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  • A truism about cooking is that if you lay a breaded coating onto just about anything and fry it up in a bit of oil, kids will eat it without objection. Still, it was with no minor degree of amazement that I was able to get a mess of fritters made from a notably pungent shellfish down our brood’s craws the other night.

  • Last week, I wrote about a newfound interest in sea gulls, birds that I had, like many others here, tended to overlook. It was perhaps by some Murphy’s Law that one of my brothers-in-law and I ended up rescuing one on the Fourth of July.

  • It was late in the day, after a child’s birthday party had moved from the beach up to the house, that something I had never noticed before drew my attenton to a raft of black-backed gulls that had gathered near the shore for an evening hunt for crabs.

  • Memo to South Fork businesses that raise prices before the arrival the summer hordes: We live here, too.

  • Two things have greatly improved the way we eat at the Rattray house this spring. First, warmer weather brought the garden to life and helped encourage me to get out on the water to fish and clam. The other is that after talking for years about signing up for weekly produce with one of the community-supported agriculture ventures that have popped up here, we joined Amber Waves.

  • The annual onslaught of ticks is in full swing around here now, which has prompted talk of drastic measures. Each of the members of our human family on Cranberry Hole Road in Amagansett has pulled at least one of the horrifying little pests from his or her person recently, and our animals have been playing unwitting hosts as well.

  • Things could be worse, much worse — and they were on the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coast in the millennia before records about hurricanes were kept.
  • Spring agrees with Leo the pig. Regular readers of this column may recall that about two years ago, over my desperate protests, two of the women of our household insisted that we get a pet of the cloven-hoof variety.

  • One of the small pleasures at the office occurs when the latest copy of The Vineyard Gazette arrives. We have had a subscription to this lovely, old-fashioned broadsheet for a long time now, and it is always interesting to see how that island, not all that dissimilar from the East End of Long Island, copes with some of the same pressures.

  •     Thanks to a spring that has seemed somewhat cooler than usual, the grass, weeds, and fallen twigs that are our lawn have been slow to get going. This meant that I was able to put off taking the rusty old lawn mower out of storage until Sunday.

Blogs by this author:

  • Looking for something to do to get out of the house or pry those kids away from the electronic devices? The East Hampton Historical Society’s Marine Museum on Bluff Road will be open with free admission from Saturday through Jan. 4, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., except on New Year’s Day.

  • Santa in Spanish
    A Spanish and English-speaking Santa will greet children and hand out gifts outside Waldbaum’s market on Park Place on Christmas Eve between 5 and 7 p.m.

    Hanukkah Opening at Vered
    "Paintings of Hope," an exhibition of work by Haim Mizrahi, an East Hampton artist, will open at Vered Gallery in East Hampton on Saturday at 6 p.m. The evening will include a candle lighting and songs with Chabad of East Hampton in celebration of the fifth night of Hanukkah.

  • Here is what we know about Hurricane Arthur and the outlook for Independence Day and beyond. There is a 100-percent probability of heavy rain from an unrelated system until about sunset Friday. Hurricane Arthur is expected to pass to the east of Montauk Point, close enough that near-tropical storm-force wind gusts are expected for the region late Friday.

    Rain and a chance of lightning will end after dark Friday, but not before as much as three inches could fall. The National Weather Service has issued warnings of flooding in low-lying areas and roadways.

  • Doing a quick spreadsheet from board of elections numbers, it appears that the makeup of the East Hampton Town Trustees is largely unchanged. Two newcomers have won seats: Brian Byrnes, who previously sought a seat as trustee, and Dennis Curles.

    The top nine are the assumed winners:

     

  • An hour after the polls closed, Carissa Katz, The Star's managing editor, reported from the Dems election night HQ in Rowdy Hall that with 7 of 19 districts' numbers brought in from the polls, unofficially, Fred Overton was in the lead for town board. Following him were Kathee Burke-Gonzalez , Job Potter, and Dominick Stanzione in the race for two open seats.

  • A handful of South Fork eateries are taking part in Long Island Restaurant week, which runs through Sunday.

    In East Hampton, the 1770 House, Fresno, and the Living Room @ c/o the Maidstone are offering the $27.95, three-course price fix deal. Southampton's Nammos Estiatorio, red|bar Brasserie, and Southampton Social Club are in, as is Fresh Hamptons in Bridgehampton and Noyac's Bell & Anchor.

    Participanting restaurants offer three or more choices for each course. Reservations have been suggested.

    About 150 restaurants have signed on Islandwide.

  • East Hampton's Democratic candidates have a sizeable registration edge going into Tuesday's voting, according to numbers from the Suffolk County Board of Elections.

    According to the Suffolk County Board of Elections, of the 16,116 registered voters in the town, 6,375 were listed as Democrats, compared to 4,043 Republicans.

  • The East Hampton Environmental Coalition this week posted the results of a questionnaire sent to the five candidates for East Hampton Town Board quizzing them on environmental issues.

    Questions covered issues including the candidates' backgrounds and environmental outlooks and specifics such as flood-zone planning, dark skies rules, and dealing with climate change.

  • <p>Blonde Redhead on Saturday and Small Black on Sunday on the banks of Fort Pond.</p>
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