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  •     In recent East Hampton Town Justice Court adjudications, a number of driving-while-intoxicated cases and related offenses were disposed of.
        On May 3, Justice Lisa R. Rana accepted a guilty plea from James Selberg-Strauss, 20, of Sag Harbor, who had been arrested by East Hampton Town police in September and charged with operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs and unlicensed driving, as well as several traffic infractions. Justice Rana sentenced him to a one-year license suspension and $995 in fines and court fees.

  •    Nights for parents of young and getting-to-be-not-so-young children can be complicated, and by the standards of those without progeny at home, the things we celebrate must seem a little weird. Take, for example, the case of one editorial staff member here who was positively giddy on Tuesday morning because both her toddlers slept all the way through to 6:30 a.m.

  •     A Suffolk Criminal Court judge sentenced Paul S. Apostolides, an Islip resident who is an owner of Paulie’s Tackle Shop in Montauk, on Friday to six months in jail on child pornography charges.
        Mr. Apostolides had pleaded guilty on April 12 to six counts in all — promoting a sexual performance by a child under 17 and possession of child pornography — in a case in which police provided few details.

  •    East Hampton Main Street will be strangely silent Monday morning. For a brief hour the hissing rumble of a three-day weekend’s traffic will cease as a modest line of veterans assemble to parade north toward Hook Mill and the war memorial.

  •    The new home of the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill will open its doors for the first time on Saturday, Nov. 10, the museum announced this week.

  •    This is the season in which the parents of grade-school children put entirely too many miles on their vehicles. There are year-end dance recitals, music and theater performances, sports league playoffs, and the like to ferry the younger set to and from. Lisa and I have been spending what seems like hours every afternoon tooling between Amagansett and points west with one or more children in the back seat.

  •    Readers of this column may remember that a few weeks back I wrote about our family’s ongoing scuffle over whether or not to buy an expensive pet pig. The battle lines had this columnist on the “no” side, Mom and one daughter on the “yes” side, our 7-year-old daughter on the “sounds okay to me” side, and the 2-year-old oblivious and looking for his finger paints.

  •    I had meant to close off the kitchen exhaust vent so the wrens could not get inside.
        About a month ago, while sitting in the living room at home, I was startled by a metallic thumping from somewhere within the walls. The racket, it turned out, came from a pair of what I think are Carolina wrens. They had begun stacking sticks inside an open vent louver on the exterior of the kitchen.

  •     One of the benefits of the very, very mild winter just past is that outdoor chores that would be still hanging over my head are more or less done.
        A couple of weekends ago, in fact, I pruned the grapes and brambles around the edge of the property and cut back branches along the driveway. This was well before the ticks were again afoot and the poison ivy had begun to grow.

  •    Out of the blue, our older daughter announced last week that she wanted a pig — sorely. This was not an ordinary pig, mind you, but some sort of supposed mini-breed she learned about on the Internet, which could be hers for $850, shipping from Indiana, or wherever, extra. I said no, of course, which set off a fit of wailing unprecedented for its length, if not for volume.

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