11th Hour Ceremony to remember all who have served in the wars.

  •    For the kids, our six-day family evacuation to the grandparents’ house off Sag Harbor Road was an adventure. For me and my wife, Lisa, it was a chore. For our three dogs, it was deeply unsettling. The pig was indifferent.

  • Voting got underway early Tuesday in East Hampton Town with the disruptions from Hurricane Sandy, which shook the region a little more than a week ago, beginning to subside.
  •    A child’s bucket, full to the top, of mantis shrimp sits in the office refrigerator. I picked them up on the beach early Tuesday, just after sunrise, before the gulls could get to them.
        There was a lobster, too, that I considered taking, but it was nearly snapped in two by the waves Hurricane Sandy pushed up, and it had already begun to smell. The mantis shrimp are destined for a cooking pot, provided I can get the sand off them.

  • Suffolk Sheriff Vincent F. DeMarco was among the first Long Island officials to issue a warning that residents should begin to perpare for Hurricane Sandy's impact on the region sometime Monday. 

    The release follows:

    Suffolk County Sheriff Vincent F. DeMarco today encouraged families and individuals to prepare for a large potential storm heading toward the northeast.

  •    There is still a surfcasting rod in the back of my truck, despite a sense, widely shared, that the striped bass fall run is fizzling out.

  •     The house is quieter now that the storm windows have gone up, an annual task that I was able to complete on Sunday. Not that there are really all that many windows with removable storms to take care of. There are five full-size panels to put in and two screen-door inserts.

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