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  •    Barbara Feldman, an East Hampton interior designer, has found her calling, and it turns out to be a composite of her previous careers. A former designer of commercial and medical interiors, a real estate agent, and a house stager, she reinvented herself not long ago after analyzing the demographics of the South Fork and realizing that a plethora of young families live here. “They need a different kind of design,” she said.

  •     East Hamptoners like to regale outsiders with how the village was once voted the most beautiful in the country, the consequence of its perfect storm of historic edifices, picturesque pond, and canopy of stately trees — most notably American elms.

  •     Ted Delano, who calls himself a “digital cartographer,” has founded an online guide to the Hamptons — both as a Web site and an app — that he claims, surprisingly, has not been done anywhere else. According to his research, no one has yet created a “magazine quality” visual forum in cyberspace to showcase local businesses that “maps an entire community and is hand-curated.”

  • On Friday a horde of bargain hunters descended upon an 11,000-square-foot mansion on Hedges Lane in Sagaponack. This wasn’t your average estate sale, but rather a “demolition sale,” an upscale free-for-all in which pretty much everything that wasn’t nailed down had to go.
  •    With the exception of Swedish meatballs and gravadlax, most Americans, no matter how culinarily sophisticated, have a limited knowledge of Swedish food.

       A lot of our ignorance is due to a concept of humility that informs the Swedish temperament called janteelagen, according to Andrew Reice, an American who lives in Sweden and mounted Swedish Culininary Summer, a marketing campaign to introduce South Forkers to both Swedish cuisine and culture this summer. “It’s hard to promote yourself when you’re not supposed to brag,” he said.

  • In a land known for over-the-top baronial manses and quaint Shingle Style cottages, there have been few, dare we utter the word, condominiums, east of the Shinnecock Canal, that is, or west of Montauk, where a preponderance of motels can relatively easily be converted into condos, and even more easily into co-ops.
  •     Virginia and Tom Hessler of McGuirk Street in East Hampton were alarmed when they saw a Long Island Power Authority stake on their front lawn. Rumor had it, so said their neighbors, that a pole was to be installed there.

  • Though slow to catch on, many agents now recommend that sellers stage their properties — both indoors and out. “Stagers are worth their weight in gold,” said Judi Desiderio, founder of Town and Country Real Estate.
  • When Jeffrey Collé was a kid, he worked as an apprentice carpenter with his grandfather, a Belgian immigrant, and father maintaining Gold Coast estates.
  •    Earlier this summer I was sitting with a couple of friends at the bar at the Topping Rose House and began to talk to the woman next to me. Why else go to a bar except to meet people you otherwise wouldn’t? In this case, both she and the conversation turned out to be well worth the next day’s hangover.

Blogs by this author:

  • We've heard that sauvignon blanc pairs well with fish, but how about chardonnay mixed with prehistoric shark tooth jewelry?

    Lieb Cellars East Hampton, the wine tasting room on Park Place in the Reutershan parking lot, is featuring different local vendors on July weekends. The pop-up for July 4th weekend was Fin Jewelry, fine jewelry made of shark teeth and gold by Bella Ornaf, a Montauk shark wrangler, and Whalebone Creative, purveyors of handmade goods inspired by the original Montauk culture.

  • It made sense when Vineyard Vines, a shop known for preppy apparel, opened in Southampton, land of the Bathing Corp., Meadow Club, and assorted world class golf courses.  Having just opened a pop-up store on Main Street in East Hampton Village, the jury is still out on how well it will do in the burgh that is home more to Hollywood types and artists than socialites.

  • For visitors without cars, residents who want to help alleviate traffic, or those who want an affordable solution to drinking and getting around, the Hamptons Hopper has hit the road.

    Last week marked the maiden journey of the "retro chic" shuttle bus that bills itself as a mode of both “transportation and socialization.” The service, with a fleet of sea-green converted school buses, utilizes a mobile app for iPhone (and soon Android) to let riders see where the stops are and when to expect its arrival.

  • Another installment in our sampling of East Hampton shop prices this summer. Prices speak for themselves.

  • First West Elm, an edgy furnishings chain, opened this spring in Water Mill. Then ground was broken on land in Wainscott for a Home Goods branch, the discount home décor adjunct of T.J. Maxx.

  • Regina Kravitz, a veteran fashion designer, has partnered with Stitch, a Southampton boutique and tailor shop where her contemporary Hamptons line called ReginaKravitz for Stitch will be available.

  • We may pretend we don’t care, but, c’mon, don’t you want to know which Southampton house the Kardashian sisters rented this summer?

    Khloe, Kourtney, and presumably Kim, fresh from her betrothal to Kanye West, rented a storefront off Job’s Lane in Southampton and will be filming their reality TV series “Kourtney and Khloe Take the Hamptons,” this summer, based on their adventures. Now, since they will need somewhere to sleep after all their cavorting around town, they have leased digs in North Sea.

  • Each summer dozens of fitness studios come . . . and go at season’s end. That’s one reason to take notice of Elements Fitness Studio. Opened in July by Andrea Fornarola Hunsberger, a dancer, the bright space on East Hampton’s Newtown Lane with mirrored walls and ballet barres is here to stay year round. The other reason is its focused selection of challenging workouts.

  • Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, an East Hampton emporium dedicated to selling both rare publications and art, has partnered this summer with Grey Area, an art and design consultancy. With Kyle DeWoody at the helm, Grey Area defines its mission thus: "With art as a starting point, Grey Area seeks to push the limits of creative engagement and expression through collaboration, installation, and programming."

  • The crew at East Hampton Gourmet Food, an 18-year-old wholesale-retail catering company and bakery off Newtown Lane, are working day and night to prepare enough gluten-free crisp bread to wow some 300 judges. Their lentil-rice crisp bread with sesame pink salt has been nominated for the food industry’s prestigious SOFI Award, an acronym that stands for specialty outstanding food innovation. The awards honor members of the Specialty Food Association who “represent culinary innovation across America and around the globe,” according to its website.