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Articles by this author:

  • So, the house you bought way back when is now worth a pile of cash. Trouble is, you are struggling to keep up the monthly mortgage payments. Or, you own the house free and clear, but your income isn’t adequate to keep you in the style in which you feel you deserve.
  • A service that looks out for the interests of absentee owners, especially those renovating or building a house.
  • It’s bordering on cliché to say that the real estate market is very strong right now. If a property is priced right, it will sell, or so goes the common wisdom. But how many houses are priced right? Put another way, how many are overpriced? A lot, it turns out.
  • According to agents, the current must-have for many Hamptons real estate customers is a new house.
  • What is happening here is part of a larger national trend of marketing residential properties as investments.
  •      There are Hamptoners who only use their houses here one week a year. I know this because two years ago I worked as a sous chef for such a family. Headed by one of the biggest Wall Street whales, they only inhabit their Water Mill House during Thanksgiving week, the rest of the year being spent in the city, Florida, England, France, and probably more places to which I’m not privy.

  •     A modest bungalow dating from 1911 on Cooper Lane in East Hampton is populated by pictures and objects that have been found at galleries, yard sales, and thrift shops. Before the owner, an architect and interior designer, takes anything home, he asks, “Does it speak to me? Is there a quality that’s interesting or amusing or wonderful? Or is it unbelievably awful?” He collects for each of those reasons.

  • At a “demolition sale” Saturday at a property on Meadowlark Lane, off Ocean Road in Bridgehampton, an army of bargain hunters descended upon a house fronting Sagg Pond and carted off assorted treasures from a washing machine to the blue stone walkway surrounding the pool.
  • These days Flanders is attracting first-time homebuyers and others from more expensive areas farther east
  • Last week Save Sag Harbor, a not-for-profit group of volunteers, was able to persuade the developers of the Bulova watchcase factory to stop cladding the exterior of the project’s town houses with synthetic materials

Blogs by this author:

  • We've heard that sauvignon blanc pairs well with fish, but how about chardonnay mixed with prehistoric shark tooth jewelry?

    Lieb Cellars East Hampton, the wine tasting room on Park Place in the Reutershan parking lot, is featuring different local vendors on July weekends. The pop-up for July 4th weekend was Fin Jewelry, fine jewelry made of shark teeth and gold by Bella Ornaf, a Montauk shark wrangler, and Whalebone Creative, purveyors of handmade goods inspired by the original Montauk culture.

  • It made sense when Vineyard Vines, a shop known for preppy apparel, opened in Southampton, land of the Bathing Corp., Meadow Club, and assorted world class golf courses.  Having just opened a pop-up store on Main Street in East Hampton Village, the jury is still out on how well it will do in the burgh that is home more to Hollywood types and artists than socialites.

  • For visitors without cars, residents who want to help alleviate traffic, or those who want an affordable solution to drinking and getting around, the Hamptons Hopper has hit the road.

    Last week marked the maiden journey of the "retro chic" shuttle bus that bills itself as a mode of both “transportation and socialization.” The service, with a fleet of sea-green converted school buses, utilizes a mobile app for iPhone (and soon Android) to let riders see where the stops are and when to expect its arrival.

  • Another installment in our sampling of East Hampton shop prices this summer. Prices speak for themselves.

  • First West Elm, an edgy furnishings chain, opened this spring in Water Mill. Then ground was broken on land in Wainscott for a Home Goods branch, the discount home décor adjunct of T.J. Maxx.

  • Regina Kravitz, a veteran fashion designer, has partnered with Stitch, a Southampton boutique and tailor shop where her contemporary Hamptons line called ReginaKravitz for Stitch will be available.

  • We may pretend we don’t care, but, c’mon, don’t you want to know which Southampton house the Kardashian sisters rented this summer?

    Khloe, Kourtney, and presumably Kim, fresh from her betrothal to Kanye West, rented a storefront off Job’s Lane in Southampton and will be filming their reality TV series “Kourtney and Khloe Take the Hamptons,” this summer, based on their adventures. Now, since they will need somewhere to sleep after all their cavorting around town, they have leased digs in North Sea.

  • Each summer dozens of fitness studios come . . . and go at season’s end. That’s one reason to take notice of Elements Fitness Studio. Opened in July by Andrea Fornarola Hunsberger, a dancer, the bright space on East Hampton’s Newtown Lane with mirrored walls and ballet barres is here to stay year round. The other reason is its focused selection of challenging workouts.

  • Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, an East Hampton emporium dedicated to selling both rare publications and art, has partnered this summer with Grey Area, an art and design consultancy. With Kyle DeWoody at the helm, Grey Area defines its mission thus: "With art as a starting point, Grey Area seeks to push the limits of creative engagement and expression through collaboration, installation, and programming."

  • The crew at East Hampton Gourmet Food, an 18-year-old wholesale-retail catering company and bakery off Newtown Lane, are working day and night to prepare enough gluten-free crisp bread to wow some 300 judges. Their lentil-rice crisp bread with sesame pink salt has been nominated for the food industry’s prestigious SOFI Award, an acronym that stands for specialty outstanding food innovation. The awards honor members of the Specialty Food Association who “represent culinary innovation across America and around the globe,” according to its website.